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Mason City Globe Gazette: Wednesday, September 10, 1947 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - September 10, 1947, Mason City, Iowa                                NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME AMI Bit Mlfttt THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHIOftS HOME EDITION TTTTTT1 VOL AMOdittd Pro and United Ptttt Full Lcued Wlrn Cmti a Copy MASON CITY IOWA WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 10 1947 Thli Paper Coculita of Two Oni No MS U S WHOLESALE FOOD PRICES SOAR MARSHALL FOR SOME KIND OF AID THIS YEAR Secretary of State Hints Strong Need of Special Congress Call By JOHN X H1GHTOWER AP Staff Correspondent Washington of State said Wednesday that Europe must have some kind of temporary aid this yifar and only congress can authorize it This was a strong intimation that he believes a special session of will be necessary But Marshall declined at a news con ference to say flatly sucb a session should be called The secretary did say the state department would have at hand by late October adequate facts on which to chart a course of action His statement came on the heels of an urgent new plea from Lon don that the United Statesassume a large share of Britains occupa tion ccsts in Germany There were reports this country is making preparations to do so Marshall when saying the state department will have needed data at hand by late October com mented that the majority of con gressional commitees visiting Eu rope will have reurned by that time He declined to estimate now much aid may be required pre liminary to the long range plan Marshall has projected for Euro Jeconsniction Tfifcsecretary of state said he Julias nft made up his mind on any detailslpf the problem He classed the cjtifetion of a special session also detail At the same time Marshall said he does not think it is possible to get authority for aid without special The total of Marshalls com ments appeareii to those athis news conference to add to this Marshall believes there will have to be a special session in late Oc tober or early November to pro vide a temporary aid fund as a sort of advance on the Marshall longrange assistance program But he is not yet ing final word from President Tru make his decision known He said the president is being kept informed of all the facts in the situation In a formal statement which he volunteered at the outset of his conference Marshall saidthe im mediatephase of Europes re quirement will ctearly Have to be given our urgent consideration and cannot await the completion of the broader study which the over all program demands The state and war departments disclosed Tuesday night that the British embassy bad sent word that Britain will run but of dol lars to cover its expenditures in Germany about the end ofthis year From that time on the em bassy said the British govern ment will be unable to make any more dollars available for main taining the civilian population in the British occupation zone An AngloAmerican conference to consider this latest dilemma was asked and arranged for early next month LOOK Will Show Good Market Hog Type at Austin Show See page 3 Mason City Paving to Start Next Week See page 15 Roster Announced for Mohawk Grid Team See page 13 State Condemning Half Mile of Lake Shore See page 9 SwaletoHeadYMCA Drive for 700 Members See page 15 W 360 SAME fU menu no duth In Vut 21 toon InterDAtional Sonndphoto NEW V F W H Brannaman left of Denver Colo was elected CommanderinChief of the Veterans of Foreign Wars and Mrs Dorothy Mann of Detroit Mich was named president of the Womens Auxiliary as the V F W wound up their 48th National Encampment at Cleveland Ohio Cleveland Ohio M Brannaman 55 of Denver who was born and reared in Iowa is the new national commanderin chief of the Veterans of Foreign Wars Brannaman a World War I veteran was elected without op position at the close of the or ganizations Tuesday annual encampment Lyall TBeggs Madison Wis was named senior vice com mander The encampment asked direct government action to enjoin the existence the communist party of the United States Brannaman was born at Lis bon Iowa was graduated from high school at Cedar Rapids at tended Coe college and was ath letic director at the Anamosa re formatory prior to World War I He iow is executive director of the Colorado Good Koads asso ciation The V F W rehabilitates committee endorsed use of Schick hospital at Clinton by the veter ans administration Tom Nelson Dubuque was elected permanent chairman of the V F W Mississippi Valley conference 40000000 Bushel Slump in Iowa Corn