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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - April 30, 1947, Mason City, Iowa                                NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME fF AN MINES A THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS VOL fin ttnltrt Press Fun Leased Wire Five CnU Copy MASON CITY IOWA WEDNESDAY APRIL 30 Paper Consists ot Two SectionsSection One So 172 5 PHONE UNIONS SETTLE DISPUTES nmu IWCKAGEOF KOURITOWH Tornadic Winds Also Hit Communities in Iowa and Arkansas Worth Mo winds whipped through small towns in Arkansas Missouri and Iowa leav ing at least 21 dead Wednesday injuring more than 50 and causing thousands of dollars in property damage Hardest hit was this northwest nno ni wcat wi Missouri town with a population injured Community ir Iowa Razed by Tornado Clio Iowa tornado thg swept northeastward Tuesda after virtually leveling Worth Mo about 50 miles southwest o here smashed windows ripped o shingles and overturned oul buildings in this community o about 300 persons Clio apparently was the hard est hit town in Iowa in the wind rain and hail storms that move across the state High wind dam age to farm buildings in the Fleas anton and Lincvillc area south and west of Clio was reported No one was reported seriously 50 Are lniured of 233 Thirteen persons were killed and approximately 45 in jured Only half a dozen build ings in the town were left stand in At least 8 persons were killed in Arkansas where vicious winds Tuesday night lashed the small community of Bright Water and swept close to Garfield not far from the Missouri line A tornado also struck Clio a town of about 200 population in southwestern Iowa causing ex tensive property damage No loss of life was reported however The tornado that hit Worth swept through the center of the town wipingout the entire busi ness district Two of the towns 3 churches and its brick school house were among the buildings demolished Practically every tree in town was clipped off The community was in dark ness until late Tuesday night when a mobile generator arrived from a neighboring town Both the Salva tion Army and the Red Cross set up stations and homeless were The George Nickels family fled to their fruit cellar when they saw the tornado approaching theii farm 2 miles southwest of Clio The storm destroyed the farm home and buildings Pahl Thompson Northwestern Bell Telephone manager at Cory don Iowa who went down to the Nickels farm to repair wires gave this description to the Associatec Press The main part of the house was just picked up and laid down flat in splinters The barn anc other outbuildings all were just debris except one little hoghouse One horse was dead and an other blinded Other livestock was scattered and the chickens were all muddy and wandering around in kind of a daze 100 IOWA Woflh MISSOURI Joseph AP Wirephoto WHERE TORNADO This map shows 1 Worth Mo where the twister cut through the center of town and 2 Clio Iowa where heavy storm damage was reported Iowa Liquor Stores Will Lift Rationing Des Moines beverages being cared for in the few remain sold by the state liquor stores will ing residences still standing and be off the ration list effective in nearhv TU The Nickels had gone into their fruit cave when they saw the spout coming It touched the ground away from the house lift ed up and then came down and hit the house and barn and build ings Part of the buildings were left lying in the road about 50 feet away from the house Two large barns on the Vic Lo vett farm near the Nickels place were flattened by the winds In Clio many roofs were picked clean of shingles and nearly every window in the south part of town was blown out There were no windows left in the Methodist church and its chim neys were down and its sides bat tered A lumber yard in the town op erated by Albert Lewis and Frank Atkinson was badly damaged Though many piles of lumber were untouched the front end of the yard was smashed One man caught in the storm in the yard lay down by a truck and escaped injury in the flying debris Power and telephone lines were down The wind flipped over a garage but left unharmed a car that had been standing in the building A mattress was blown out of one home MISSOURI TOWN HIT BY aerial view shows the wreckage left by the tornado which swept through Worth Mo Tuesday afternoon Notice the houses AP Wircphoto torn apart in the foreground and the splintered wood scat tered over the area ewis Begins Teacher Saves Lives of 16 Pupils in Missouri Twister Battle for toal Contract in nearby towns Al Dopking Associated Press reporter who also covered the re cent Texas City Tex explosion disaster described the devastation here as greater proportionately than that at the Texas town There simply isnt anything left standing except a few homes at the south edge of town which the storm missed Dopking sala The center of town is wiped bare except for splintered wood bricks and other debris Mrs N A Combs 59 nurse said she first saw the tornado high in the air It had a long tail she said When it hit the ground there was a swirling dark cloud The point seemed to broaden and sweep ev erything before it There was a terrifying roar Mr and Mrs Bruce Pickering arrived just shortly after the tor nado hit and found their 2 chil dren Irene and Melvin and Mrs Pickerings mother dead in the ruins of their home