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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: October 24, 1947 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - October 24, 1947, Mason City, Iowa                                NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES AIL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS i nod Pnlttd firm full LetMd Wlrw Cents Copyl MASON C1TT IOWA FRIDAY OCTOBER Z4 1947 Paper Consists of Two No 13 FOREST FIRES SWEEP MAINE AREA QUOTA SYSTEM INDICATED FOR EXTRA SESSION Congreu Greets Call With Willingness to Tackle Soaring Prices Washington UR Congress greeted President Trumans call for a special session Friday with signs of willingness to tackle the problem of high prices but with out reviving price controls and rationing From both the white house and congress came indications that serious consideration would be given to attacking the price prob lem through an allocation pro quota system for buyers of steel grain and other scarce goods The aim would be to pre vent big buyers from bidding freely against each other and thereby forcing prices up Despite the great interest in prices there was no evidence that congress would shy away from the accompanying foreign relief problem although the republican majority will demand a detailed case to support requests for emer gency aid It was understood that the ad ministration may ask for about including 000000 to help carry France and Italy through the winter Mr Trumans proclamation called for the legislators to con vene at noon Nov 17 in the first special session since 1939 Speak ing over all major radio net works at 9 p m CST Friday night the president will explain his decision to recall congress to consider the alarming and con tinuing increase in prices and the economic crisis in western En rope The situation shaped up this way 1 While the initial congression al reaction was one of guarded co operation re publican stiolrestnerr treated the congressional call with reserve while they awaited more detail on administration proposals 2 Government sources indicated that Mr Truman would ask auth ority to allocate grains steels coal nitrogen fertilizer scarce machinery and certain other com modities among foreign and do mestic users The plan would rest Power Dive in Airplane Ends Deafness for 12YearOld Girl Minneapolis Ann Berger 12 years old was learning what sounds meant Friday For the first time in her life the darkhaired school girl was able to hear Experimental radium treatments first were used to open her deaf ears Then an airplane power dive was used to tear the scar tissue away from her eardrums As the airplane roared downward sound cut through Joyces deaf ness She screamed More radium treatments were given and high pitched whistles street cars and sharp shrieking noises could be heard by her on the ground as well as in the air Her parents Mr and Mrs Otto Berger both 36 said that since Joyce began hearing sounds of the everyday world last week she now had to learn to hear Taft Formally Tosses Hat in Ring for Presidential Kace Describes Race as Wide Open as He Makes Bid for GOP Nomination on hopes that prices would fall if buyers were limited to their quo tas and not allowed to bid against one another for scarce goods 3 Sen Ralph E Flanders R Vt chairman of a joint congres sional economic subcommittee in vestigating prices disclosed that he had made plans to consult ex perts on allocation programs this weekend Flanders subcommittee expects to finish a report on ways of dealing with the price problem within 10 days 4 On the foreign aid frontre sponsible administration officials said congress would be asked to provide at least in new money for France this win ter for Italy 000 to for Austria and that it may be asked to provide for additional occu pation costs 5 There appeared only a small minority in congress that would support a move to resurrect price controls and rationing The CIO political action committee and Americans for democratic action issued statements demanding such action as the only real solution to high prices 6 Labor spokesmen said a sub stantial cut in living costs result Ing from congressional action probably would result in indefin itely delaying demands for a 3rd round of wage increases 7 Republican leaders left the door open to bringing up their personal income tax reduction bill during the special session but indicated it would rank in priority behind foreign aid and high prices Washington Rob ert A Taft of Ohio formally an nounced his candidacy Friday for the 1948 republican presidential nomination describing the race as wide open Tafts longexpected formal entry was contained in a letter to Fred B Johnson chairman of the Ohio republican state committee The committee and other Ohio GOP groups had urged him to make the race last July 31 The letter was