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Mason City Globe Gazette: Monday, September 29, 1947 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - September 29, 1947, Mason City, Iowa                                NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH 10WANS NEIGHBORS VOL UH Anodatcd Prat and United Flea roll LcaMd Wires a Copy I MASON CITY IOWA MONDAY SEPTEMBER S9 1947 Thlj Pf Mr Conilsti of Two No 301 One Mans Opinion A Radio Commentary By W EARL HALL Managing Editor BROADCAST SCHEDULE KGJO MMOO City SnDdj p n WIAD QnLncy J m WO1 m WSU1 CUT a m WLCX La Crosie p m American Nations Bound by a New Tie AMERICAN relationships with the other nations making up the western hemisphere have en tered a new and important phase with the signing of the Rio de Janeiro treaty Under Its provisions all Ameri can nations bind themselves to joint action against all aggressors both outside and within the new world The new pact constitutes an of the agreements reached previous panAmeri can conferences held respectively at Buenos Aires in 1936 at Lima in 1938 at Panama in 1939 at Havana in 1940 and at Mexico City the socalled act of Chapul tepec in 1945 BEFORE entering a detailed dis cussion of the new pact it might be worth while to thumb back through the pages of history and pick out some of the high lights in the negotiations which got us to where we find ourselves today Well start with the Monroe doctrine enunciated about a cen tury and a quarter ago In that document with British prompting we said to the world that an at tack on any nation in either America would be looked upon as an attack upon us This was Americas policy for many decades It stemmed from a Big Brother attitude on Uncle Sams part This was a principal reason why the other Americas whom we agreed to protect never thought very highly of it yN the 1920s under the leader 1 ship of our ambassador to Mexico Dwight Morrow we en tered into a new relationship with the Latin American republics which came to be known as good neighborship Although the development of this policy is generally associated with the Roosevelt administration it was actually referred to in those terms good neighborship by President THoover The distinguishing mark of the new policy was its departure from the Monroe doctrine assumption of a paternal interest in our lesser neighbors Under good neighbor ship we became a partner with the least of them IN successive conferences pro ceeding from this goad neigh borship premise marked prog ress was accomplished in the 30s in the direction of strengthening the ties between United States and Latin America Then the war broke out in Eu rope in 1939 and each passing month it appeared the more like ly that we would be drawn into it In the face of this prospect we increased the tempo of our good neighborshipWe had to The danger that South Ameri ca would fall like a ripe plum into the Hitler basket was more than academic About this I can testify from firsthand observa tion I visited the principal coun tries of South America only a few months prior to Americas entry into the war OUR interest in the Latin American countries assumed a new form We began ladling out our dollars in copious quantities Our reasoning was that we must have South Americas friendship at a price In its essentials the friendship we enjoyed with Latin America during the war years was a pur chased friendship We needed it we bought it we got it But with the close of the war it was obvious that the whole mat ter was going to have to be put on a new basis Our first thinking on the subject came into view at Mexico City in what came to be known as the Act of Chapultepec DURING the war Argentina had cuddled up to Hitler Germany Evidences of this were numerous and pronounced As soon as we could we began taking note of this in our western hemispheric diplomacy We started cracking down on her Our premise was that Argentinas government was fascist and should be treated as such But this plan of action didnt work out too well And the reason It didnt work well is that Argen tina isnt the only country In South America with fascistic ten dencies The truth is that in all of South America there isnt a nation which can be accurately described as a democracy Theyre republics yes not democracies And a footnote to this would be that there not only isnt a true democracy in South America but there isnt going to be cant be long as only 1 out of 5 persons can read and write In such a situation its Inevitable that the government will have fascist and dictatorial character istics WELL in the period between the Mexico City conference 2 years ago and the meeting at Rio CONTINUED ON PAGE 2 NO AID UNLESS CONCRESS CALL U S TAKES OFF WRAP ON MOVE TO STOP REDS Bluntly Tells Russia Greece Doctrine Aimed at Halting Communism By R H SHACKFORD DP Staff Correspondent Lake Success N Y United States Monday protested persistent and gross soviet cal umnies leveled at the Truman doctrine in Greece and said that the U S objective was to prevent imposition of a communist eco nomic system in that country I can understand V S