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Mason City Globe Gazette: Monday, July 31, 1950 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - July 31, 1950, Mason City, Iowa                                NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME MASON CITY GLOBEGAZETTE THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS VOL LVI Associated Press and United Press Full Lease Wires Five Cents a Copy One Mans Opinion A Commentary By W EARL HALL Managing Editor The Air Arm in National Defense TT may sound strange but its a A fact none the less that although I am a native midwesterner the coldest weather Ive ever ex perienced all Florida Moreover I met up with subzero temperature right in the very height of Floridas sum mer By this time of course youre that theres some catch in my your suspicions are wellfounded Im resorting to a little trick to bribe you into hearing out my story about one of the most interesting and important military installations in the world The 40degreesbelowzero tem perature to which I was briefly exposed had nothing whatever to do with Floridas climate summer or winter It was indoors not out doors and if I had waited until the next day the mercury would have been 25 degrees instead of 40 below In fact two of my one from Oklahoma the other from Washington D visit the place again One came out with a frostbitten nose the other with a nipped ear In a Climatic Hangar Its time to tell you that this polar setting which can be made even more impressive by the addi tion of wind and snow was the worldfamous climatic hangar at Eglin air force proving ground Florida This giant building covering nearly a square block of ground and almost as tall as a 6 story building is the most spectacular element of the Eglin operation and I suspect as important as any other The air force wants to know how men and machines will be have under any and all climatic conditions Under this one spa cious roof in a building erected at a cost of some million it is finding the answers to this ques tion Temperature extremes are from the 65 below zero Ive men tioned to 165 degrees above zero With the 60 other members of 4r the party inspecting our national defenses I donned a parka and strolled across the insulated hangar containing a wide variety of planes and other equipment that be needed in the event of war in an Arctic clime 5 Minutes Long Enough The change from 90 degrees outside to 40 degrees below inside was not too pleasant 1 was there something less than 5 minutes That was enough Workers accus tomed to it are able to remain in the spacious refrigerator for more than an hour But that wasnt for me the same are various other test test room hot test room desert test room jungle test room and tropicmarine test room each 13 feet square In the jungle room through a window I saw the much despised jungle fungus growth on various items of military equip ment It seems to thrive best on leather I could confine this visit with you to this amazing structure and its contents But that wouldnt be putting it in its proper perspective with respect to the entire Eglin operation So lets leave the cli matic hangar and take a quick look at the larger picture Not for Pilot Training Its important first to under itand that Eglins function is not to train pilots Anything along this line is purely incidental to the primary aim of testing equipment from lowly socks to mighty B36 air planes If a new airplane is designed for the air force it must run the rigorous tests provided at Eglin before being brought into large scale production If a new flying technique is proposed it must be given a searching trial at Eglin II was here that Jimmy Doolittle and his men trained for their historic mission over Tokyo Theres no shortage of space for whatever test that might be de sired About 800 square mile somewhat more than the average Illinois or Wisconsin county been incorporated into the proving ground Its in the ex treme western end of the Florida neck on the gulf near Pensacola As in the case of Fort Benning about which Ive already visited with you the land thus taken over by the government wasnt produc ing very much when privately owned The 7000 persons officers and men presently stationed a Eglin base constitute a very much more valuable crop for the state of Florida Wide Variety of Planes Certainly not in America anc probably not in the entire work would one find as many differen kinds and sizes of aircraft as on that giant air field which sur rounds the climatic hangar In cidentally there are either 9 or 10 other lessejr landing fields within the boundaries of Eglin air base These aircraft range in size from the tiny American made replica o the German robot