written before President T r u m a ns announce ment to Taft and other congres sional leaders that he was calling a special session of congress Nov 17 Most of the money for Tafts campaign is expected to be raised in Ohio Leaders there are report ed to have set a goal of with Taftunwilling to accept con tributions exceeding In his letter Taft said he the pledge of support of the Ohio state committee Ohio will have 53 delegates to the na tional nominating convention in Philadelphia where 547 wilftbe necessary for a nomination Ohios delegation Will be chosen in a pri mary next May 4 been encouraged by nu merous offers of support from all parts of the country the nomination race is wide open on the basis of ob servations made on his recent western tour and that the winner will be picked among many able and competent republicans free SENATOR TAFT Presidency Wilson and Martin Favor Congress Call Des Moines fP Two Iowa members of the United States con gress Thursday agreed that the special session of congress called by President Truman was a good thing but had different reasons for thinking so Sen George Wilson said in Des Moines he believed the president is quite right in getting congress back into session With the apparent secrecy the present administration I know of no other way to get the infor mation to the people as to what is going on other than to have the congress reconvene he said In Keokuk Hep Thomas E Martin said he would welcome the special session because he be lieved some action on European relief had to be taken He said however that congress must not be stampeded into a hasty decision before a full and accurate anal by a convention acting as a deliberative body WOMAN DIES OF CRASH INJURIES MrsRuthGerlach37 Succumbs in Hospital Charles services for Mrs Ruth Gerlach 37 who died at p m Thursday from injuries in a trainauto crash the night before will be held Mon day at 2 p m The Rev Walter M Fritschel of St Pauls Lutheran church will officiate at Gross manns chapel Burial in River side cemetery Delores Pepper 13 daughter of Mrs Gerlach had regained con sciousness in a Charles City hos pital Friday morning and was ported In fair condition She suffered a depressed compound fracture of the skull and under went an operation Thursday night The car in which they were rid ing driven by Mrs Gerlachs husband Emil Gerlach 47 col lided with an eastbound Milwau kee fast freight loaded with meat at an intersection in Charles City The train struck the Gerlach car broadside Mr Gerlach suffered 6 or 8 broken ribs and an injury to a kidney SAME Black means traffic death in past 24 hours Injured by Furnace Des Moines Wilson 18 of Madrid was in a local hos pital Friday with internal injuries suffered when a furnace fell on him as it was being taken from a truck Thursday Wilson who fered internal injuries regained consciousness Thursday night and was reported in good condition Arrest Driver in Blairsburg Death Crash Webster City UB Romaine Gehrke 22 Iowa Falls Friday was bound over to the Hamilton county grand jury after pleading not guilty to a charge of failing to stop and give aid at the scene of an accident Gehrkes bond was set at He was charged in connection with the death of Byron Jones 15 in a rarbicycle accident near Blairsburg Wednesdaynight Sheriff E R Lear who arrested Gehrke late Thursday said the youth1 admitted he was the driver of a car which struck the bicycle Jones and Charles Lentz 14 se riously injured were riding double on the vehicle Lear quoted Gehrke as saying he was too scared to stop and drove off leaving the boys in a ditch alongside the highway How ever he rejected the theory he had placed the boys in the ditch Hamilton county authorities were aided in the arrest of Gehrke by Murrell Hayden also of Iowa Falls who notified police after seeing a car with a broken head light in a repair shop Police ar rested the youth at his home after identifying him as the owner of the car Gehrke was being held in the county jail Lear said 4 Wildlife President to Launch Survey in Iowa Des Moines Ira N Gabrielson president of the Wild life Management Institute Wash ington will launch a survey here the latter part of next month of the setup and programs of the Iowa Conservation commission G L Ziemer director of the commission said Thursday he had received a letter from Gabrielson announcing the approximate time of his arrival His services to the state will be free Ziemer said GRAIN MARKET PRICES SLUMP TO FULL LIMIT Report Farmers and Elevator Operators Offering More Supplies By THE ASSOCIATED FRESS Heavy selling swept the grain and cotton exchanges Friday in reaction to President Trumans call for a special session to com bat soaring prices wheat corn and oats plunging the permissible limit on the Chicago board of trade Grain prices tumbled in the most active trading in several weeks Cash