Dele gate Herschel V Johnson told the UNs political and security com mittee in the debate on Greece why the USSR representing an other economic system is dis turbed by our action in Greece But I ask why the Greek peo ple should suffer because the Soviet Union cannot impose its system on that country Johnson said the major U S motive in Greece was develop ment of an economic policy which we consider sound Johnsons statement was the first time that a U S official has so bluntly stated that the U S objective in Greece is to combat communist ideology since Presi dent Truman announced his doc trine to congress Johnson joined British Delegate Hector McNeil in denouncing the representatives of Russia Poland Yugoslavia and the 2 soviet social ist republics of trying deliberately to sidetrack the UN with irrel evant accusations in the political and security committee Polish Delegate Oscar Lange jumpedto his Jeet immediately to remind Johnson and McNeil that he has not yet spoken on the Greek question and therefore could not be guilty of their accusations The first break in the western front was submitted by French delegate Yvon Delbos who chal lenged the U S and British charges that Yugoslavia Albania and Bulgaria were guilty of ag gression against Greece He said there was no evidence to support such charges but admitted they had done nothing to prevent guer illas from crossing the border McNeil countered with the dec laration that beyond doubt Greece had been threatened from outside her borders and that ac tive assistance had been given Greek guerillas by her 3 northern neighbors Greek Foreign Minister Constan tin Tsaldaris opened Mondays de bate by denouncing Soviet critic ism of the Truman doctrine as tendentious and warning that the Ui Ss aid pro gram would fail if attacks on Greece are not stopped Johnson and McNeil made a special effort to congratulate Tsal daris and to criticize speakers for the Soviet side Answering Soviet Delegate An drei A Gromykos bitter attack on the Greek government for alleg edly trying to promote a war be tween east and west Tsaldaris told the UNs political and security committee that sincethis assembly started the northern neighbors of Greece have increased their aid to guerillas who are fighting the Greek government Meanwhile former Hungarian Premier Ferenc Nagy and 3 other Balkan opposition leaders who have fled their countries lobbied in the UN corridors for a sponsor of their sensational proposal which would lay the entire eastern Euro pean problem before this assem bly They expected to get a Lathi American nation to make the for mal request for inclusion of their problem on the agenda Grain Prices Soar Despite Margin Curbs Chicago grains soared for limit advances on the board of trade Monday as heavy buying swept into the pits More than an hour before the close all wheat contracts for fu ture delivery were up 10 cents all corn contracts up 8 cents all oats up 6 cents and all soybeans con tracts up 8 cents In each case these were the limits permitted in a single session With buying orders in the pits and nothing offered for sale De cember wheat was bid at December corn December oats and November soy beans The upturn came despite the fact that directors prior to the opening announced a sliding scale of margins The new scale ad vances margin requirements 5 cents for every 10 cents a bushel advance in price Chief cause of the buying move ment was a recommendation to President Truman by a group of industrial and agricultural advis ers that the United States attempt to export 570000000 bushels of all grains including 500000000 bush els of wheat and flour Brokers pointed out this was in excess of recommendations of the cabinetfood committee last week which said 400000000 bushels of wheat and flour was about the maximum this country could spare Grain men said the new recom mendation if carried out would leave a very small carryover into the new crop year on July 1 1948 Directors voted to increase margins on grains 5 cents bushel when any one future of any one grain advances 10 cents HEAT PUT ON IOWA GAMBLING Find Slot Machines Out in Several Cities Des Moines advice of Attorney General Robert L Lar son to enforce antigambling laws in Iowa appears to be producing results Since Larson several weeks ago sentjout a general letter to county attorneys notifying them that the law banning gambling devices must be enforced action has been taken in several places to ban or greatly restrict use of slot ma chines and other gambling devices Floyd county officers and state agents raided 3 clubs in Charles City Friday night and seized 18 slot machines and 270000 gamb ling tickets Slot machines are out at Bur lington Davenport Iowa City and Marshalltown and reports indi cate that the machines have been withdrawn from Dubuque The campaign also has reached into smaller towns Ute residents have paid fines in slot machine cases and gambling fines also have been paidin Harrison county Bishops of the Catholic church have banned slot machines from Knights of Columbus club rooms In Des Moines Polk County At torney Carroll O Switzer