Since MidAugust Estimate 32783000 Bushel Drop in U S Crop for This Year By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS The government Wednesday es timated Iowas 1947 corn crop at 347340000 bushels as of Sept 1 or nearly 40000000 bushels under the midAugust forecast Yield per acre was estimated at 35 bushels compared to 39 bushels Aug 15 The agriculture department Wednesday also estimated the na tions corn crop at 2403913000 bushels and the recordbreaking wheat crop at 1408602000 bush els The national corn estimate com pares with 2436696000 bushels forecast as of midAugust 3287 927000 last year and 2639102000 for the 10year 193645 aver age The latest forecast puts Iowa in 2nd place behind Illinois among Americas chief cornproducing states The Illinois estimate is for a 39 bushels yield and a 351936 000bushel production The new Iowa yield figures rep resent a 7 bushels per acre de cline from August 1 and total in dicated production is 48 per cent under last years record breaking crop of 661620000 bushels It will be Iowas smallest corn crop since toe 190434000 bushel production in the drought year of 1936 The indicated Iowa production on AugUft busheta aadr as of reflects continued drouth QHiidjifciuB throughout the last hstt of August 1547 Iowa soybean crop was estimated at 17 bushels an acre with the total harvest for beans at 30715000 bushels The August 1 estimate had placed the soybean production at 32526000 uushels Iowas oats production was es timated at 33 bushels an acre for total 1947 yield of 187638000 aushels The national corn estimate com pares with the governments pro duction of 3000000000 and with 850000000 bushels estimated to je needed to maintain a high level of livestock and meat production next year The U S wheat estimate com pares wtih 1427747000 bushels 15 was 387036000 ssharp reduction forecast a month ago with 1155 715000 last previous 890306000 for the 10 year average i Winter wheat was indicated at 1095648000 bushels compared with 1095648000 predicted a month ago 873893000 last year and 653893000 for the 10 year average REJECT FREIGHT RATE HIKE NOW ICC Rules Shippers Must Be Heard First Washington Interstate Commerce Commission Wednes day rtiled against ah immediate freight rate Jncrease for the rail roads by announcing thatshippers opposed to the raise will be heard before action will be taken The railroads are asking a 27 per cent boost in rates with a 10 per cent increase to take effect at once as an emergency measure prior to formal hearings However ICC Chairman Clyde Atchesori told attorneys for the railroads at an afternoon session on the case that opposition wit nesses will be heard before the commissioon acts on the proposed emergency increase Iowa Cityan Elected Head of Iowa Police Burlington Dole zal Iowa City was elected presi dent of the Iowa Policemans as sociation and Mrs Robert Lazon by Clinton president of the aux iliary in closing sessions Wednes day of the annual convention here Other association officers are Glenn Walters Cedar Rapids first vice president Lester Donaldson Ames 2nd vice president Harold Bernson Waterloo 3rd vice pres ident John Davis Dubuque and Boyd Raybrun Des Moines direc tors George Kean Sioux City was reelected secretarytreasur er Leo Allstot Mason City is the associations retiring president and Mrs Lazonby succeeds Mrs C R Hooper jNewton as auxiliary president AH BODY HINTS Whistles Way fo Recovery IrVIr I 11111 IV Esthervllle vpar affn Tlavirt Woo nnw 4 voare nlrt 3RD ROUND OF WAGE DEMANDS 15 Top Officers Say Pay Hikes Inadequate to Meet Price Boosts Chicago AFL executive council hinted Wednesday that a 3rd round of postwar wage de mands could be expected if the cost of living continues to mount Wage boosts were granted to most major unions in the first year after VJ day Generally they amounted to about 181 cents an hour A 2nd increase ranging from 11 to 15 cents hourly was passed on to most big unions this spring and summer The 15 top AFL officers said the wage hikes were inadequate to keep pace with prices Inflation has now assumed alarming proportions the council said The purchasing power of the wagsearners dollar has been cut in half since the war Food prices are now bursting through the roof Economists are predict ing a dollar a dozen eggs and a dollar a pound butter Meat is go ing to be more scarce and more expensive Substitute foods be cause of demand will also shodt upward Unless the cost of living is promptly reduced and stabilized pressure for higher wages is cer tain to mount AFL President William Green said restoration of the OPA was out of the question as was a spe cial session of congress to clamp new