Everything we had is the children the home the live stock everything said Pickering An indication of the force of the wind was given by an 8 foot 2 by 4 timber which had been driven completely through the body of a horse Just west of the city a tree stripped of small branches had several chickens impaled on the remaining branches Fred Jennings died in a queer twist of the Tornado Survivors reported he had joined 6 other persons in a cellar and was standing near the door when a gust of wind sucked him out and tossed him into a tele phone line His body was found Thursday except imported Scotch whisky the state liquor control commission announced Wednes day Dick E Lane commission chair man said Scotch still is very tight and that it must be limited to one bottle fifth per month per permit holder Actually the beverages which go off the ration list Thursday are bottled in bond straight blends of straight and Canadian whisky 75 feet from the cellar with the wire wrapped tightlv around his legs Weather Report FORECAST Mason City Partly cloudy with possibly scattered showers early Wednesday night becoming fair Thursday Cooler Low Wednes day night about 45 Iowa Partly cloudy and a few widely scattered showers in western and central portions early Wednesday night and in east Wednesday night becom ing generally fair Thursday Cooler Low Wednesday night 45 High Thursday 60 to 65 Minnesota Scattered light show ers Wednesday night possibly mixed with a little snow near Lake Superior ending most sec tions by Thursday morning and gradually clearing south and west portion Thursday IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics for 24 hour period ending at 8 oclock Wednesday morning 1 J Washington L Lew egan a new contract figh ednesday with one third of th ft coal industry determined I ock another nationwide wag greement The powerful Southern Coa Producers association served no tice at governmentsponsored pre liminary talks Tuesday that whil it is eager to make a contract will Lewis separately industrywid bargaining is impractical and un desirable from the standpoint o its members The southerners enjoyed a 1 cent an hour wage differentia until 1941 and generally speaking hope to make fewer concession this year than some of the other operator groups have indicatec they may be willing to gran Lewis The mine leaders first move was to challenge in effect the tonnage behind each of the opera tors lined up against a national agreement He demanded to know how much bituminous coal was pro duced by each of the 32 producer groups represented at the prelim inary session Some of the nego tiators represent subgroups of the larger operator associations COLONELDURANT IS CONVICTED Sentenced to 15 Years for Part in Gem Theft Frankfurt Germany Jack W Durant was sentenced Wednesday to 15 years at hard labor and dismissal from the U S army for participation in the bizarre theft of SI500000 of Hesse royal jewels from Kronberg castle After deliberating for 2 days the U S military court of 8 col onels convicted the 37 year old Chicago air force officer on counts These included theft smuggling jewels into the United States without payment of cus toms and signing another officers name without authority in an at tempt to hasten a discharge from the army Specifically the court found Durant guilty of stealing only worth of jewel collection which the army prosecution valued at Durants wife former WAC Maximum Minimum At 8 a m Wednesday YEAR AGO Maximum Minimum 6 49 63 S2 40 Capt Kathleen B Nash a form er country club manager at Phoenix Ariz was sentenced to 5 years at hard labor last Sept 27 for her part in the embezzle ment It is estimated that an average of 13 tanker ships arrive each day in U S north Atlantic ports By AL DOPKING w Mo 37 year old eacher was the heroin Wednesday of this tornadobattered and sorrowing town where al most a fourth of the population was killed or injured hv Tuesday devastating winds Mrs Anne Trump was credited with savinr the lives of her I pupils by herding them into a cave just before the tornado struck demolishing the school house Warned by a passerby that a strong wind was approaching Mrs Trump rushed outside with Max Lee Murdock one of the pupils They saw a cloud resembling a funnel Mrs Trump said it lookoc just like pictures we had in science classes I knew we had to find a cave and I tried to recall one nearby I finally thought of one about half a block away at Bill Setzers and I started the children into the cave As soon as I got the children n I started toward my mothers louse My mother is an invalid and I knew she would need help got about a block from Mary Harris house and I was walking right into the storm Mrs Harris was sick in bed and her sister Mrs Sam Holmes came to the door Just then the house began to shake and I ran tround to the back The back porch fell on me tnocking me to the ground tayed under it and covered m lead with my hands When Mrs Trump finally go lome she found her mother daze ut unhurt The mother although an in alid had managed to move from he west part of the house which rohably saved her life because hat side was damaged Back at the cave Max Lee Mur ock related the older pupils erded the younger ones in firs nd closed the door behind them he oldest was Jerry Alice 14 nd the youngest Beulah Mabbitt a first grader Max said he and Jerry got trough the doorway as the orm hit slamming the