planes known then as the Vl to the gargantuan Continued on Pare 2 Reveal More ArWeapons MASON CITY IOWA MONDAY JULY 31 1950 HOME EDITION liliilf This Paper Consists of Two One No Fresh US Troops Land With Tanks reduction of Explosive New Record By FRANK E CAREY Associated Press Science Reporter Washington I The atomic mergy commission said Monday hat since January it has produced record amount of the explosive vhich goes into Abombs It also disclosed that it is study ng the possibility of making an itomic poison weapon In a semiannual report to con fess the atomic agency told of a teppedtip program during the 1st i months of this year involving all forms of atomic weapons in luding the hydrogen bomb More Bombs Seen And it hinted that this may have esulted in greater production of itomic bombs by saying that dur ng the 6 month period the rate of current operations on the en ire atomic project had acceler ited samfe period the commis ion said production of uranium 35 and explosive ngredients used in making atomic the highest rate in he history of the project The ame materials also are used in experimenting with atomic power or industrial plants and ships The commission carefully re rained from saying outright what ts rate of Abomb production was during the 6 months At Authorized Rate Atomic weapons and fission able materials it said were pro duced at the rate authorized by he president for the calendar year 1950 It didnt give the rate Mr Tru man had authorized The agenpy reported a possibil ty of increasing its supplies of precious uranium ores from both oreign and domestic sources It made no statement as to progress on the hydrogen bomb But it said the atomic program in general had been recast to imple ment the presidents directive of ast January ordering work con inued on all forms of weapons including the Hbomb Decisions were made and plans ormed for constructing the new acilities necessary to implement that directive fully the report stated adding that these facilities would be substantial As to the 3rd possible atomic report said only that studies on the feasibility of radiological sub stances as a method of warfare were continued Brannon Plan Dead Say Senators Advocates Not Comforted by Defeat of Sen Elmer Thomas Washington Brannan farm plan appeared to be fading put Monday as a major political issue a casualty of the Korean war Senator Hickenlooper R a critic of the proposal told a reporter he thinks the Brannan plan died in the demo cratic primary in Iowa when Al bert J Loveland former under secretary of agriculture and a supporter of the proposal got less than a majority of the votes in winning the democratic senatorial nomination Continues Attack As Lovelands November oppo nent Hickenlooper said he in tends to continue his attacks on the proposal of Secretary of Agri culture Brannan to pay produc tion subsidies to farmers who market their perishable crops for what they can get out of them Senator Humphrey said he thinks that if farm price rise some other features of the Brannan plan wont draw much interest But he expressed the view that the war is likely to bring an even greater emphasis than before on the disposal of perishables Certainly in a war we cant afford to pile up perishable com modities and let them spoil while prices are skysrocketing he said Many lawmakers believe that rising prices will wash out the twoparty argument over the farm problem in the November congressional elections Some democrats as well as most of the republicans oppose the Brannan plan although President Truman has gone down the line for it Promises Hearing Brannan plan advocates got no comfort in the defeat of Senator Elmer Thomas in his bid for renomination in the July 25 Oklahoma primary While Thomas wasnt listed as an out and out supporter he had prom ised hearings on the secretarys proposal Senator Ellender who will succeed Thomas as chairman of the senate agriculture commit tee if the democrats retain con trol of the senate is flatly op posed to the plan Senate Group Turns Down Judge Switzer Washington senate judiciary committee rejected Monday the nomination of Car roll O Switzer to be federal dis trict judge for southern Iowa The vote was unanimous against confirmation It now will be up to the senate itself to decide whether President Trumans nomination of Switzer will be confirmed or rejected The appointment has been op posed by both Iowa senators Gil lette democrat and Hickenlooper republican The senate usually refuses to confirm nominees whose appoint ment is opposed by senators from the state involved especially when the senators are members of the same political party as the pres ident Switzer has held the federal judgeship since last October under a