controls on some commod ities as proposed by a CIO com mittee The council advocated instead 1 Immediate revision of our foreign commitments lim iting help uflaertneMarsifai plan to those nations willing to coop erate with us for the preservation of world peace 2 Encouragement of increased industrial and agricultural pro duction 3 Expansion of transportation facilities to move the increased production The railroad car shortage is the chief obstacle to transportation Green said and railroads should be enabled to acquire new rolling stock Green said the council in ses sion here this week would again tackle the longsmouldering jur isdictional dispute of AFLunions at Hollywood movie studios Wed nesday V A meeting of the union chiefs involved and Rep Carroll D Kearns investigating labor conditions in the movie cap ital was held here last Sunday Another session will be held with Kearns in Hollywood Oct 20 aft er the AFL convention in San Francisco U S Against Sending Jews Into Germany Washington of State Marshall disclosed Wednes day that the United States futile ly urged the British government to reconsider its decision to send the 4400 Exodus Jews back to Germany In a news conference comment Marshall revealed strong American disapproval of the British action Three shiploads the Jews seeking to enter Palestine on the Exodus 1947 were turned back and their disembarkation at Ham burg was completed Tuesday Marshall said American officials had been keenly aware of the un fortunate results which would fol low from the British decision to unload the Jews at Hamburg The British had to use force to remove some of them Their final disposition is still unsettled and some are reported on a hunger strike Marshall said the American government urged the British to reconsider their decision The British replied he said that the only available housing was in Germany However Marshall added that a French offer of admittance was still open and that the Jewish ref ugees therefore need not necessar ily remain long in Germany Recover Body of lowan Chicago Coastguardsmen have recovered from the Calumet river a body identified from pa pers as that of Theodore James Hairless 45 of Logan Iowa Harrless was a coal passer who worked on the Steamship J E Upson He was employed by the Wilson Transit company of Cleve land Estherville year ago David Wee now 4 years old was stricken with bulbar poliomyelitis His facial muscles and the left side of his body were paralyzed David began to make slow progress toward recovery The doctor told David and Davids parents Mr and Mrs Oden Wee that wkoi la oosld purse his lips and whistle he would be completely welt Davids facial muscles were the last to respond and he began chewing gum to exercise them There is joy in the Wee home now 1 David has whistled FRED C ESLICK Fred C Eslick 65 Dies Following Short Illness Rites for Mason City Business Man toBe Saturday Afternoon Fred C Eslick 65 for 38 years active in the business life of Ma son City died Wednesday at a m at Ms residence 325 Penn sylvania S E following a short illness He was for many yews presi dent and manager of the Cadwell Transfer Storage company and during World war n was district manager of ODT in this territory Mr Eslick was born Frederick Charles Eslick March 10 1882 at Lehigh Iowa the son of Frank and Mary Baker Eslick He was marriedto Anne Boyle at Lehigh Dec 3 1901 They moved to Ben ton Harbor Mich later return ing to Lehigh where he was as sociated with a brick and tile company In 1909 the family moved to Mason City from Clarion where Mr Eslicfc had started as dis patcher for the Chicago Great Western railroad and he became the first general agent for the same road in Mason City He took an active interest in the Mason City community and in 1916 bought and became man ager and president of the Cadwell Transfer and Storage company which he operated until 1939 Appointed secretary of the NRA trucking industry for Iowa Mr prominent order out of chaos and instituting many reforms in the Iowa truck ing industry In 1925 Mr Eslick took the lead ing role in the establishment of the traffic department of the Ma son City Chamber of Commerce At the time of his death he was operating the Fred Eslick Book keeping Service He was a member of he First Methodist church at Lehigh and the Elks club of Mason City Surviving are his wife Z sons Clifford Eslick Mason City and Clarence H Eslick Marshalltown and a daughter Mrs B C Fisher Mason City and 6 grandchildren Fred Eslick Mason City Don ald Denny Faie and David Es lick Marshalltown and Barbara Anne Fisher Mason City He was preceded in death by his parents and a brother Jack of Clarion