after a conference with Police Chief Lor in Miller said commercial gamb ling would not be tolerated in Des Moines SAME 389 CWhite Hit means no traffic deitlt la put 24 boan 76 Albanians Sentenced for Spying for United States Belgrade Yugoslavia Albanians who were con victed of spying for the United States awaited hanging or shooting in a Tirana Albania prison Monday Four other defendants were sentenced to life imprisonment 3 were sentenced to 20 years and one to 15 years Nine of the defend ants were members of the opposition in the Albania assembly to Col Gen Enver Hoxhas government Three of the condemned men were ordered hanged The other 13 will be shot The court that tried them did not set a date for their executions Thentrial began early this month and the prosecution charged that all were in the pay of an American mission which left last year and that they also had worked for the British The defendants the prosecution charged were involved in a plot by which the AngloAmericans Intended to overthrow the peo ples authority in Albania as they had realized U did not serve their imperialistic designs Bequir Tchela one of the de fendants testified he had been trained by American intelligence for espionage and sabotage He said he had reported to American agents for more than 14 years and in the last few menthsat tended meetings in the American legation where he was instructed to supply the United States with political economic and military information AP Wlrcphoto CONGRESSIONAL LEADERS TO FOOD at the White House Monday morning for a conference with President Truman on hunger abroad and high prices in the U S are left to fight Rep Leslie C Arends house republican whip Sen ator H Styles Bridges RN Senator Wallace H White republican floor leader Rep Charles Halleck republican floor leader Rep Sam Rayburn D minority leader Rep Charles Eaton RN chairman of the foreign affairs committee and Rep Sol Bloom DN member of the foreign affairs committee U S May Put NoPropaganda Pledge on Red Press at UN Officials Discuss Curb Already ParonWritef for French Newspaper By EDWARD BOMAR A P Staff Correspondent Washington state and justice departments may slap sharp restrictions on the activities of all foreign correspondents ad mitted to this country toreport sessions of the United Nations as sembly for communist publica tions it was learned Monday Officials said a new official pol icy under discussion would apply generally the curbs imposed on Pierre Courtade a writer for the Faris Communist Daily 1Hu manite Courtade arrived in New York last week Before he was granted a passport visa to come to the United States lie was required to pledge that he would 1 Enter and leave by an Atlan tic port 2 Remain in New York City and the Long Island meeting places of the United Nations 3 Depart when the assembly session is completed 4 Engage in no subversive or propaganda activities nor agitate against the United States during his stay Prior to Courtades arrival sev eral other foreign correspondents for the communist press had been permitted to come to the United States temporarily to report on U N developments without such re strictions Most were from coun tries in the Soviet orbit The pending proposal is to re quire that these visitors give the same pledges as Courtade Officials noted there are corres pondents at U N headquarters from coinmunuistdominated Yu goslavia and Poland from a Greek communuist paper and from Sov iet Russia itself They said they did not know how many The Soviet citizens in this coun try all have diplomatic or official status and would not be affected Congress in a resolution passed on Jan 10 1944 called for a worldwide right of interchange of news gathered by agencies or in dividuals by any means and without discrimination The state department itself is preparing to negotiate for bilat eral agreements which would per mit free movement of correspon dents between the United States and any countries ratifying the treaties The state department official explained however American im migration laws dating from 1918 bar from the United States certain class of individuals deemed to be dangertus and the attorney gen eral has ruled these include com munist party members and those who carry on communist propa ganda Courtade thus would be entirely inadmissable but for the state of the N as an international or ganization on American soil Congress however approved last Aug 4 a U N headquarters site agreement providing that non official foreigners otherwise barred might be admitted temporarily at the request of the United Nations specifically on U N business such as testifying at a hearing Courtade can write freely about the United Nations and his dis patches are not subject to censor ship Should he leave the New York area or otherwise violate his pledge he would be subject to de portation proceedings by the im migration and naturalization serv ice on a charge of violating the conditions of his transit visas Boost Haircuts to in Mason City The family overhead is going up again Warning of another jump in the cost of living was given Monday in a