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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: January 9, 1950 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - January 9, 1950, Mason City, Iowa                                I NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITBD FOR HOME I MASON CITY GLOBEGAZETT THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS VOL Associated Press and United Press Full Lease Wires Five Cents a Copy MASON CITi IOWA MONDAY JANUARY 9 1950 HOME EDITION mmr One Mans Opinion A Radio Commentary By W EARL HALL Managing Editor Lets Look at the Brannan Plan SOME of the people who have doubts about Santa Claus and perpetual motion are looking askance these days at the admin istrations farm relief program known as the Brannan plan They seem to think the day of miracles is over and they even take a dim view of magic Under the Brannan plans pros pectus the farming industry would be assured of an income equal to that of the average dur ing the 10 year period between 1939 and 1949 Those were the lushest years in farmings history At the same time products of the farm would be permitted to seek their own level in the open market with the government picking up the check to paythe farmer if the price was below the Brannan conception of parity A 2Pronged Bait For vote catching purposes theres a double lure here On the one hand the farmer is promised a continuation of the highest in come he has ever known on the ether the consumer is promised cheap food What more could be fairer as a sports writer friend of mine over in Wisconsin is wont to observe The part softpedaled in the whole matter is that the cost of the plan will fall on the taxpayer What he would save in possible lower food costs would be paid out and several times over in millions of cases in the form of increased federal taxes What the plan would cost isnt even estimated by its sponsor ex cept in the most general terms wouldnt be any more than the present farm program is costing us he once stated Thats about as definite as he has ever been on the subject From to Billion But it is this aspect of the mat ter which frightened the last con gress Even some of the most loyal supporters of the administration shied away from the Brahnan plan Estimates on the probable cost ranged from billion a year to billion a year And they were all experts doing the esti mating too A University of Illinois econo mist approached the cost subject in this manner recently The estimated price support level on hogsfor 1950 is a hundred pounds Suppose the ac tual market price averaged only In such case each hog pro ducer would be given an addi tional a hundred for the hogs he sold On a 250 pound hog that would a head On a typi cal years marketing of 70 million hogs the cost would be mil lion Hogs represent from a 7th to an 8th of the total output of American farms If payments on other i products ran about the same the total cost of the Bran nan plan would exceed billion a year If there is in America an accredited economist willing to stake his reputation on the work ability of the Brannan plan I havent heard about him Demos Shied Away From It The last congress took a strange attitude toward the administra tions farm program Although tfcere was a pronounced demo cratic majority not enough votes could be mustered to give the Brannan bill a trial even on a limited or 2 or 3 crops Toward the end of the session Clinton Anderson Brannans pre decessor and assumedly a spokes man for the administration came through with a stopgap farm bill which was in fact a modification of the Aiken bill passed by the previous republican congress This measure calls for price supports to the extent of 90 per cent of parity under the oldtime method of determining parity as distinguished from the Brannan formula which takes 10 of the past 12 years as a basis SureFire VoteGetter At the start of the present ses sion of congress there is talk in administration circles of vigorous efforts to have the Brannan bill adopted But its mostly talk Some of the politically smart boys at the presidents side know full well that the Brannan plan is worth more as a campaign issue than as an accomplished fact Theyre not sure about the latter but they do know that promising farmers high prices and the con suming public low prices at one land the same time is a surefire formula for votegetting I If farm organizations can he as I turned to speak the voice of agri Iculture farmers themselves are strongly against the Brannan 8plan Every major farm organi Szation except Farmers I taken a vigorous in opposition to it I COW Internal Cancer I the Farm Bureau most farm economists assert ItKat the Brannan plan would extensive control of agri by the government vir inevitable The Grange has denounced it as an internal can 1 CONTINUED ON PAGE 2 Truman Asks This Paper Consists of Two One No 78 Billion Budget About 43000 Soft Coal Miners on Strike 2 Weeks Seaworthy After Shelling in Pittsburgh About 43000 of the nations 400000 soft coal miners struck Monday singling out steel companies and one giant mining company as targets for the 2nd work stoppage in 2 weeks fay united mine worker members Without explanation from either UMW officials or rank and file miners refused to enter many pits in Pennsylvania West Virginia Ohio Kentucky Alabama and Virginia Soft coal bituminous diggers in western Pennsylvania led the parade More than 20000 are idle there in 36 mines which have a total productive capacity of 111 000 tons a day Mines Close A half dozen steel