temporary recess ap pointment He first was nominated in May 1949The senate took no action last year His temporary appoint ment was made by Mr Truman after congress adjourned Another regular nomination went to the senate at the start of the new session of congress last January Gillette had suggested that Mr Truman appoint either William F Riley of Des Moines or Ed Hal bach of Clinton Senate Votes Increase of Marshall Aid Washington fP The senate voted Monday to increase this years Marshall plan funds by raising the amount for western Europe to Senator Hayden DAriz pro posed the increase which was ap proved 42 to 29 A vote on the en tire bill was still ahead Before taking up Haydens amendment the senate slapped down 59 to 12 an attemptby Senator Kent RMo to make a cut of Dips Cash In Portsmouth N H than souls were lifted when evan gelist Billy Graham held his re vival meetings here Police re ported that pickpockets netted nearly LUNCH TIME FOR GUARD was lunch time when the natlonafguard truck convoy that left Mason City early Saturday morning for Fort Leonard Wood Mo reached a country school yard 5 miles south of Montezuma in Poweshiek county This group found a grassy and shady spot under some big trees in the yard to eat the box lunch VONGOOK NORTH SOUTH REDS CAPTURE SOUTHERN ANCHOR OF U S LINE Communist colurmfsTam mered relentlessly at American and South Korean defenses open arrows and Chinju southern anchor of the U S defense line fell to the red force driving east ward from the southwest corner of the peninsula North of Chinju two red columns B pushed through Kochang and approached Chirye in a thrust toward Kumchon Far ther north the reds C have been held in check Fresh troops direct from the United States landed in South Korea Broken line is approximate front To Accept Leopold Offer to Abdicate Brussels major parties in Belgium agreed Monday night to accept King Leopolds offer to step aside in favor Prince Baudouin of his son The agreement was revealed by Liberal Representative Rene Le fevre after hours of consultations by delegations from the antiLeo pold socialists the liberals and the proking Christian socialists President To Ask Billion Added Aid to AntiReds Washington Tru man told congressional leaders Monday he is sending up a mes sage asking addi tional for military aid to anti communist nations Chairman Cannon DMo of the house appropriations commit tee said there unanimous agreement among democratic and republican leaders to expedite ac tion on the request Cannon said the estimates for the additional will be submitted through a letter to Speaker Rayburn and referred di rectly to the house appropriations committee which will take it up immediately OUT FOR A along the line just south Ottumwa members of the national guard convoy got an opportunity to stretch their legs while a change of drivers was being made t i Allies Still Outnumbered 2 to 1 as New Troops Land By ELTON C FAY Associated Press Military Reporter Washington with the reinforcements now ashore or on the way the United StatesSouth Korean force still will number only about half that of the enemys savage horde of fighters This is counting everything the United States has in Ko rea or has announced as ear marked for the fighting And it is based also on the estimate of one of Gen MacArthurs intelli gence officers that the North Ko rean invader by frantic mobil ization has brought his strength up to an army of 200000 men The numerical disadvantage must be overcome by firepower air power and sea power 40000 Originally The 3 United States army divi sions which with the South Ko rean army were carrying on the battle as reinforcements from the United States neared the war zone probably numbered no more than 40000 men Last week some of the help started arriving a unit of undisclosed size rushed up from occupation forces in Oki nawa as the crisis mounted The South Korean army when the communists struck on June 25 were reported to have an army of about 96000 out of which 8 divi sions of about 10000man size were formed There are reasons to believe that heavy casualties have cut this original force to about half Heavy South Korean Losses Much of the loss occurred in the 1st phase of the fighting The South Koreans were armed only with defensive tanks some antitank artillery of too small caliber some old model ba zookas that were ineffective against enemy armor So their losses were high as tankled red ground forces chewed up their di visions and rolled southward To back up the U S 25th 24th and 1st cavalry infantry divi sions the United States so far has tapped only two major elements A fortnight ago the 1st marine division pushed off from the American west coast Sailing shortly thereafter were the