joint announcement by the Journeymen Barbers and Master Barbers organization in Mason City that the price of hair cuts will be increased from 75 cents to beginning Oct 1 The new price will be in effect in all Mason City shops according to the announcement U S SHIP HITS MINE AT TRIESTE 3 Men Are Killed 12 Hurt in Sea Explosion Trieste ff Three men died Monday when the U S destroyer Douglas H Fox hit a mine off Trieste The explosion knocked out hot of the destroyers propellers and both rudders Four other men were injurec critically and 8 more required hos pital treatment One man died on the Fox al most immediately Two others succumbed aboard the destroyer J C Owen which took aboard the Fox casualties all enlisted men The Owen arrived here Monday night about 6 hours after the ex plosion The Fox had about 200 men aboard naval headquarters here said She hit the mine 18 miles of Trieste as she was moving toward this free territory from Venice Tugs were assigned to tow it to a Venice drydock Weather Report FORECAST Mason City Clearing and much colder Monday night with kill ing frost Tuesday partly cloudy and somewhat warmer Low Monday night 2530 high Tues day near 50 Iowa Clearing and much colder Monday night with frost Tues day partly cloudy and some what warmer Wednesday in creasing cloudiness and warmr er Occasional light rain west portion spreading to east Ipor tion Thursday Temperatures Tuesday will range from aver age lows of 25 to 30 northeast and 32 to 35 south and west Average highs wjll range from 50 northeast to 60 south and west On Wednesday from lows of 40 north to 48 south and west and high from 62 north to 66 south and west Minnesota Fair Monday night with freezing temperatures and killing frosts Tuesday increas ing cloudiness and warmer fol lowed by light rain extreme west IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics for 24 hour period ending at 8 oclock Monday morning Maximum 79 Minimum 45 At 8 a m Monday 45 Precipitation Trace YEAR AGO Maximum 65 Minimum 32 GlobeGazette weather statistics for 24 hour period ending at 8 oclock Sunday morning Maximum 57 Minimum 49 At 8 a m Sunday 57 YEAR AGO Maximum 74 Minimum 42 Iowa Weather Chills After Balmy Sunday Des Moines weath er did another quick change ac Monday After a balmy Sunday which saw the mercury rise to 81 at Os kaloosa Sunday and sag to a rela tively mild state low of 43Sunday night cooler weather was prevail ing in northwestIowa Monday A mass of cold air sweeping in from the northwest sent thetem perature down from 52 in Mason City at a mto 45 at8 a m The weather bureau said the cold snap would move slowly east ward Temperatures below freez ing occurred in North Dakota ear ly Monday and Jamestown re corded a low of 28 Light rains occurred in eastern Iowa Sunday Heaviest fall re ported by the weather bureau wa 19 of an inch at Iowa Falls Du buque had a tenth of an inch and Davenport a twentieth of an inch 10 Are Killed oy Explosion in Palestine Jerusalem Jewish un derground blew up the 5story laifa police headquarters build ng Monday killing 10 Britons and Arabs and wounding 54 persons in he worst blast to wrack Palestine ince the King David hotel bomb ng 14 months ago The underground organizations rgun Zvai Lcuni and Stern or ganization assumed full responsi ility for the bombing In circu ars distributed in Palestine they said it was in reprisal for the de portation Of Jewish refugees iboard the immigrant ships Des spite which was intercepted Sat urday and the Exodus 1947 seized ast summer Dead in the greatest blast of battlescarred Haifas history were British police 4 Arab police 2 Arab civilians one of them a 16 year old boy and an unidentified jerson who was blown to bits The dynamiters drove a truck up to the security fence around he police headquarters building on Kings Way A makeshift crane of 12foot iron bars hefted the barrel containing the explosives rom the truck over the fence Re eased the barrel rolled against he building where it exploded a little later The blast wrecked the building sent fragments of shattered glass flying for hundreds of yards and shook the whole city of Haifa Shops along Kings Way were wrecked and plundering cost the shopkeepers more than according tothe early estimates A United Press correspondent reported from Haifa I visited the government hos pital and saw the bodies lying in the mortuary The bodies mutilated Some of them were without legs and others had var ious parts missing I saw 13 constables who were injured and spoke to civilians nYany of whom were wounded seriously A remarkable thing was the number fatally injured by broken window panes which flew through the air over a radius of 100 yards The dead were killed either by flying glass splinters or by con cussion One Arab constable was killed 100 yards from the building His neck was cut by a flying window pane The blast at a little after 6 a m shattered the peace of the Jewish Sukoth of weeklong feast of the tabernacles Informed sources said the Sternists sought retaliation for the deportation of the Despite refugees and might have hoped to implicate the rival