companies and the big Pittsburgh Consolida tion Coal company reported their mines were forced to close Practically all the 12000 UMW miners in eastern Ohio were stay ing away from work In Kentucky about 1200 idle miners were counted Only one PittConsol operation was turning out coal Mines operated by U S Steel and Republic Steel corporation were closed Five thousand miners stopped work in steel company pits in Ala bama Comment In Ohio UMW officials de clined comment But in Pittsburgh a union chieftain said the walkout was news to him UMW President John L Lewis has instructed his men to work 3 days a week even though the con tract expired last June 30 New Statement From Washington Lewis issued a new statement saying demands for government action in the coal dispute would oppress the mine workers and cripple theirunion He denounced Senator Taft R Ohio for urging presidential ac tion Taft wants Mr Truman to ask the courts to compel the min ers to work 5 days a week instead of 3 Lewis also criticized General Counsel Robert Denham of the national labor relations board as a hatchet man for the hiprofit tong Lewis statement did not touch Dn the new miners walkouts staged an unauthorized walkout Korean Tries Suicide After Killing Friend Dubugue student from Korea who was being held for what he called the code of honor killing of a fellow Korean was near death in a hospital Monday after slashing himself harikari fashion Police Chief Joseph H Strub said that Duk Sang Choi 36 slashed his wrists and laid open his abdomen in his jail cell Mon day morning At St Xavier hospi tal his condition was described as grave Strub said the student slashed himself with glass obtained by smashing a pair of spectacles which he requested for use in reading his Bible Duk Sang Choi was being held on an open charge in the dormi tory killing last Friday of his good friend Chun Kenn Oh 24 Both were University of Dubuque stu dents from Seoul Korea Chief Strub said Duk readily admitted slaying his friend and explained he did it under the Ori ental code of honor because he be lieved Chun had cashed a check belonging to Duk and for other grievances County Attorney Francis Beck er had said meantime that he planned to file a murder charge against Duk late Monday with ar raignment Tuesday In view of Duks condition however it was not certain whether this schedule would be followed Funeral services for Chun were held in University chapel here Monday with burial hi a local cemetery The services were au thorized by Chuns father in a transPacific telephone call from Seoul Sunday One Woman Burned in Blaze in Home Davenport O n e woman received minor burns and 5 per Illinois Miners Ending Walkout Springfield III UR Illinois United Mine Workers Monday ended their wildcat strike and re ported for work as ordered by un ion officials First reports from central Illi nois mines indicated that the men were entering the mines on sched ule Theyre reporting for work ovuur and it looks like they are going to work an official at a Peabody LjUstav Coal company mine here said from a sore throat together with Last week about 15000 of the sons escaped injury in a fire which partially destroyed a resi dence here Sunday night Firemen estimated damage at Burned in the fire was Mrs Esther Boyd 64 She is in St Lukes hospital in fair condition Those who escaped were her 4 grandchildren Grant 10 Gary 13 Gene 7 and Gale 2 and the childrens maternal grandfather U G Mason 76 GUSTAV HAS SORE THROAT Stockholm Sweden fP King was reported suffering TWeek about 15000 of the a raised temperature Sunday publicans to whom the letter was 23000 UMW workers in the state night A palace communique said sent He said he accepted at he was in comparatively good while the remainder of the soft general condition despite an at coal miners across the country tac bronchitis The monarch held to their 3day work week iis 91 Wayne Richardson Associ ated Press bureau chief in Hong Kong boarded the American freighter Flying Arrow bound for Shanghai on the first leg of a homeward journey He is the only newsman on board By WAYNE RICHARDSON Aboard the Flying Arrow Off Shanghai nationalist gunboats shelled this American freighter mercilessly Monday ren dering her unseaworthy with be tween 30 and 40 shell hits There were no casualties among the crew of 43 and 12 passengers Chinese nationalists gunboats blockading red held Shanghai stood guard over the Flying Arrow after the shelling From Taipei Formosa Chinese nationalist naval headquarters an nounced their warships detained the American freighter after the shelling A naval spokesman said the Chinese opened fire when the Flying Arrow ignored warnings to halt Numerous Fires Numerous fires were started aboard Sailors from the British sloop Black Swan boarded the Fly ing Arrow and helped the crew put out the fires Part of the ships cargo loaded in Hong Kong was dumped overboard when it caught fire Capt David Jones of Chicago no longer pronounced the ship seaworthy after inspecting the numeroXis shell holes Some large ones were just above the water line Captain Jones requested the ships owners the Isbrandtsen line of New York to ask the U S state department to intercede for safe passage to the nearest port for re pairs Shanghalisthe nearest port Asks Protection In New York H X Isbfandt spn president of the line called for protection of the Flying Arrow by U S naval units He said the shelling of the ship was entirely unlawful according to internation al law to standing naval regulations Isbrandtsen said the U S navy should