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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: May 29, 1947 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - May 29, 1947, Mason City, Iowa                                NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME Paper Consist Two MASON CITY IOWA THURSDAY MAY 29 1947 VOt un Pm ruii wire oriv VOTE VOLUNTARY 15 RENT BOOST CONFEREES SET JULY IFOR DATE OF TAX SLASH House Senate Group Agrees to Final Terms of Billion Cut Washington If Senate and house conferees agreed Thursday on final terms of a a year income tax cut to take ef fect July 1 The measure provides for In dividual slashes ringing from 105 per cent to 30 per cent The senate bill was accepted by the conferees except for one change in rate reduction brackets The area of 15 per cent cuts was made effective from of taxable income to The senate had provided for a 15 per cent reduction between and Senator Millikin head of the senate conferees said both houses would expedite final action on the legislation It is expected to come up in the house Monday and possibly later the same day in the senate The big question remaining is whether President Truman will sign or veto the tax cuts He has Iowas Vote Washington Senators Hickenlooper and Wilson Iowa republicans voted with the ma jority Wednesday when the sen atepassed 52 to 34 a bill to re duce income taxes Both voted against a substitute by Senator Lucas when it was de feated 58 to 28 Lucas argued his plan would give a fair per centage of the total tax reduc tion to those in the lower in come brackets the present isvnot a suitable time for reducing gov ernment revenue Millikin estimated the change m the 15 per cent reduction bracket will add to the cost of the bill in terms of last federal revenue Even the most enthusiastic re publican advocates of an immedi ate tax reduction admitted that Wednesdays 5234 vote offered no hope that a veto could be over ridden in the senate A twothirds majority is necessary to override The bill provides for the follow ing cuts in present taxes over a full year 30 per cent off for persons whose incomes after exemptions and de ductions are a year or less 30 to 20 per cent on net Incomes between 51000 and approximately 20 per cent between and Consumers Assured of 35 Lbs Sugar Washington agricul ture department announced Thursday it has allotted civilians enough sugar to assure each con sumer a ration of 35 and maybe year The ration last year was 25 pounds The department said that if re cent improvements in the supply continue a moderate increase about 35 pounds may be author ized later The allocation for 1970000 shore tons civilians is raw value for the JulySeptember quarter This is about 350000 tons more than were allocated for the cor responding quarter last year Ration stamps good for 25 pounds already have been vali dated while a 3rd stamp good for an additional 10 pounds will be issued not later than Aug 1 the department said Rations to industrial users who operate on a percentage base were Increased from 60 per cent to 75 per cent of their 1941 base period usage of April 1 Present plans call for a continuation of this Other 3rd quarter allocations included Military services 47000 tons U S territories 1000 tons and commercial and minor shipments 9000 tons rate cent from to 15 per 105 per cent on all above 400 The 15 per cent bracket was written in by the finance commit tee in answer to complaints that the original to spread of the 20 per cent bracket as voted by the wide house was too Iowa Man and Woman Killed in Auto Crash Molesber ry 39 son of Mr and Mrs Charles Molesberry of Plymouth and Mrs Pauline Watters about 27 both of Maquoketa were killed at 4 a m Thursday when the pickup truck in which they were riding on highway 64 8 miles east of here collided with a car driven by Lester James 25 of Preston James is in a Clinton hospital with chest and other injuries Molesberry was born in Ply mouth and spent his early life there In addition to his parents he leaves 3 sisters and 4 brothers It was expected the body would be taken to Plymouth Saturday or Sunday for burial The truck driven by Molesber ry a taxi driver was owned by his employer Vern Hute It was de molished Jackson county Sheriff Loren Felderman said Molesberry evi dently lost control of the truck as tracks showed he had driven about 30 feet in the road shoulder before colliding with the James car on the other side of the high way CORN PLANTING AT STANDSTILL Rain Snow and Sleet Halts Midwest Farmers Chicago work in the nations corn belt already long delayed by spring rains was near a standstill Thursday because of rain snpwandsleet andfarmers were warned a late spring frost may sweep across sections of the midwest Friday A mass of cold air from the Mackenzie basin in Canada ex tended over the area and tempera tures dropped to near freezing in