dealers reported farmers and country elevators were offering increased supplies of cash corn and oats for shipment later After an hour of trading wheat was about 9 to 10 cents lower on the Chicago board of trade the latter decline the limit permitted underexchange rules corn was down 6i cents to 8 cents the limit and oats were 6 cents lower the limit December wheat sold at December corn and Decem ber oats A rally developed after grains hit the bottom and wheat later was 51 to 6J centsunder Thurs days close December selling at S3061 corn was 5 to 6 cents lower December and oats were 31 to 5 cents lower December Soybeans were down the 8 cents limit November Cotton futures opened to a bale lower in New York and midmorning prices were to a bale lower than the previous close Reports that congress might be asked to require higher down pay ments for speculative buying on the grain exchanges and authorize the allocation of scarce coimsodi ties had a depressing effect on grain prices Cotton traders were reported fearing the free market in cotton might be affected by the proposed program December wheat was quoted at to a bushel corn was 2J to 4 cents lower December FOREST FIRE soldier views all that is left of the large Hotel jfalvernTn Bar Harbor Me after a disastrous forest fire swept the summer resort and oats were J to 2J cents lower December 4Engine Plane Crashes in Utah Salt Lake City United Airlines announced here Friday that one of its 4engine transport planes enroute from Los Angeles to Denver crashed in Bryce Can yon in southern Utah Sam Kellogg district manager said he did not know how many persons were aboard He said the pilot radioed that a fire was burning in the tail sec tion of his plane and he was at tempting a forced landing However Kellog said he was unable to land and the plane crashed and apparently burned NATION HIT BY FIRES DROUTH Kansas Oklahoma and Texas in Dry Spell By UNITED PRESS The 23day drought threatenin the nations wheat meat and tim ber supplies continued to burn th soil and the forests Friday onl partly relieved by showers i some sections of the midwest Forest fires raging in 10 north era states have burned off mor than 100000 acres of timberland made 5500 homeless and cause property damage well over 000000 Nine persons died as result of the fires in the last 2 hours and Fri day in Iowa southwestern Minne sota eastern Kansas and western Missouri However none was con sidered heavy enough to benefi the soil and there was no rainfal in the worst drought areas o western Kansas Oklahoma and the Texas panhandle o AUII aim cumulate mitti rurmo ysis of needs abroad can be made I inches The average yearly rainfall on Formosa is between 75 and 80 LOOK INS IDE Turkey Charges Russia With Warmongering See page 2 High Costs Exemptions to Raise Taxes in 48 See page 14 Gophers May Provide Test for Wolverines See page 9 VA a Month Vets Overpay See page 4 Find 6 lowans Guilty in Protest Over Negro Glenwood JP Six pacific Junction young men found guilty of violently and twnultously as sembling to do an unlawful act awaited sentencing Friday They were convicted by an all male jury of 6 Thursday in the justice court of William P Albee on charges which resulted from their attempt to defend a Negro ordered to leave town by Mayor John J Lutter The jury recommended how ever that any fine or penalty imposed should be suspended Maximum penalty is fine or 30 days in jail Justice Albee said he would pronounce sentence Sat urday afternoon The freak warm weather ae companying the long dry spel was broken by a cold wave from Canada that tumbled temper atures 35 degrees in 12 hours In New York a record high of 846 in thelate afternoon fell off to 50 by morning On the west coast a storm o hurricane intensity with wind over 100 miles an hour was re ported moving toward the main land of Alaska and British Co lumbia Maine was hardest hit by the weather Forest fires leveled re sort homes in both the northern and southern parts of the state Six persons were killed The au thor artist and millionaire colony of Bar Harbor and other towns on Mt Desert Island were lef charred ruins Damage was esti mated at 17000000 In the rest of New England New Hampshire reported many homes destroyed in the Rochester area with damage near Minnesota has had 700 forest fires during the drought with 40 000 acres burned Michigan re ported 1339 fires had destroyed 16790 acres and 3 firefighters were killed there Thursday A few fires continued to burn in Wiscon sins woodlands Early American settlers substi tuted semitransparent animal skins for glass windows in their homes Russ Hold Brazil Envoy as Hostage London Moscow radio reported Friday night that Russia had made hostages of the former Brazilian ambassador and his staff there to insure the safe departure from Brazil of the Russian em bassy staff in Rio de Janeiro The