who died in 1908 Funeral services will be held at the chapel of the McAuley and Son funeral home Saturday at 3 p m with Doctor Lloyd A Gus tafson pastor of the First Meth odist church officiating Burial will be at Memorial Park ceme tery The McAuley and Son fu neral home in charge KOSSUTH BOND ISSUE CARRIES New Courthouse Given Approval 1639 to 856 bond issue for constructing and equip ping a courthouse was ap proved by Kossutn county voters by a margin of 1639 to 856 a tab ulation of Tuesdays special elec tion showed Wednesday The same proposition failed to carry at an election several years ago when times were hard In a preelection statement the Kossuth county board of supervis ors said that even if the issue car ried it would proceed cautiously and that construction might not begin for from 3 to 5 years State fire inspectors repeated ly have told county officials that the present courthouse is unsafe In addition it is too small and the county is renting outside office space for 3 units of county gov ernment AP Wlrephoto OF GOOD Mattalina and his wife Elizabeth get good news via phone that he was named to receive in the will of his late employer Chicago was an overflow crowd of customers at Mattalinas tiny delicatessen store Tuesday night but instead of mak ing purchases they joined James Mattalina in celebrating his good fortune of receiving an estimated from his employer Earlier the win of Miss Anna Craig 82 for whom Mattalina was chauffeur for 25 years was filed for probate It left the greater part of her estate valued at more than to the 53 year old Matta lina for his kind consideration to me at ail times Miss Craig died Sept 3 Joining in the celebration in the small store and 2room flat were Mattalinas wife Elizabeth their son Sam 30 and a daughter Mrs Geraldine Bruell 28 Mrs Matta Una operated the store Therell be a spotted pony for my grandson Mattalina said and a new house This place goes for sure Im going to give away every single thing in this free But then he changed his mind adding Something might go wrong and I wouldnt get the money Mother and 2 Sons Found Dead in Silo No inquest was planned Wednesday in the deaths of Mrs Estel Andrews and her sons Donald 14 and Roger 10 who were found dead late Tues day in a silo on their farm north of here The bodies were in the silo which had been filled with corn fodder Saturday and Humboldt County Coroner Dr C Newman of Bode said their deaths were due to asphyxiation caused by gas gener ated from the heated fodder The accident it believed to have happened about p m Tues day when Roger and a playmate Ted Bastian 9 went to the silo to play Roger climbed to the top and entered the silo while young Bas tian remained on the ground Hearing cries for help the play mate called Donald who at tempted to rescue his brother When Donald and Roger failed to appear Bastian called Mrs An drews She entered the silo and due to the shrinkage of the fresh fodder was unable to climb out By the time 4 neighboring fanners and a Humboldt physician arrived all 3 were dead Coroner Newman said The father was away from home at the time of the tragedy He was helping fill a silo at a neigh boring farm Besides the father 2 daughters Mary Sue 16 and Linda Kay 2 survive Charles City Is Hit Hard by Windstorm While the rest of Iowa had scat tered thundershowers on the weather Wednesday Charles City andvicinity was busy clean ing up following a ram of 40 and windstorm of near tornadic pro portions waich struck Tuesday evening Three large plate glass windows were blown out of the Woolworth store front and telephone and power service was disrupted for some time at Charles City Two farge sheet iron ventilators on 2 buildings were blown off There were no reports of any one injured A shift reporting for work at the Oliver corporation plant at p m was sent home because of a power shutoff One residential ga rage was lifted from its founda tions Fiftyseven year old weather bureau records at Charles Ciiy shojved that Tuesday nights 44 mile an hour wind was exceeded in velocity only by a 47 mile per hour wind Sept 16 1916 hot weather caused numerous school closings in the state Tuesday In Des Moines Tuesday the mercury went to 100 the alltime high for Sept 9 The weather bu reau said the state high was 101 at Oskaloosa The Iowa low early Tuesday was 67 at Spencer Warm and humid weather over spread much of the eastern half of the nation Wednesday although scattered thundershowers brought a measure of coolness to some lo calities The downpour was so heavy in Hibbing Minn Tuesday that storm sewers backed up flooding dwellings and marooning motor ists in their automobiles Railroad