Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - April 28, 1947, Mason City, Iowa                                ttF H I i y AN J ABCHI 5 NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NOftTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS VOL Pw ud UnJttd Full Wire Cttttf Cojgrl MASON CITY IOWA MONDAY APRIL 88 This Paper Conilstt of Two One HOME EDITION No HO IOWA UNION REJECTS PHONE OFFER One Mans Opinion A Radio Commentary By W EARL HALL Managing Editor BROADCAST SCHEDULE JCGLO Mutti Cilj Sooir KM p m WTAD QilicT I1L MID D U WOI ABH 4 m WIVL CUT ThoriJT p m A Living Monument to Iowas Future IN my last commentary I visited with you about the medical service to indigents given by the state hospital at the University of Iowa This time I want to give you some history connected with the development of this great medical center A half century ago medical education in America was un believably meager In 1905 An drew Carnegie established the Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching Its primary purpose was to set up retirement allow ances for college professors but was set aside to inves tigate education itself One of the first such studies undertaken had to do with med ical colleges in U S and Canada Dr Henry S Pritchett first pres ident of the foundation chose for this work a comparatively young man Abraham Flexner Instruc tions were brief Visit every medical college and tell the truth about them Dr Flexner did His find ings were published in a bul letin The report included a his tory and appraisal of medical edu cation up to 1908 The author hewed to the line and let the chips fall where they might He found little to commend much to condemn With the exception of Johns Hopkins practically all aur medi cal schools were what might be called practitioner schools None had hospitals of their own They were dependent on the hospitals in the cities where they were situated and even these were not used clinically to any great ex tent Entrance requirements were meager Teaching was mostly didactic by means of lectures and textbooks Anatomy physiology biology and chemistry were fairly well taught but of clinical in struction there was very little More often than not doctors en tered their practice without ever having been in a sick room Dr Chappell Founder of Clinic Dies Clear E E Chappell 67 founder and operator of th Chappell osteopathic clinic whicl for years has drawn many patients to this community from practical ly every state in the union died early Monday morning at a hos pital in Macon Mo He had been in failing health since last fall At the bedside of the osteopath physician at the time of his death were his wife and 2 daughters Mrs Henry Thomas of Clear Lak and Mrs T R Sherman of Balti more Md A son Dr E L Chap pell who has been associated with his father in operation of the clinic the past 3 years and a broth er Dr W C Chappell Mason City also survives Dr Chappell was born in Canada and was graduated from the Kirks ville School of Osteopathy a Kirksville Mo He came to Clear Lake more than 30 years ago Wards funeral home will be in charge of services but arrange ments have not yet been com pleted lie ijc ijt iji ijt DR E E CHAPPELL this report was pub a howl went up all WHEN lished over the land Medical colleges everywhere were panic stricken The truth had hurt The result was that 35 per cent of the colleges of medicine in the U S and Canada went out of business Others began to be what they are bow real institutions for the education and training of medical doctors OUR own Iowa college of medi cine came in for some sharp criticism Its dean lived in Du buque and spent 1 day a week on the campus The chief surgeon lived is Sioux City and spent 2 days a week on the campus Others on the faculty were practitioners in Iowa City Dav enport Muscatine etc They were competent teaching medicine was not their principal business Besides facilities lab oratory and otherwise were pa thetically inadequate There were complaints that Dr Flexner had been unjust in his report So he was ordered back to Iowa City to check his findings In addition an independent inves tigator a Virginia medical dean studied the Iowa setup Flexner refused to change so much as a comma and Dean Whitehead sus tained him ALL of this happened at the time Iowas state board of education was coming into being Its mem bers were both astounded and be wildered Their first idea was to eliminate clinical instruction limiting the college of medicine to the sciences underlying a medi cal course premedicine so called and letting the students after 2 years go where they pleased for clinical instruction Fortunately this first impulse was not acted on It was decided instead to put the matter squarely up to the leg islature informing that body what it would cost to have a firstclass college of medicine and letting the decision be made there case for building a worthy college of medicine is con tained in the first biennial report made by the newlycreated state board of education to the governor and the