many sections and below 32 de grees in parts of the Dakotas and Minnesota Snow fell to a depth of 12 inches in Nebraska to more than 5 inches in Wyoming and measured inches in Iowa Snow and sleet also swept over parts of Colorado Minnesota South Dakota and Wis consin The lowest temperature in the cold belt Wednesday was 15 above at Eckman N Dak In the corn belt work in the fields was further delayed by rains and snow with virtually no plant ing of corn this week in Illinois Indiana Ohio Wisconsin Kansas Iowa Michigan and Nebraska Soy bean planting which usually fol lows corn was reported far be hind In Iowa the Corn state 76 per cent of the corn acreage has been planted while Kansas and Nebraska reported about 70 pe cent In Illinois however the amount planted was listed at per cent about 25 per cent in Wisconsin 10 per cent in Indian and 7 per cent in Michigan No es timate was made for Ohio AGREE ON FINAL TERMS OF BILL TO CURB LABOR Conference Members Send Measure Back to House and Senate Washington conferees on legislation designed to check strikes and labor union activities reached final accord Thursday on a compromise bill An agreement to scrap a house provision which would have ex cluded food processors from col lective bargaining rights was the last action taken by the conferees before returning the measure to the house and senatefor further action Senator Taft ROhio told re porters the committee decided to remove this controversial section om the final draft and leave the alter to interpretation by the itional labor relations board This means it continues a mat r of dispute so far as the NLRB nd the courts are concerned Taft reported the compromise ill was approved by 7 of the 10 onferees Those who dissented are Sena or Murray DMont and Reps ioffman RMich and Lesmski The compromise agreement was pproved by Taft Senators Ives aN Ball RMinn and llender and Reps iartley RN Landis R and Harden DN Hartley told reporters the house lans to act on the final draft next iVednesday Then the measure will o to the senate The next stop will be the white ouse where President Truman must decide whether to approve r veto the bill Gael un lortant concessions to the senate iy the house conferees who igreed to abandon a nearblanket lan on industrywide collective argaining and a provision au horizing private employers to eek injunctions against some trikes and boycotts Here are the principal provi ions of the compromise bill The closed shop is outlawed The union shop is permitted only vhen a majority of workers vote or it The government can obtain 80 day injunctions against emergency strikes TRUMAN BACK IN WASHINGTON Washington Tru man returned to the capita Thursday from a 12day visit wit his ailing mother Mrs Marth Truman in Grandview Mo The presidents plane the Sa cred Cow landed at the Nationa air port at p m CST afte a flight from Kansas City Befor leaving there at a m CST Mr Truman had received assur ances that the condition of his 94 yearold mother is improved Secretary of the Treasury Sny der and top white house officia were on hand to welcome the pres ident Mrs Truman and thei daughter Margaret HOUSE PASSES FARM FUND BILL 6 Vote Margin Supports Million Compromise Figure in Measure Washington republi can congressional economy dnve was still rolling along Thursday but it was beginning to develop some squeaks By a slim 6vote margin and only after a 540000000 compro mise the GOP leadership shoved an agriculture de partment appropriation bill for 1948 through the house Wednes day night and over to the senate This brought to slightly over the claimed savings inthe house drive to cut 000000 from the presidents bud get for the year starting July 1 With only 5 more 1948 supply bills to be handled there were national AP Wirepholo 25 DRIVER ONLY Standley was only scratched when his car crashed through a guard rail near SanDiegoGaL andplunged 200 Jeet down this canyon Wednesday Pulled free of the wreckage Standley commented I always was lucky Iowas Vote Washington Iowa members of the house voted with the minority and the other 3 with the majority Wednes day when the house voted 180 to 174 to defeat a proposal tp increase appropriations for soil conservation payments and for the school lunch program and to boost the REAs lending authority Reps Cunningham Doltivcr Hoeven Martin and Tallc were on the losing side Reps Gwynne Jensen and Le Compete on the winning side All are republicans signs that the going may be tough if the goal is to be reached For the bills which make up the balance of the presidents overall spending 83 Per Cent Slash Looms for Army Fund Washington The armys 1948 military budget was cut 83 per cent by the house appropria tions committee Thursday despite testimony from peneral Eisen hower and Secretary Patterson that real danger lies beyond the irreducible minimum of men and money they had requested If congress upholds