Jewish under ground organization Hagana o which Haifa is a major stronghold Army and police officials de cided not to impose a curfew on Haifa SENATOR SAYS TRUMAN SEES NO OTHER WAY Lucas Tells Presidents Views After Talk With Cbngressional Leaders Scott Lucas DI11 reported Monday that President Truman told con gressional leaders there is no way to give emergency aid to Europe without a special session of con gress this fall Lucas made that statement fo reporters as he left a white house conference on the problem Of aid to Europe The senator was asked whether that was the mutual opinion of the white house gathering The president told us that Lucas replied Representative Halleck R majority leader of the house replied Oh no when re porters asked whether there had been a meeting of minds He said there had1 been an exchange iews Senator Vandenberg presidingofficer of the senate de clined to discuss the high policy conference which lasted 2 and one halfhours We are going to let the presi dent tell about it Vandenberg said Earlier while the conference was going on Presidential Secre tary Charles G Ross had advised newsmen that there would be a white house statement later on the results of the meeting Attending the conference were 11 congress members Secretary of State Marshall Secretary of Agri culture Anderson Secretary of Commerce Harriman and 2 presi dential aides John R Steelman and Clark Clifford Marshall Anderson and Harri man compose the cabinet food committee which reported to Mr Truman last week that American grain exports must be cut and that the situation requires saving of food in the United States if needs of Europe are to be met Sports Bulletin BULLETIN St Louis Ed die Dyer Monday signed a one year contract to manage the St Louis Cardinals in 1948 BULLETIN New York Cronin manager of the Boston Red Sox announced Monday that Joe McCarthy former boss of the New York Yankees had signed a 2year contract to direct the Boston club with Cronin be coming the general manager Ionia Voters Favor Waterworks System at a special elec tion here favored a new water works system by a vote of 127 to 9 Work on the project will prob ably not get underway before next spring U S Demands Russ Disavow Press Article Washington United States has demanded that Russia disavow a soviet writers article comparing President Truman with Adolf Hitler and Moscow has flat ly rejected the American protest This was disclosed Monday by the state department It said the United States called the article in sulting Foreign Minister Molotov turned dowri the American protest in a bitterly worded note that flayed the American press for its crit icism of the Soviet Union Lieut Gen Walter B Smith American ambasador to Moscow presented a stiffly worded protest Thursday article by Boris Gorbatov in the Literary Gazette No 39 Smith advised the Russian gov ernment the article was iibelous on the president of the United States and added I must assure you in the most solemn terms that every fair minded American citizen regard less of his political opinion will be deeply affronted by this article and will feel that he in some way shares the personal insult thus gratuitously offered to President Truman In the official Russian reply Molotov said the Russian govern ment cannot bear the responsibil ity for this or that article and so much the more cannot accept the protest you have made in that connection GIs Report Yugoslav Captors Boasted of Russian Strength Trieste Yugoslavs who captured 3 American soldiers last Monday and held them 5 days tried hard to impress upon their prisoners how strong Russia is The Lt William T Van Atteu of East Orange N J Pfc Earl G Hendrick of Arlington Va and pfc Glen A Myers of Edgeley N back to full duty Monday guard ing the new TriesteYugoslav border They said the Yugoslavs treated us kid gloves They were released Saturday after tion of the state department Sun day night they told their stories to correspondents and reenacted their capture for the newsreels The main thing the interroga tors wanted to know from me and the enlisted men was how much strength the Americans have in the Trieste area Van Atten said He said they gave only the infor mation prescribed for prisoners Name rank and serial number Van Atten got the impression that the Yugoslavs think Presi dent Truman is responsible for creation of the Trieste free state which they dont like I told them they were our al lies he said They agreed but said they had their orders They kept talking about how strong Russia was When I asked them why it was taking so long for our release they stalled and said that they had to get certain documents and that we had to be taken to a certain major We never saw this major Authorities estimate that Michi gan farmers lose annually from fires caused by spontaneous combustion of hay LOOK INS IDE See Pacific Northwest Ripe for GOP Darkhorse See page 2 Ackley Canning Plant Closes Corn Pack Cut See page 10 Shea to Hurl Series Opener for Yankees Sec page 11 1000 See Rod and Gun Club Field Day Events See page 13   

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