door jus s the cover over it was blown f The smaller children cried e said but the older ones trieo comfort them As Mrs Trump walked into the storm she related she took quick look back over her shoulder to see if all her pupils were under When I looked back I saw the school already was gone she re lated I walked a few more yards and took one more look and saw the town disappear I felt sure my children were safe for I had seen no sign of them a few moments before Then the terrifying black cloud seemed to engulf me It loomed like a huge black monster at first then it seemed to turn yellow and I felt a great suction as I reached he Harris place I at first sought shelter in the house but then a gust of wind began to shake the place like a backlashing rope I dashed around the house to the back and was trying to reach the cave when the back porch col apscd It knocked me down and crawled farther beneath it for AP Wircphoto MRS ANNA TRUMP of Tornado protection shielding my head with my hands As soon as I felt the gust of wind pass I rushed on home to see what had happened to mother When I found she was all right I started back lo the Setzer cave io see about my children They had climbed out of the cellar and were on the way to my mothers slace to see what had happened to me When I saw them I knew some power greater than me had saved them Senate Votes Against Split in Labor Bill Washington senates republican majority batted down Wednesday a proposal to split the big catchall labor disputes bill into 4 separate measures The vote was 59 to 35 Defeat of the proposal spon sored by Senator Morse gave the republican leadership a victory in the first senate test on legislation to curb unions and strikes Morse proposed lo send the pending omnibus measure back to the labor committee for a 4way division He and those who backed lim contended that it would as sure some labor legislation during this session of congress They argued that President Truman might veto an omnibus bill if it contained provisions he did not like They said he might accept some of the measures if 4 separate pieces of legislation were sent to him Senator Taft chair man of the G O P policy com mittee opposed Morses move He argued that since the house al eady has passed an omnibus labor ill it would be impractical for he senate to carve its measure nto 4 bills There is no reason for it ex ept one Taft declared and hat is a political one giving the aresident the right to reject por ions of the program and accept thers He said he believes Mr Truman has changed his position since e vetoed the Case labor bill last ear and I hope very much he vill sign the bill as it is presented o him Morses move got major sup ort from democrats House Slashes Foreign Aid Million Washington h c nous Wednesday passed and sent to th senate a S200000000 general foi eign relief bill after standing pa on its previous decision to slas from the fund President Truman had aske for in postUNRR aid for the warstricken countrie The administration hoped the sen ate would restore the 515000000 to the bill The funds would be used to pro vide food clothing and other re lief supplies to 5 warravage European nations and China The house also voted 324 to 75 to add an amendment o the re lief hill to bar aid to communist dominated countries unless thcj agree to supervision of distribu lion by American missions Shortly before beginning thi roll call vole on passage the housi shouted down a motion to recom mil the measure to the foreign af fairs committee The committee Iowas Vote Washington A Iowas 8 member house delegation all republicans voted solidly Wed nesday for both amendments to the 5200000000 foreign relief hill and for passage of the bill itself The amended bill was passed and soul lo the senate vould have been instructed to give it further study until the ecretary of state reports that his epartment has been organized o a truly anticomrnunistic pol cy Other changes in the measure ipproved by the house included 1 A proviso naming the relief ecipients as Austria Poland It iy Greece Hungary and China nd setting aside to be sed for emergency relief pur oses in any other nations found o be needy 2 A provision allocating 515 00000 as an initial U S contri ution lo the United Nations in childrens emergency und 3 An amendment restricting lief purchases outside the United tales to a maximum of 10 per ent of the total appropriation 4 A provision authorizing the opointment of a relief adminis subject to senate confirma on who would be responsible to ie president 5 A requirement that recipient overnments deposit in a special ccount any proceeds received om the sale of relief supplies hese funds thus could be used Purchase additional supplies 6 A proviso requiring that eaty reparation payments by re pient countries be postponed uring the period the U S is irnishing relief ggs Hurled as Phone rackets Stage Parade Sioux Falls S Dak erics of demonstrations were held icre late Tuesday and Tuesday light by striking telephone work rs outside the Northwestern Bel Telephone Co building No violence was reported al hough employes who remained n the job were soundly scorned nd termed scabs by pickets large crowd gathered lo watch ic proceedings Union members charged with hurling eggs gainst the building late Monday s they paraded around it shout and sinemc ar Accident Injuries Are Fatal to Man 44 Davcnporf 1 e m e n