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Mason City Globe Gazette: Friday, April 9, 1948 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - April 9, 1948, Mason City, Iowa                                THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS KILC MASON CITY IOWA FRIDAY APRIL 9 1948 This Paper Consists of Two SectionsSection One No 15C RUMAN ASKS MEAT NEGOTIATIONS Leading i JudffeGranta INHINnTinN TP Leading Opponents by Strong Margin In his race for renomination Governor Robert E Blue now has a substantial lead over W S Beardsley and R E Longslaff his republican opponents This is shown in figures released Friday by the IOWA PUBLIC OPINION PANEL Opinions of panel members show that so far Sen George A Wilson is also well ahead of John Calhoun for the republican sen atorial nomina tion But Wilson has more to fear than Blue in the general election next fall Wil son will have a tough battle against his probable democratic opponent Guy Gillette of Cherokee Blue will have an easier race against Carroll Switzer Polk county at torney and probable democratic nominee for governor Senate Battle Looms This statewide crosssection of voters was asked Which of these candidates for U S senator do you prefer The replies Wilson Gillette Calhoun Undecided All Voters 40 34 6 20 GOP Only 67 10 10 13 The count on democratic voters alone for senator or for governor is not shown since Gillette and Switzer are at present unopposed 1or the nominations Voters who now support Cal houn divide about equally be twecn Wilson and Gillette for 2nd choice And more of the 20 per cent now undecided classify themselves as democrats than as republicans That means Gillette will probably get more support ihie group ih Wilson So this adds up to a close race for U S senator next fall It divides now WILSON 54 GILLETTE 4fi Blue For Ahead The panel divides as follows on the question Which of these candidates is your choice for gov ernor of Iowa All GOP Voters Only Blue 57 74 Switzer 13 3 Beardsley 6 7 Longstaff 4 3 Undecided 20 13 In spite of Blues strong show ing a little over 3 per cent do not name any preferred candidate and are classified as undecided but volunteer their support for any body but Blue In his race as well as the one for senator more voters now un decided classify themselves as democrats than as republicans This means Switzer will gain more than Blue from votes cast by this group but as the race stands now Blue has what looks like a safe lead over the man who is credited with cleaning up Polk county Among voters with opinions iliis race now stands as follows BLUE 76 SWITZER 24 Attitudes Can Change With the June primary 2 months off there is ample lime for close races 1o develop in the nomina tions for both offices IPOP will report on these races from time to time during these 2 months Several factors should be consid ered in evaluating present strength of the candidates Other hopefuls can still enter the political races in Iowa any time until April 28 In the early stages of a cam paign the man in office usually has a lead over his opponents since he is better known The Calhoun and Beardsley supporters have just recently gone into action Copr IDIS Central Surveys Inc Iowa Boy Dies After Car Plunges Down Bank DCS Moincs 17 year old boy died in a hospital early Fri day of injuries received when his car plunged down a 15foot em bankment near Des Moines Thurs day night He was Thomas Robinson who suffered a skull fracture and in ternal injuries in the mishap A passenger in the car Philip Wood 16 suffered internal injur ies Deputy Arvid Mellin said the car skidded some distance on the gravel road before going down the embankment ODT REDUCES COAL BURNING TRAINS TO 50 Cutback Is Effective Midnight April 15 If UMW Strike Continues Washington The 26day old mine shutdown forced the government Friday to order coal burning rail service cut to half of normal The reduction is effective at midnight April 15 and presum ably would be cancelled if mining resumes before then There appeared no immediate prospect however of an end of the walkout despite a new threat of action against John L Lewis and his United Mine Workers Rep Hartley RN J said that iC the TaftHartley labor law which he helped write fails to put the brakes on Lewis he will ask for stiffer laws Hartley is head of the house labor com mittee The pending new cutback in coalburning freight and passenger train service was ordered by the office of defense transportation and the interstate commerce com mission to save dwindling plies of coal ODT said Wednesday the rail roads had stocks enough to last only 22 days The 25 per cent cut ordered Friday is in addition to a similar reduction put into effect earlier by ICC and ODT Those curtail ments have made approximately 70000 railroaders idle Coalburning locomotives nor mally handle about 45 per cent of the passenger trains and 65 per cent of the freight service The strike has crippled opera tions in other industries especial ly steel In all approximately 164 000 workers in various fields are idle in addition to the 400000 soft coal miners Kei Hartley iokl tho possibility of further congressional