Brazilian government broke off diplomatic relations with Russia last Tuesday because of derogatory comment in the soviet press about President Eurico Gas par Dutra The Brazilian ambassador to Moscow was Mario Pimentel Bran dao Recommend Speed Curb for 2 Mason Lake Road Safety Conference Also Favors Limit for 12 Other Highways Des Moines IP The sta highway commission will be askec to try experimentally the impos tion of speed limits on 13 stretche of major highways The recommendation that sue action be taken was made as th result of a safety conference Fr day attended by representatives o the state public safety departmen the highway commission and th state commerce commission W O Price highway commis sion traffic engineer said th number of experimental stretehi to be set up would depend upo highway commission action Price added that the speed lira its would vary on different high ways but that it would be th same both day and night an jrobably would be somewhere be ween 50 and 60 miles an hour Recommended for the expert ments were Nos 106 and 18 Mason City t Clear Lake No 6 Oakland to Council Bluffs No 30 Dunlap to Missouri Val ey No 75 Council Bluffs to Mis iouri Valley No 71 Spencet to Spirit Lake No 75 Le Mars south to Wood uryMonona county line No 20 Sioux City to Gushing No 20 west of Fort Dodge t Blairsburg Junction of Nos 218 and 30 eas o Lisbon No 20 Cedar Falls to Waterloo No 20 Dubuque to Dyersville No 150 Hazelton to Oelwein No 6 Grinnell to Mitchellville 25 KILLED IN LONDON WRECK 2 Commuter Trains Collide During Fog London comrriuter acked suburban electric trains ollided in a dense iog Friday morning killing at least 25 per ons and injuring more than 100 thers Croydon Mayday hospital near st to the scene of the crash in outh Croydon said it had re eived 25 dead by a m Chief Ambulance Officer A L 11 said all the wore than 100 asualties had been carried away a 28 ambulances by 2 hours fter the crash Railway officials said one of the was probing its way slowly irough the fog toward South roydon when there suddenly was blinding flash and a grinding xplosion as a following train ammed into the rear of the first Kids Get Last Laugh as Teachers Flunk Test Denver IP Colorado school kids had the last laugh their teachers averaged a failing 67 on a test in American history The quiz wasnt particularly rough There were little matters such as which side did the Tories favor in the American revolution Who assassinated Lincoln And what do we call the first 10 amendments to the U S constitu tion Approximately 100 teachers were picked for the quiz at ran dom from some 6000 in town for the Colorado Education associa tion convention and assured their identities would be kept a deep1 dark secret The 25 questions were lifted from a standard test used by Den ver public schools and tossed every day at pupils But grades ranged as low as 20 out of a posible 100 or only 5 correct answers And boners were pulled that would make a lad sit ting under a dunce cap burst with pride at his own knowledge George Washington was given credit for drafting the declaration of independence singlehanded One teacher guessed Robert E Lee was president of the confederate states although the majority frankly didnt know who held that Civil war office Other misinformation supplied by the instructors included Aaron Burr assassinated Lin coln The Monroe Doctrine guaran teed equal rights to all Pocahontas married John Smith The U S acquired the western states from Spain in the Spanish American war The Civil war lasted 10 years And about half of those tested by Rocky Mountain news report ers replied that free education for all was guaranteed in the bill of rights which didnt even men tion education RUSSIA CHANGES ENVOY FOR U S Ambassador Friendly to America Is Removec London fP Nikolai V Novi kov regarded as an advocate o sovietAmerican friendship an cooperation has been remove as soviet ambassador to Washing ton the Moscow radio announce Friday The announcement said h would be succeeded by Alcxande S Panyushkin former Eussia ambassador to China The Mos cow account offered no explana tion of the move Novikov set forth his views o cooperation June 19 when h told the Chicago council of Amer icansoviet friendship that th United States and Russia couli live together peacefully despit differing economic systems The Soviet Union holds th view that it is not only possibl but desirable that there be co operation between the 2 nations1 he said at the time Novikov left the United State for Moscow July 27 Asked in Stockholm why he was returning he replied I cannot help you even if I knew how long I woulc be there Weather Report FORECAST Mason City Mostly cloudy with occasional showers F r i d a night becoming partly cloud and slightly warmer Saturday Low Friday night about 50 High Saturday about 58 Iowa Mostly cloudy with occa