t L Reilly 44 crew manager for a magazine concern who was in jured Monday night when struck ms by an automobile died Wednesigood day It was the 6th traffic fatality in Davenport this year SUI STUDENT IS KILLED IN CRASH 6 Others Injured in Iowa Auto Collision Iowa City SUI stu dent was killed and 6 other per sons including 2 wellknown ath letes were injured in an auto col lision near Wilton Junction at about midnight Tuesday night Howard A Falk 21 student from Dubuque died cnroule to the hospital when a car contain ing 5 young men from SUI col lided with one in which 2 Wilton Junction girls were reported mak ing a turn The injured were Dick Hoerner 24 Hawkeye full back from Dubuque who suffered possible 2 sprained ankles and other injuries Noble Jorgcnsen 21 former SUI basketball center from Pitts burgh who left school at mid year to play professional He un derwent an operation Wednesday morning for internal injuries but his condition was SAME Black flit meant traffic death Id past M hoor rfrind Joseph B Wells student from Boone who suffered a broken leg and head injuries His condition was reported satisfactory Wednes day George H McNeil 26 student from New Sharon who suffered internal injuries His condition was reported satisfactory Dorothy Marine 19 of Wilton Junction who suffered a brain concussion and was in serious condition Audrey Hiit 21 of Wilton Junction who suffered a broken jaw facial cuts and severe in ternal injuries and also was in serious condition PENNSYLVANIA AND NEW YORK STRIKES ENDED Michigan Workers Turn Down Bell Offer of to Weekly Hikes Washington unions of 43000 telephone workers in New York and Pennsylvania called off strikes Wednesday accepting con tracts for wage increases ot to a week None is affiliated with the Na tional Federation of Telephone called the na tionwide tieup April their actions arouse optimism among government labor concilia tors for an early end to the strike of 300000 NFTW unionists Joseph A Beirne president he NFTW said that it showed the 3cll Telephone systems solid wall of opposition to wage in creases is crumbling He made that comment in a statement as negotiations were re sumed here aimed at bringing about a national settlement Beirne added that the NFTWs 33 unions will maintain our picket lines until our entire dis pute is settled A spokesman for the Michigan ouncil of the National Federation if Telephone Workers said Wed nesday that a Michigan Bell Tele ihone company offer of S2 to Si veckly wage increases to striking employes is not acceptable The statement came from Carl Kelb publicity director of the Michigan Council of Affiliates ot he NFTW which includes the triking Michigan Federation of elephpne Employes an indcpend nt union A weekly wage increase was he chief demand made by the Vow York and Pennsylvania un ons as it is with the NFTW Four of these unions are in the Vew York City metropolitan area t was announced that the agree ment they reached provides Ending of the strike Wednesday V general weekly wage in rcase effective Thursday main enance of union dues for mem crs beginning Thursday pensions nd benefits to remain undimin hed during contract period an xlra day of vacation for a holi ay falling during vacation period lus improved oneweek vacation eatmcnt No discrimination by either arty for strike or nonstrike ac vities fringe issues to be nego ated at departmental levels ther party may reopen the wage uestion once during the oneyear fetirne of the agreement The settlement in Pennsylvania as reached by a union with 6000 aintenance workers It agreed to weekly wage increases for orkers getting less than and 4 for those now making over S51 A big question left by the agrec ents was whether the members these unions would respect eket lines of the NFTW workers ill on strike NFTW officials said they ex ecled the independent unionists do so But some government labor conciliators took the view that the agreements provided for a return to work and hence the independents would feel bound by that Frank J Fitzsimmons president of the Western Electric Employes association a telephone affiliate asserted that the New YorkPenn sylvania agreements represented a sell out of fellow telephonework ers adding There will be no settlement under as far as we are con cerned Telephone workers cant live on S3 and increases when the rest of the country is getting 1 Fitzsimmons and Henry Mayer attorney for a group of telephone unions said they do not believe the rank and file members in New York would ratify the settlement there 1 dont understand why they signed for that figure unless the leaders were pushed into some thing Mayer said A government official partici pating in the Pennsylvania nego tiations who asked not to be named said the contract terms likely will set the pattern for a national settlement He added that unionmanagement talks un derway in Washington might wind up with an agreement in less than 48 hours The maintenance workers in volved in the Philadelphia agree ment belong to the Federation ot Telephone Workers of Pennsyl vania an independent union not affiliated with the National Feder ation of Telephone Workers which called t h e nationwide strike April 7 Four sets ot wage talks are un derway in the crosscountry strike with the Western Electric phase apparently making the most prog ress toward a settlement   

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