the com mittee the army will receive 240982423 in new appropriations for the fiscal year starting July 1 President Truman had asked 716791500 for the armys military activities exclusive of foreign re lief and other civil functions to be financed in a later bill For the current year military activities appropriations totaled 400 The committee thus slashed from next years re quests and cut be low current year funds It did however approve the armys lull request for 000 in contract authority to buy new airplanes In addition to the budget cuts the committee cancelled 000000 of money appropriated for the current and prior years but not spent The army concurred in the cancellation Its finance offi cers explained that A the money was not included in the 1948 bud get and B was no longer needed for the purposes for which it originally was appropriated The committee did not claim the cancelled as a sav ing in its goal to cut 000 from the presidents overall budget for next year but said the money if not rescinded might be spent By the committees action the unobli gated funds revert to the treas urys general fund The claimed budget cuts to date including the in the army bill approximate 000000 SENATE ADOPTS SETUP TO FREE CONTROL AREAS Proposal Would Require Lifting of Controls in 30 Areas Each Month BULLETIN Washington senate Thursday approved a volun tary 15 per cent Increase in rents Provision tor the In Increase by agreement between landlord and tenant was con tained in an amendment by Sen Albert W Hawkes R N 3 to a senate rent control bill The senate approved it 48 to 26 It would permit a 15 per cent increase in rents in where landlords and tenants volun tarily and in rood faith agree upon a new lease to extend through 1948 Federal rent con trols would be removed auto matically on Dec 31 1947 from housing units covered by such new leases Washington senate voted Thursday to remove at least 5 per cent of the nations rent from rent control each North Iowa Gardeners Are Warned of Possible Frost The three member national abor relations board gets two more members Judicial and pro secuting functions are separated with the latter assigned to the general counsel Jurisdictional strikes and secon dary boycotts are outlawed So are unioncontrolled health and welfare funds established since January 1 1946 A new federal mediation agency is set up Unions are made liable for un fairlabor practices and subject to suit for violation of contract They also can be sued for damages resulting from Jurisdictional strikes and secondary boycotts The involuntary checkoff sys tem of collecting union dues is banned A union would lose its collective bargaining rights under the Wag ner Act if any of its officers could reasonably be regarded as com munists Employers do not have to bar gain collectively with foremen The NLRB can forbid unions to charge dues or initiation fees which it regards as excessive or discriminatory Employers are assured freedom of speech in dealing with their workers provided their state ments are neither threatening nor coercive MacArlhurs Son Hurt Tokyo MacArthur 9yearold son of General MacAr thur is resting comfortably in a hospital after fracturing his left arm Wednesday while ice skating on a Tokyo rink the army an nounced Thursday Fruit Crop Escapes Cold Weather Damage After Late Snowfall North Iowa peered hopefully at sunny skies Thursday but the weatherman warned that those same clear skies were likely to bring frost during the coming night The sun arose on fields and housetops blanketed with the re mains of Wednesdays unseason able snowfall and by 9 a m the snow was only an unpleasant memory except for the moisture it left to plague farmers already late with field work The weather observers reported 52 inches of precipitation at Ma son City and estimated the snow fall at 4 inches although much of it melted as it fell County Extension Director Mar ion E Olson doubted that any damage was done by the 32 degree temperatures of Wednesday fore noon and early Thursday at Ma son City Tomatoes and tender flowers which were not covered may have been nipped he said but fruit trees would not be af fected Asked about the consequences of frost Thursday night he an swered that tomatoes should def initely be covered Fruit trees many of them in full bloom will not be hurt unless the mercury drops below 30 degrees he be lieves He admitted that it was a difficult question to answer be cause humidity would have a bear ing as well as temperature The snow was general through out North Iowa but little damage was reported At New Hampton electric service in the northwest part of the city was disrupted Wednesday evening by a fallen tree breaking a power line It caused a 25 minute delay in a re cital at St Josephs parochial school Iowa Falls reported a 31 degree temperature mark Wednesday aft ernoon The snowfall was the lat est in history in North Iowa