action aimed at Lewis hinges on what happens to the union leader when he answers a contempt cita tion in court Monday If it develops that the Taft Hartley law is inadequate to deal with him Ill proceed with hear ings immediately Hartley said The white house in the mean time said it had no comment on a published report that the admin istration has given up hope of ending the strike within the next 10 days READY TO picture shows some of the members of local union 38 of the United Packinghouse m the hallway outside the district court room Only 2 of the group actually took the stand Miss Alice bull iar right and Arthur Costeilo center with side GlobeGazette Photo Steel Auto Output Hit by Coal Tieup Pittsburgh and au tomobile production dropped Fri day as the nation waited to see if John L Lewis would call off the 26dayold soft coal strike in the face of federal contempt action Altogether nearly GOOOOO work ers were idle because of the dis pute between Lewis and the coal operators over SJOOamonth pen sions for the United Mine Workers Railroads have laid off almost 100000 shop workers and train men complying with government ordered cuts in coalburning train schedules More than 50000 were idled in steel and allied indus tries as steel furnaces were banked from lack of fuel In ad dition some 25000 hard coal min ers are striking in sympathy with the 400000 soft coal miners who began the walkout on March 15 Production of motor cars which fell 1500 units last week was re ported by Automotive News to be 3000 behind schedule this week Hundreds of thousands of tons of steel production have been lost Bethlehem Steel has slashed op erations by 50 per cent laying off 10000 men U S Steel has taken 38 open hearths out of production banked 9 blast furnaces and closed 6 rolling mills Republic Steel plans an 85 per cent pro duction slash at its Chicago plant Monday and will lay off 3 500 workers by the end of the week Defense Gets Top Billing by Senators Washington repub lican leaders agreed Friday to place military legislation ahead of all business Senator Taft ROhio said the senate will hcgiii consideration of temporary draft a larger air force universal military training or any other defense measure as soon as its armed services com mittee reaches an agreement Taft chairman of the republican policy committee said it might take ail next week and possibly 2 weeks to agree upon a bill These were highlight develop ments along the lengthening pre pares ness irom 1 The house armed services committee drew up a draft bill requiring registration of all men 18 through 30 but making only those 13 through 25 liable for 2 years service Veterans with a year or more war service would luive to register but would be exempt those with 90 days but less than a years service also would be exempt if th03 join reserve units of the army navy or air forces Forrestal who will testify at opening hearings Monday pro posed much the same legislation but his called for registration ol men up to 45 He was due to dis cuss the draft before the senate armed services committee Friday 2 The house appropriations committee raced into hearings on a bill to pour into a warplane expansion drive For restal put the highest priority label on these funds for the aii force and fleet aviation Chair man Taber RN Y is speeding action to have the bill ready for house consideration Tuesday 3 The white house told the war assets administration to hold up final disposition of unsold indus trial plants machine tools and other equipment needed for war production The stoporder was issued to permit the munitions board to survey the items in the next 30 days The board already has put 150 major plants under the national security clause re quiring them to be so kept as to be reconvertible to war use in 120 days 4 Secretary of the Navy Sulli van said President Truman will ask congress to boost merchant ship building funds from 000 to The added money would be for new vessels suitable for troop transport and for an increased tanker fleet 5 Mr Truman asked congress to increase the exportimport banks lending authority by 000000 to finance further econ omic development in Latin America to camera chairman of the unions strategy committee Names of 875 others were listed as witnesses however with the stipulation by attorneys that if called they would testify substantially the same as Miss Bull See Vcmdenberg Strength in Nebraska Presidential Test By JACK BELL AP Political Writer Omaha possibility de veloped Friday that Senator Ar thur says he isnt influence the result of Nebraskas GOP presi dential primary Vandenberg is one of seven whose names have been entered in next Tuesdays voting Nebraska republicans will say then what man they would like the party to nominate for president at the June Philadelphia convention The Michigan senator isnt campaigning In fact he tried to get his name withdrawn This was in line with his repeated state ments that he isnt a candidate and will not coaaive in a Graft movement But Nebraska politicians who know their way around say there is some strong sentiment in the Dewey Extends Tour Omaha Nebr ff Gov Thomas E Dewey of New York