initial elements of the 2nd infantry divi sion Some unidentified units from other army divisions in the United States also were readied for de parture It is doubtful if the 2nd army and 1st marine division between them contain much 20000 or 23000 men more than Weather Report FORECAST Mason City Partly cloudy and cooler Monday night Low Mon day night 60 Tuesday partly cloudy and cooler with high 78 Iowa Fair west gradually clear ing east portion Monday night Cooler Tuesday generally fair and less humid Low Monday night 55to 60 west 60 to 65 east High Tuesday 74 to 80 Further outlook Fair and pleas ant Wednesday Low Tuesday night 54 to 58 High Wednes day 77 to 82 Thursday partly cloudy and somewhat warmer with scattered showers likely west portion Thursday night Minnesota Partly cloudy with oc casional light rain or drizzle ex treme north Monday night and ip extreme northeast Tuesday Cooler west and extreme south Monday night Low Monday night 5056 north 5458 south High Tuesday 6875 north 7377 south IN MASON CITY Globe Gazette weather statis tics for the 24 hours ending at 8 a m July 31 Maximum 88 Minimum 65 At 8 a m 75 Precipitation 2 Years ago Maximum 75 Minimum 50 Globe Gazette weather statis tics for the 24 hours ending at 8 a m July 30 Maximum 87 Minimum 65 At 8 a m 73 Year ago Maximum Minimum 51 WANT BRIDGES JAILED San Francisco govern ment attorney said the government wil ask revocation Monday of the bail upon which Harry Bridges is at liberty Chinju Near Pusan Falls to Red Army U S Says Kumchon Will Be Defended at All Costs Washington air force ordered additional medium bomber units to the far east Monday A spokesman said the order involves B29s aud B50s He did not disclose the number of units or the number of bomb ers involved Tokyo AP Troops of the U S 2nd infantry divi sion under Maj Gen Laurence B Reiser landed with tanks in Korea Monday and sped forward to help brace shrink ing allied lines General MacArthurs head quarters said the North Ko rean reds in force were shift ing their pressure from the central sector to the west and southwest Americans Withdraw The communists captured Chinju 55 miles west of Pu san vital U S base Asso ciated Press Correspondent Hal Boyle reported from out side Chinju that the Ameri cans withdrew from the coast al anchor to new positions less than 50 miles from Pusan Arriving direct from the United States many of the new troops headed out in trucks to plug holes punched by North Korean reds along a rectangular front before Pusan on the southeast coast Up to 200000 men were reported in the big red surge against the shrinking defense area New Pressure In the central front new pres sure was put on Kumchon But a U S 1st cavalry spokesman there said the city will be held at all costs He said the troops had been forced back slightly to the east however Kumchon is 32 miles northwest of Taegu rail city northwest of Pusan As the decisive battle raged Gen Douglas MacArthur and his top advisers flew to Formosa to talk with Generalissimo Chiang Kaishek nationalist Chinese lead er Chiang has offered 33000 foot soldiers and some air force units to MacArthur United Nations com mander His visit followed a Chinese na tionalist air raid on 500 red China junks assembling for a possible blow at Quemoy nationalist island near Amoy Possibly Not Sanctioned There was no indication this raid had American sanction Pres ident Truman had asked Chiang 5 weeks ago to hold his island forces off from attacks on Chinese reds unless the nationalists themselves were attacked MacArthur met a cordial recep tion in Formosa The Korean fighting now ii spread over a rough rectangle It extends 80 miles up the east coast from Pusan to Yongdqk thence west 70 miles to Hamchang 100 miles due south from Hamchang to the vicinity of Chinju Spread thinly through the moun tains and valleys are 3 U S divi 1st cavalry and the 24th and 25th infantry divisions the U S 5th air force and fighting South Koreans Dispatches from the front said many communist dead were strewn on the battlefield Their own trucks raced over the bodies trying to reach new positions against the Americans Two Divisions Lead At least two red divisions led the powerful flanking movement around Chinju Lt Gen Walton H Walker commander of the U S Eighth army in Korea ordered his men two days ago to fight or die in their present positions Gen MacArthurs headquarters in its early Tuesday release said the heavy pressure from the reds had shifted to the west and south west WOUNDED IN ACTION Washington The defense department has reported Pfc Wil liam H Fisher son of Floyd J Fisher Fort Dodge has been wounded in action in Korea SAME BUck flac IB 2t   

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