protect Ameri can vessels on the high seas and I hope it will be done in this Most of the shelling took place on the high seas outside Chinese territorial waters Beardsley Receives Letter From GOP DCS Monies UR Gov William S Beardsley Monday received a letter from National Chairman Guy Gabrielson asking his views about a restatement of party pol icy and said he would like to have other republican governors views before replying Beardsley said he had taken no offense at Mr Gabrielsons oversight in not including him originally on the list of 52000 re face value the explanation of na tional GOP headquarters that his name was left off the list through a mailing room oversight WHITE SAILS IN THE Mannens Mason City was erinIaw Leonard Haijsman an ice boat ride late Sunday afternoon when this picture was taken at Clear Lake The boat was traveling an estimated 60 miles an hour in a stiff 35mileanhour wind Haijsman also of Mason City is no novice at ice boating In 1919 he owned one of the first ice boats on Clear Lake This Latine type boat was built by Mannens who has been ice boating on the lake since 1936 Other ice boating pictures on page 8 ESCAPED William Rettenmaier family sits dejectedly in a neighbors home in Fort Dodge Sunday after a fire earlier in the day drove them from the back of a 2story frame building where they lived Four persons perished in the blaze Left to right are Rettenmaier Catherine 13 Mrs Rettenmaier and Albert 6 Story on page 2 Ask for Ship to Repatriate Jap Soldiers Tokyo UR Russia in a sur prise move Monday asked Gen Douglas MacArthurs headquar ters for a vessel to repatriate 500 Japanese prisoners of war from Siberia Resumption of the soviet re patriation program was an nounced after the United States last week delivered a note to Moscow asking for a neutral in vestigation of what MacArthur called the tragic fate of 376000 Japanese still held in Russia Lt Gen Kuzma Derevyanko soviet member of the allied coun cil for Japan twice led his dele gation in a walkout from council sessions rather than discuss United States charges that the missing Japanese may have died in Russian hands Mo n d a ys announcement by MacArthurs headquarters said merely that the soviet member of the allied council sent a letter to headquarters asking for a ship to carry 2500 Japanese prisoners from Nahkodka Siberia on Jan 18 Early last year the Soviets an nounced that with the repatria tion of 95000 Japanese in 1949 the program would be completed The Russians said some 8000 Jap anese w a r criminal suspects would remain behind Weather Report FORECAST Mason City Cloudy Tuesday and turning colder in late afternoon Low Monday night 30 to J2 High Tuesday about 44 Iowa Partly cloudy Monday night Tuesday cloudy and windy with occasional rain southeast Not much change in temperature Low Monday night 38 southeast 32 northwest Minnesota Mostly cloudy Monday night with light snow north Tuesday cloudy and windy with snow north and central portions Little change in temperature except turning colder southeast Tuesday Low Monday night 010 above northwest 2025 southeast High Tuesday 5 be low to 5 above northwest and 3238 southeast IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics for the 24 hours ending at 8 a m Monday Maximum 39 Minimum 19 At 8 a m 20 YEAR AGO Maximum 40 Minimum 6 GlobeGazette weather statistics for the 24 hours ending at 8 a m Sunday Maximum 24 Minimum 4 At 8 a m YEAR AGO Maximum 43 Minimum 28 Investigation of Hospital Fire in Davenport Underway Davenport As a full scale investigation was un derway Monday by city state and county authorities into a fire early Saturday which cost the lives of 40 women in St Elizabeths hospital the mental ward of Mercy hospital of ficials said they were unable to determine whether any evi dence would be that may determine the ex act cause of the blaze Meanwhile the bodies of the 39th and 40th victims were tak en from the debris after the search was resumed when hos pital officials reported that 2 had not been accounted women for The death toll was placed at the 40 mark Sunday night by Scott county Coroner C H Wildman following an investigation which included a visit to the 6 mortu aries in Davenport by 3 mem bers of the hospital staff who had victims over a Hospital rec worked with the period of years ords also were rechecked to de termine the exact number of per sons who were in the hospital at the time of the blaze As a result of the tour 21bodies were partially identifiedand 11 were tentatively identified leav ing 8 in mortuaries asunidenti fied Coroner Wildman said Mon day Mercy hospital authorities said Monday that unidentified bodies would be buried in the cemetery on the hospital grounds Participating in the investiga tion which is being held behind closed doors in an assembly room in the basement of Mercy hos pital were Charles Cornell and George Stebbins inspectors for the state fire marshals office Fire Chief Lester Schick and Fire Marshal Othmar Mangels Build ing Inspector Alvin O Bargmann Scott County Attorney Clark O Filseth and Coroner Wildman Also attending the hearing was Attorney Howard E Kopf who said he was representing the hos piiai Acting as spokesman for the in vestigators Cornell the senior member of the investigators staff for the fire marshals office and who will be in charge of the hear ing told newspapermen that it has been the policy to hold closed hearings when witnesses are in terrogated in connection with in vestigations He said the purpose of the hear ing is a fact finding proposition and that among those