Iowa Falls reported its previous record on May 15 1907 and Charles City on May 20 1892 In southern Iowa meanwhile streams and rivers were leaving their banks as continued heavy rains caused rising waters to spill over lowland areas Lowest temperature reported in estimateare for local rivers and harbors projects and the veterans administration in addition to the war department and some assorted federal agencies The appropriations committee may have trouble keeping repub licans in line when it comes to cutting funds for veterans and riversharbors projects Twelve of them joined a solid democratic front Wednesday night in a futile effort to add 000 for the school lunch program for the rural electrifi cation administrations lending fund and for soil conservation payments The ap propriations committee had or dered all 3 reductions Each move to make those in creases failed by a rollcall count of 180 to 174 as republican lead ers exerted their best efforts to get their votes to the floor There was no nosecount on the compromise which restored to the bill in socalled sec Iowa by the weather bureau was tion 3Z funas These are receipts 23 at Cherokee Other lows in cluded 24 at Spencer 26 at Alta and 27 at Onawa Inwood and Sioux City Crop experts said any imme diate assessment of the extent of damage was impossible and that first indications were that field crops above the ground probably would be merely retarded rather than destroyed Leslie M Carl head of the fed eral crop reporting service in Iowa said he feared that in spots rather extensive replanting of corn and soybeans might be necessary Statistician Carl said that corn which was up probably survived the freeze although it was likely that tips may have been damaged thus delaying the crop He said he doubted that the oats crop was hurt much if any although the cold probably would affect the yields Newly planted corn Carl said is probably the biggest question mark If the germ has swollen or if the sprout is just above the ground below freezing tempera tures probably will necessitate re planting he said It was expetced that truck gar dens might show extensive dam age in the northern western area and north from import duties used in the past to encourage the distribu tion and use of agricultural com modities The agriculture department had expected to receive from section 32 funds next year and to use of it for soil conservation payments But the appropriations commit tee cancelled the fund and influ ential republicans joined demo crats in the protest against that action Chairman Hope of the agriculture committee had threatened to offer an amendment restoring the entire sum and dem ocrats were ready to join him Averting a showdown Rep Dirksen RI1U floor manager for the appropriations committee offered the compro mise after consultation with Hope The house accepted it without de bate As it went to the senate the bill was or 287 per cent below budget requests As it had emerged from the appropriations committee it was or 32 per cent below the 318 asked by President Truman After the voting democrats and farm state republicans said they were confident the senate would restore some of the house cuts Despite the claims of Eisenhower andPatterson theoriginal budget estimate was the minimum consistent with efficiency and safely the committee insisted that its cuts would leave adequate funds for an army of 1070000 to perform the missions assigned to it More than of the total recommended reduc tion was leveled at war depart ment civilian and officer person nel The committee recommended cuts which it said would reduce civilian jobholders by 74631 and officer personnel by 20100 in cluding 2600 warrant officers It also ordered a reduction in flying pay for air corps personnel with out specifying how the cut should be applied No reductions were recom mended in the number of enlisted men nurses dietitians physiother apists or research and develop ment employes The committee said it believes the armys request for funds to retain 146000 officers is exces sive In support of that statement the lawmakers cited testimony given last year to the house mili tary committee in which the army listed the planned officer strength of the peacetime army at 100000 or roughly one officer for each 10 month The senate adopted an amend ment to a pending rent control bill offered by Sen Joseph R Mc Carthy R Wisi The amendment would require the housing expedi ter each month to remove controls from a minimum of 5 per cent of the total number of areas under control when the new rent bill becomes law McCarthy said there now are about 60 rent control areas Thus his amendment would require de control of about 30 each month The senate also approved an amendment by Sen Allen J El lender DLa to let public housing authorities evict public Housing tenafits tf their incomes were above the requirements for that type of housing