decided Friday to extend Ms Nebraska presidential primary campaign in order to tour the western part of the state Sat urday He was scheduled to close his 2 day drive in Omaha Friday night hut agreed to stay over at the urging of Republican State Chairman A T Howard of Scottsbluff The decision was reached after Dewey found he could fly Saturday to North rialtc Alliance and Scottshluff state for llic chairman of the sen ate foreign relations committee These politicians do not suggest lhat Vandenberg without any campaign or any organi zation and without being a candidate can top the list of pos sible nominees in the balloting here But they do contend that he is likely to be among the top four The 3 leaders generally are ex pected to he Harold E Stassen Who walked away with the Wis consin primary Gov Thomas E Dewey of New York and Senator Robert A Taft The politicians here havent figured out yet which of the 3 would be hit hardest by an unex pectedly large Vandenberg vote Stassen who has been unstint ng in his praise ofVandenbergs record hinted at a news confer ence here Thursday lie thinks the vote cast for some of those who arent campaigning in Nebraska may cloud the primary outcome MacArthur who gathered in S delegates to Stassens 19 in Wis consin is not looked upon as much of a factor in the contest here Sfassen told reporters that while ie thinks the race is between him self Dewey and Taft if any of the others run close the question will be raised whether that affected the final outcome Stassen appeared confident as he continued a series of speeches in which he planned to wind up his personal appearance campaign at Fremont Friday night While in Wisconsin it was a case of Stassen fighting for his political lite now it is a case of Dewey making a lastditch fight Deweys supporters conceded privately that unless the New York governor tops the list here he will be out of the running for the G O P nomination The ef fect o2 defeats in a row they said cost him the secondary even some port among delegates he needs to win the nomination Iowa College Bows to Changing Times Switches to Westmar Le Mars college here has decided that the academic world and the commercial world cannot become one world So Western Union had the name 48 chang ing its name to Westmar college The change becomes effective immediately The announcement followed a 2 year survey and study concerning the colleges name The name Western Union was chosen when the school was founded here in 1000 B F Zuehl clean of the college said it carried out the idea of the colleges estab lishment by joint action of 5 middle western conferences of the Evangelical church 86052100080 WHEAT CROP Wasijington agricul ture department Friday forecast this years winter wheat crop at 860521000 bushels This estimate is an increase of 21000000 bushels from a depart ment forecast of 839000000 bush els made shortly after the plant ing season last December It compares with last years winter wheat crop of 1007000000 bushels and with the 10year 193746 average of 088606000 bushels No forecast was given for spring wheat inasmuch as the planting season is just drawing to a close But officials have said a sprinff crop of 272000000 bushels is pos sible Injunction Is Issued at Ottumwa Ottumwa writ of tem porary injunction was signed by District Judge Harold V Levis Fri day directed against striking CIO workmen at John Morrell Co The writ orders the local pack inghouse union to restrain from mass picketing building barricades and interference traffic in and out of the plant Four cars taken from the plant Thursday remained on the Mil waukee railroad tracks just out side the plant where they were halted Thursday when pickets placed barriers on the rails Following removal of a carload of bacon Tuesday the union had withdrawn maintenance men from the plant ana ordered pickets TO bar anyone from entering or leav ing it South St Paul Yards Reopen for Business South St Taul Minn South St Paul stockyards re opened for business Friday for the first time since start of a nation wide strike of CIO meat packers March 16 But both management and the United Packinghouse Workers union indicated the reopening would be shortlived UPW pickets at the adjacent Swift and Co plant again made no attempt to stop cattle trucks The livestock marketing com mittee emphasized that the yards were reopening for very limited handling It stressed that farmers must ob tain clearance before they could bring livestock to the yards Head Farm Bond Sales DCS Aloines C Glenn Mitchellville farmer has been ap pointed Iowa farm director of the savings bond division of the treasury department j Steal pipe is made in diameters from 0125 up to 30 inches and in lengths from a few feet to 45 feet Finds Jap Farewell Ritual Is Real Weddina San Francisco SAME BUtk traffic duttk In put S4 fcouri San Francisco T Efaersole a former navy com mander who said he unwittingly went through a Shinto wedding ceremony with a redhaired army intelligence assistant while sta tioned Jn Tokyo had the mar riage annulled Friday Ebersole 34 a socially promin ent San Francisco chain store ex ecutive said he thought the ritual was a