to be inter viewed will be officials of the hos pital firemen patients and any other person who may be able to give some information that may be of value to the investigators Fayette County Recorder Is Dead West Union Munson of Hawkeye Fayette county re corder for the last 10 years died Sunday his home He is sur vived by his widow and a sou and daughter Services will be at Hawkeye Tuesday afternoon Makes Inquiry on Shortage of Home Coal Washington UR Rep H R Gross RIowa said Monday he has asked President Truman to determine why coalburning home owners are bearing the brunt of the coal shortage Gross in a letter to the presi dent said coal stocks held by all industrial users decreased 38 per cent in October while coal stocks held by retailer dealers dropped 286 per cent Is the coalburning home owner at the mercy of steel mills utili ties and railroads Gross queried Gross said it is difficult if not impossible to get the facts on the coal situation Government agen cies have an astonishing lackof uptodate figures Gross Why have steel companies ut tered no outcries for coal while retail dealers and home owners have he asked Sites for Music Meets Announced Charles City selec tion of Creston as the site for southwest Iowa competition all 4 locations for Iowas 1950 state high school area music contests April 22 have been chosen The sites were announced Mon day by Supt P C Lapham presi dent of the Iowa High School Music association which sponsors the events in which Iowas finest young musicians compete Offici als of the association met here over the weekend Along with Creston where Supt Burton R Jones is in chargethe sites are Northwest Lake Supt Arthur R Block in charge Northeast City Supt Lapham in charge Southeast Iowa Centerville Supt E W Fannon in charge Supt L A Logan Shenan doah again is state contest direc tor this year SAME WblU no traffic Si heari Says Hike in Tax Needed to Avoid Red But President Sets No Date for Balanced Budget By CHARLES MOLONY Washington Tru man Monday recommended a spending budget to congress He said it will plunge the government 55133000000 deeper into the red unless taxes are raised But even with moderate tax increase he wants the president set no date for a Balanced bud get The cold war with communist Russia takes the biggest spending That figure for the 1951 fiscal year beginning July 1 includes for from this for foreign aid The combined total is lower than current outlays Next in size comes cash for do mestic programs including Mr Trumans fair deal This figure jumps to 000000 The spending total is equivalent to for each man woman and child in todays population It is larger than last Januarys record peace time budget estimate but 000000 less than the 000 now expected to be spent by June 30 27000 Words The budget message read by senate and house clerks was the longest on words To legislators clamoring for less spending rather than more taxes Mr Truman stressed the import ance of federal dollars to an ex panding domestic economy He said his program embracing a moderate tax increase is pru dent and provides a solid base for moving toward budgetary balance in the next few years The president set no target for balancing governments in come and spending The white house said the administration tax bill is still under draft and would be ready for congress in a few days It is an honest budget which meets the realitieswhich face us Mr Truman said We have made and shall make more progress toward a less threatening world Our strength is not being impaired by our present great responsibili ties and the temporary deficits re quired to meet them Irresponsible and shortsighted budgetary action could contribute to a worsening ef the world situ ation and to a decline in produc tion and employment in the Unit ed States he continued Offers Idea Even before he spoke Chair man Cannon DMo of the house appropriations committee offered a budget balancing idea Cut spending by and raise taxes the same amount Also a planning organization of businessmen the committee for economic development came out for a billion dollar cut in excise taxes and another cut of equal size in the double tax in corporation earnings It further proposed sav ings in expenditures on veterans defense foreign programs and housing Mr Truman sketched the make up of 1951 spending in broad strokes He charged off nearly 000000 or the 71 per cent his budget alloted to national defense foreign affairs veterans programs and interest costs of the federal debt with these words Financial requirements to pay the costs of past wars and to achieve a peaceful world Would Cost Less These 4 cold war and after mathofwar items all told would cost less in the next iiscal year than in this one Then he discussed the nearly in domestic pro grams that constitute the other 29 per cent of his budget and con tain at their core his welfare goals He said the money assigned these programs has been generally recognized by con gress to necessary contributions of the federal gov ernment in our modern economy The military defense program alone was budgeted for 000000 spending in fiscal 1951 an increase of over this year Foreign aid registered the biggest decline from this down to a 1951 to tal of The aftermath of war costs also declined Veterans at fi 080000000 would get 000 less than this year The an nual interest charge on the debt off slightly would cost 000000 Would Cancel Cut But the increased cost of Hit domestic programs Mr Truman wants to enlarge would cancej out   

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