Ellender said many people mak ing and a year ara now living in public housing proj ects and low income people should be allowed to move in Two republican senators pre dicted the state would approve voluntary 15 per cent boosts in rent ceilings where landlord and tenant agree on a lease through 1948 enlisted men Nevertheless the committee said the armys 1948 budget esti mates contemplated 135 per cent officer personnel or almost 3 per cent above wartime peak Of the 74631 reduction recom mended in civilian personnel 59 524 are employed in the zone of the United States outsde of Washington 3548 are departmental employes most of whom are in Washington 518 are industrial mobilization employes and 11041 are employed overseas The reductions if upheld by con gress will leave the army about 421000 civilian employes exclu sive of 30000 engaged in industrial production The cuts the commit tee estimated will save 216 Alaska Laughs Chicago ff The midwest shivered in unseasonal tempera tures while Alaska basked in mid summer heat The nations cold spot was Eck man N Dak near the Canadian border where the mercury dropped to 15 above In Fairbanks Alaska the high Wednesday was 88 while Anchor age reported 80 above Car Dealers Act to Stop Black Market Des M o i n e s plan de signed to thwart black market op erations in new automobiles has been adopted by a number of Des Moines car dealers Under the plan when a cus tomer buys a new auto he signs an option agreeing that in case he sells the car within 6 months the dealer shall be allowed to re purchase it for a predetermined price Iowa Flyers to Meet Ames than 500 fly ing farmers and other amateur flyers are expected to attend the annual meeting of the Iowa Fly SAME Black flu muni dutt In put 24 hour cerloili died in Americas last 4 wars Mrs Besle B Wilson war rec ords director for the state histor ical department said Thursday her files showed 24998 persons lost their lives as a result of the Civil war the SpanishAmerican war and the World wars I and II We still are adding to the list of dead in World war II she com mented Only the other day we added the name of an Iowa boy who long had ben listed as miss ing in action in the last war A very few of those are ones who entered the service after the close of the war Iowa sent approximately 300 000 of her boys and girls into World war II from which the 8235 failed to return Of the total war dead 1380 served In the navy marines and coast guard The remaining 6855 served in the More than 6000 of Iowas World war II dead still sleep in neatly kept U S military cemeteries The war departments program of returning bodies of recoverable World war II dead to this country for burial when such return is re quested by next of kin will get underway late this year In the Civil war which resulted in the observance of Memorial day Iowa lost 13001 A total of 76242 lowans entered that war While the number serving was less than onethird of those who went into World war II the loss was nearly twice as large loss was onehalf as many World war n One hundred eightyfour lowans lost their lives in the SpanishAmerican war Mrs Wil son had no figures on the number of lowans who participated in that conflict and said none was readily available Only 2 Civil war veterans re main in Iowa They are James P Martin mander of the 99 of Sutherland com of the Iowa department Army of the Re Nebr Mrs Wilson said she believed he reason for the heavy loss of life in the Civil war was first the close contact of fighting and second the inbality to give the wounded the care that was given in the later wars Her records showed the lowans lost in World war II included 12 women members of the WAVES Red Cross Marines Signal Corps WASPs and the WACf The first lowan killed in World war II was Malachi J Cashen of Lament a navy man who was killed in the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor Five lowans won the congres sional medal of honor in Woild war II 2 won it in World war one No records were kept on wars previous to World war II showing the number of families which lost more than one member Weather Report FORECAST Mason City Partly cloudy and continued cool with scattered light frost likely Thursday night Low Thursday night 3335 Fri day fair and considerably warm er Iowa Partly cloudy and cool Thursday and Thursday night with scattered light frost Thurs day night Friday fair and con siderably warmer Low Thurs day night 33 northeast to 37 southwest High Friday 6570 Minnesota Clearing Thursday night Freezing temperatures north and heavy frost south por tion Friday partly cloudy and warmer INMASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics for 24 hour period ending at 8 oclock Thursday morning Maximum 41 Minimum 32 At 8 a m Thursday 41 Precipitation 52 Total Snowfall 4 inches YEAR AGO Maximum 81 Minimum 47   

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