Japanese farewell ceremony But about a month ago his bride Elizabeth Church of Seattle Wash had the elaborate scroll presented her after the ceremony translated II was a Shinto mar riagre certificate Miss Church told me she wanted her name cleared so I went to a lawyer and had the marriage annulled Ebersole explained Ebersole who has a wife and 3 children said he and Miss Short became interested in Shinto cus toms while in Japan He was sep arated from his wife at the time he snid His wife later obtained a divorce but they have been re conciled since the war Ebcrsole said lie and Miss Church received orders to come home at about the same time A Japanese friend heard of their im pending departure and told them he had arranged a beautiful Japanese going away ceremony for us Ebersole said The ceremony was conducted an the friends house by a Shinto priest m flowing Oriental robes and conical hat was mumbling ivords that we could not understand Eber sole said Attendants were play injr on flutes and sounding brass jrongrs just stood there Sev eral times the priest bowed aimost to the floor as the temple music continued It all lasted about 20 minutes Then the priest handed Miss Church what looked like a mimeo graphed piece of paper with Japa nese characters on it I didnt know what it said Ebersole said he and Miss Church then returned to their re spective quarters and both re turned to the United States short ly afterward Ebcrsoles wife said she would accept his explanation of the in cident Weather Report FORECAST Mason City Partly cloudy and warmer Friday night and Sat iirclay Low Friday night 35 High Saturday 68 Iowa Partly cloudy and warmer Friday night and Saturday Low Friday night 40 to 45 west 35 1o 40 east High Saturday 72 to 76 west 68 to 72 east Minnesota Considerable cloudi ness and warmer Friday night and Saturday with showers be ginning in the Red river valley Saturday or Saturday night Iowa 5 Day Weather Outlook Temperatures will average slightly above normal north portion 4 to 6 degrees above normal south portion Normal highs 57 north 62 south Nor mal lows 33 north 38 south Warmer Friday night and Sat urday and in south and cast portions Sunday Cooler Mon day Monday night Becoming warmer around Wednesday Precipitation will be moderate averaging onetenth to two tenths of an inch west three tenths to fivetenths of an inch east Scattered showers Sunday night and Monday IN MASON CITY Globe Gazette weather statistics for 24 hour period ending at 8 o clock Friday morning Maximum 44 Minimum 2i 39 32 Maximum Minimum Judge Grants Injunction at Decker Plant Nearly 900 witnesses were listed in the Armour injunction suit when it came to an end in dis trict court Thursday afternoon with the announcement by Judge William P Butler that he would issue a temporary injunction the first of the week against the United Packinghouse Workers lo cal union 38 The injunction will not change the present situation however at torneys admitted Since March 27 the union has been under a re straining order issued by Judge Butler which prohibited the mem hers from mass v picketing or in terfering with traffic in or out of the plant The injunction it is ex pected will have exactly the same provisions Only 24 of the 899 witnesses listed actually came to the stand in district court during the hear ing Wednesday and Thursday The names of 875 other members of the u n i o n were entered on the court records however with R F Ciough attorney for Armour Company stipulating that they would have testified substantially the same as Miss Alice Bull 1 of the 4 called by the defense Miss Bull testified that she was a member of the union having been employed for 15 years in the trimming room of Jacob E Decker and Sons that she had never pick eted during this strike that she had attended meetings of the members but that she had never heard any vote taken to stop any one from going in or out of the plant Faced with approximately 50 union members and prospective witnesses mostly women who were sitting in the courtroom Ciough arose and offered to stip ulate that other witnesses Defense Attorney E G Dunn might call would testify substantially the same Dunn accepted the offer and then rested his case There was some discussion be tween attorneys and the judge novrcvcr concerning in sistence that any decree entered by the court should not apply to the members of the union individ ually since most of them were in nocent of any infraction of the law Judge Butler finally announced in open court that it was his opin ion that the plaintiff is entitled to an injunction against the union as a class and that an injunction will be issued against all members of the class He wanted it understood Judge Butler said that noone could go out and violate the injunction with immunity just because he had not been mentioned individually I personally am of the opinion that he officers of this union in tended that the strike should be carried on in a lawful manner the judge said hut added that it also appeared from the evidence that some members and some of ficers had been guilty of mass picketing and interference with traffic at the plant Other defense