ore trains were stopped by track washouts The 6hour rain was accompanied by violent lightning Weather Report FORECAST Iowa Partly cloudy Wednesday night thundershowers north west half Thursday mostly cloudy with scattered thunder showers and becoming cooler north and west portions Low Wednesday night 6874 High Thursday 8595 Mason City Mostly cloudy with thundershowers probable Wed nesday night and Thursday Cooler Thursday Low Wednes day night near 68 High Thurs day near 85 Minnesota Mostly cloudy with scattered showers and thunder storms Wednesday night Thurs day clearing and cooler except little change Red River valley and along Canadian border IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics for 24 hour period ending at 8 oclock Wednesday morning Maximum 92 Minimum 68 At 8 a m Wednesday 75 YEAR AGO Maximum 80 Minimum 53 CHICAGO GRAIN MARKET JUMPS TO NEW Commerce Department Says Personal Incomes Have Hit New Record By ALFRED LEECH U P Staff Correspondent Chicago UF9 Wholesale food prices throughout the nation and grain prices on the Chicago board of trade soared to new alltime highs Wednesday and the U S department commerce reported that personal incomes also had climbed to a new record Dun and Bradstreet Inc re ported at New York that the index of wholesale food prices rose 31 cents in the past week to a new alltime high Twenty of the 31 basic food products used ia com piling the figure showed sharp increases The only price dips were in peas raisins and rice On the Chicago board of trade September Tvheat corn and oats topped previous price records and December May and July wheat shot up the full IQceht lim it permitted in any days trading September lard futures and soy beans also hit the limit December wheat soli for a bushel Septemberwheat reached September corn 263i and September oats Milling and bakery spokesmen forecast an increase in the price of a loaf of bread it wheat con tinues its climb At the Chicago stockyards strictly choice steers brought a hundredweight topping the 1947 peak of reached in January and equaled last week At Sioux City Iowa choice hogs sold for a hundredweight a new alltime high for the leading corn belt markets Some of the other principal yards were getting for the first time in history At Omaha hogs hit an alltime high for the yards of and at most yards they were up 50 cents to a hundredweight At Chicago they were per hundred pounds The commerce department an nounced that personal income reached an unprecedented annual rate of during July This was almost 000 higher than the June rate which was the previous peak The department said the income rise was brought about by higher farm income increased wage and salary receipts and a larger num ber of World war II veterans re ceivingstate bonuses The annual personal income rate for July compared with actual personal income payments in 1946 Personal income means money paid out in wages and salaries dividends and interest the net income of pro prietorships and partnerships the rent receipts of landlords and similar types of income Meanwhile there were these other price developments 1 Sen Scott Lucas warned that a return to some sort of price control might be neces sary to halt skyrocketing prices Z The American Federation of Labor executive board meeting in its regular quarterly session here hinted that the union would ask for pay increases unless the cost of living was reduced and stabil ized 3 An official of the CIO United Farm Equipment Workers union said it was high time the country had an allout investigation as to who pockets the difference be tween what the farmer gets for his produce and the fabulous price the city workers have to pay for it 4 Bouse democratic whip John W McCormack asked a congres sional committee to conduct an investigation to determine wheth er recent price increases in oil and gasoline were justified or the re sult of monopolistic practices Officials of the National Fed eration of Millers said that the price of flour has been rising in pace with the price that millers pay for wheat Spokesmen for the baking in dustry in turn said it was only a matter of time before bakers would be farced to raise the price of bread In states where it is per missible they said bakers might take the alternative of lessening the weight of the loaf Snow t Onray Colo ff W i n t e r reached this southwestern Color ado mountain town Wednesday In the higher reaches the sea sons first sustained snow fell and motorists reported an inch of snow on Red Mountain Pass between Ouray and Silverton In the lower altitudes the snow turned into a driving rain   

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