sional showers Friday nigh becoming partly cloudy Satur day Warmer Saturday Lov Friday night 45 east to 50 west High Saturday 65 east to 58 west owa 5Day Weather Outlook Temperatures will average nearly normal Normal maxi mum 55 north to 60 south Nor mal minimum 34 north to 38 south Warm Saturday and Sun day becoming colder Monday and Tuesday Precipitation will average1 i inch occurring as oc casional rain Sunday or Monday Minnesota Cloudy with little change in temperature Friday night occasional light rain ending early Friday night Sat urday partly cloudy and warmer IN MASON CITY IlobeGazette weather statistics for 24 hour period ending at 8 oclock Friday morning Maximum 59 Minimum 45 At 8 a m Friday 50 Precipitation 24 TEAR AGO Maximum 75 Minimum so Strike Curtails Diaper Service New York oneman rike has curtailed diaper deliv ry and building service to 3000 esidents of a Bronx apartment evelopment for the past 3 days illiam Creutz 49 superintendent the Amalgamated Housing cor oration said he set up his own Icket line when he was fired for lining a union The dorn rms kangaroo and the emu the Australian coatof 3500 PERSONS DRIVEN OUT OF ISLAND VILLAGE Death Toll Mounts to 9 as Property Damage Estimated Bar Harbor Maine fabled summer playground of the rich and 6 other communities were virtually wiped out Friday as strong winds fanned woodland fires ravaging New England into fresh fury with the death toll al ready at 9 and property damage mounting above A spectacular allnight evacua tion by land and peacetime Bar Harbor a descried town as 3500 townsfolk fled in fright before flames that leveled from 200 to 300 homes in cluding summer showplaces of the international society set Damage to the ruined mansions in this town alone was officially set at counting the loss of valuable art treasures and furnishings they contained As north winds blew up to a force of 25 miles an hour through out the region Friday gaining momentum all the the outlook was grim with still no appreciable amount of rain in night Light sprinkles are the best that can be expected before at least Saturday and probably in the view of wet down baked woodlands as the dry spell went into its 34th day While the raging flames were jhecked in Bar Harbor fears were expressed that perhaps it was only temporary All weve done is stop the fire n the town said Selectman Seth Libby A little more wind would raise a lot of hell Three New England states Maine Massachusetts and New Virtually on a wartime footing as national guardsmen Legionnaires and oth er agencies were called out to ight the flames and care for the housands of refugees Just before noon between 12 and 15 fires were reported still roaring out of control in Massa chusetts where the loss already is placed at well above In New Hampshire shifting winds were driving the flames di rectly at the heart of the indus rial city of Rochester at the foot of the White mountains With the edge of the fire within 2 miles of that city of 16000 school children were being kept concentrated in he event they have to be evacu ated Massachusetts state forester laymond J Kenney said our ate depends a lot on the weather and the if we held during the night in the teeth of hose winds I think we can hold anything Two thirds of the Bar Harbor efugees made their escape in the afternoon before the flames reach ed the road For 3 hours the island was cut ft In the belief that a mass by sea would be nec essary the navy and coast guard ent 10 oceangoing craft speeding o the port tfuring those 3 hours Abbott aid All we did was sit here and ray that theyd hold the fire way from the main part of the own and they held it Daniel McClay Bangor water works superintendent who was n the island told how bulldozers leared a path for the first convoy f refugees Huge boulders had toppled into e road from the tops of cliffs ned with flaming trees McClay aid and the bulldozers had to ush the rocks aside During the night the town was ghted only by the cheery glow re and one mobile lighting unit t the fire station When the situation first grew ntical 2000 townsfolk gathered athletic field The army told us to run to the thletic field in the afternoon aid Mrs Katherine Davis 40 It vas an awful Tinning through smoke with ousehold goods and crying babies n their arms Mrs Doris Walls said that while t the field the flames descended n the town like a roaring in erno The flames suddenly came own hill at us without warning urning the trees and shrubbery round the field she continued All of us fled for the town iand g At no time officials said were lose on the landing in danger New Lost Dog Wrinkle New York dogs had eir day when the National roadcasting System arranged to avc all such canines brought to studio and be televised for the nefit of any owner who might be Lined in   

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