witnesses called Thursday afternoon were Arthur Costeilo chairman of the unions strategy committee and Clarence Ramsey cochairman Coslello testified that to his knowledge no union officer had ever told a picket to stop anyone from going in or out of the plant He said that the strategy commit tee had met with the city council and mayor before the strike and agreed that it would be carried on in a peaceful manner and that po lice were to be sent to the plant to remove any nonunion members who might make trouble during the strike The chairman also testified that when 15th N E was blocked on the afternoon of Friday March 26 it not at the regular picket post and that regular pickets did not take part He added thai Plant Manager P J Thorgerson and 9 or 10 foremen were in the crowd which filled the street from curb to curb Costeilo and Ramsey repeated the testimony previously given by Charles Kranz acting chairman of the union that 15 or 20 foremen rushed from the plant property to stand on the tracks on the evening of March 26 and helped stop a switch engine from entering the plant AntiLynching Bill Gets Top Priority Washington Republican senators voted Friday to give a federal antilynch bill top priority m the senate among civil rights measures It probably will be offered on the senate floor in the next few weeks Senator Tail ROhio said an ulynch was placed ahead of anti poll tax and antidiscrimination measures because the GOP sena tors believe jt will bo theeasiest 1o pass INJUNCTION TO HALT WALKOUT IS HELD BACK President Appeals to Union and Packers to Try for Settlement Washington Truman asked the striking CIO packing house workers and the major meat companies Friday to renew negotiations in an effort to settle their wage dispute The president thus decided for the time being at least not to seek an injunction to end the meat in dustry strike which started March 16 He made his appeal after the white house released the report of an inquiry board analyzing the dispute Mr Truman said that if the parties will study the report with an open mind it can pro vide a basis for renewed negotia tions looking toward a prompt settlement of the dispute Mr Trumans brief statement said he has asked Cyrus S Ching director of the federal mediation service to arrange further confer ences in the light of the informa tion contained in the board re port Between 60000 and 80000 CIO packing house workers walked out march 16 at 138 meat pack ing plants after rejectingan of fer of a 9 cent an hour wage in crease The union originally asked a 29cent an hour boost but later offered to settle for 19 cents The inquiry boards report turned over to Mr Truman Thurs day made no recomemndations That is in accordance with the TaftHaftley law which it was created Based on the bureau of labor statistics price index the board said the 9cent wage offer was adequate to meet the rise in cost of living since the last wage raise in June 1947 But the board baici the union warned mareiuonev m order to improve the workers living standard Summarized the boards state ment of the position of both sides is this The contend that their wage offer is fair and adequate The union on the other hand demanded 29 cents an hour and based this on the premise that Use employes were entitled to an increase in real wages in order to advance their living standards For this purpose the union adopted the approach of using a citys workers family budget re cently published by the bureau of labor statistics The union said this budget showed that 29 cents is justified and that even such an increase would assure only about onethird of the packinghouse workers of the ability to earn in a 40hour week enough to support a family containing one child at the level permitted by the BLS family bud get The inquiry board said the union made a series of proposals Ihe board said in the case of Swift with which the union con ducted its most detailed negoti ations the union offered to settle successively for 29 cents cents 19 cents and indicated at least ai interest in a possible settlement at 1G cents n mit spurned by the CIO workers was accepted by 2 other unions the AFL meatcul ters and the national brotherhood of packinghouse workers which is affiliated with the confederated unions of America at Oliver to Talk Strike Charles City discussion on whether to call for a strike vota among its office worker member ship at the Oliver plant here will be held at a meeting Tuesday oC the CIO Farm Equipment and Metal Workers Local 222 it was announced Friday E L Kunkle president of the local said negotiations with the farm machinery corporation have reached a stalemate with dis agreement over wage increases the mam block to a settlement Ne gotiations are still going on CIO local us which represents some oQO Oliver Production Workers voted recently to i7c the union bargaining commit tee to call a strike whenever the committee deems it necessary The 2 are asking 15 cents hourly increases or either of 2 alternative plans which provide for down payments on the indus try wide wage pattern now beinir negotiated in the farm   

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