general assembly The legislature by decisive vote CONTINUED ON PAGE 2 36 INJURED IN TRAIN ACCIDENT Southern Pacific Flyer Derailed in California Ontario Cal Thirtysix persons were injured 3 seriously when the Southern Pacifics New Orleansbound Argonaut passen ger train struck a broken rail at Guasti4 miles east of here Sun day night Only the locomotive 2 baggage cars and the last 2 Pullmans of the 18car train stayed on the track The others were derailed but remained upright although several hundred yards of track was torn up The side of one coach the 4th behind the baggage cars was sheared away by another car but only 3 passengers were seated on that side of the aisle railroad men said MARSHALL HAS HOPE IN STAND AGAINST RUSSIA Believes Firm Policy May Make USSR Give Ground on Demands Wives Outdo Fishermen Without Fishing Tackle Kansas City best J H Crowley and Clem Luckner could do in a days fishing was a total catch of 3 small crappie After they gave up and rowed to shore at Houston lake near here their wives went for a boat without any fishing came back with a 5pound bass The big fish the women said simply leaped into the boat Stasseti in U S New York E Stas sen former governor of Minnesota and an avowed candidate for the 1948 republican presidential nom ination arrived at La Guardia field Monday after a 2month tour of Europe Wash ngton America hopes for an easing in U Ssovie tensions were buoyed Monday b reports that Secretary of Stal Marshall believes this country firmness on European peace treat issues may leave Russia to giv ground Marshalls view was laid tefor congressional leaders at a whit house conference in advance of hi radio report to the nation at oclock Monday night o the results of the Moscow foreig ministers conference Some of those who attended th 2 hour session with the presiden and his cabinet officer Sunday night said they came away wit he impression that Marshall be lieves the unbending attitude h displayed at the Big Four meeting already has had the effect of mak ing the Russians less sure of them selves in their demands affecting he future peace of Europe The soldierdiplomat was sail o have counseled patience wit he Soviets in the hope that a hey digest the American position n the next few months they may go to London for the next foreign ministers huddle in November nore amenable to suggestion rom their wartime allies on vita loints involved in proposed Aus ian and German peace treaties For this reason Marshall was said to have told the congressional eaders he believes it is too early now for this country to decide whether it should take the unset led Involving those treatiei o the United Nations general as embly for an airing The secretary was said to have elated that proposed American ction to bulwark Greece and urkey against communism ap eared to have made a profound mpression on the Russian people nd their leaders despite the fact lat this program was kept out of ie official discussions at the doscow conference It was represented as Marshalls elief that when the Soviets have ad additional time to think over the attitude taken by the Ameri can delegation plus the presidents GreekTurkish proposal they may be more willing to compromise some of the issues 4 INJURED IN GASOLINE FIRE Believe Short Circuit Started Iowa Blaze Council Bluffs gasoline fire injured 4persons and nearly destroyed the loading ramp and 2 tank trucks at the National CoOp erative Refinery association tank farm south of Council Bluffs early Monday Injured were Albert G Stroth rs Council Bluffs loading at endant who broke his foot leap ng to the ground Paul Rankin 30 Sioux City tank truck driver ace burns Harry Christensen 37 Sioux City burned when he was blown out from under a truck where he was adjusting valves and Don Schultz 22 Magriet Nebr Rankins tank truck whichwas destroyed belonged to Petroleum arriers of Sioux Falls S Dak Strothers said he saw a flash rom a remote control switch anc expressed belief a short circuit lad started the blaze A A Gil ert of Council Bluffs manager of he tank farm said a preliminary urvey indicated damage would xceed A south wind lowing flames away from the anks was believed to have pre vented the fire from spreading to he storage area Proud Papa at 72 Says Sleep Is Secret of Staying Young Chicago 72 year old grandfather who has just become th father of a baby boy said Monday the secret of staying young is tc get plenty of sleep Robert M Good a speed crane operator in a manufacturing plant said he always Is in bed by 8 oclock every night and always gets ui at 3 in the morning Goods wife Anna 44 gave birth to a 6 pound son Philip Marti Good the couples 3rd child They have 2 daughters Mrs Anna Ma Collins 26 herself the mother of a 3 year old child and Delore Good 17 Good says he smokes dances and sometimes takes a drink It does a fellow good he said I feel as young as a man of 35 AP Wlrephoto ROBERT Papa at 72 His Son Philip for 1st Time Set Funeral Rites Wednesday for W J Hughes Mason City Superintendent Dies Suddenly in Missouri of Pneumonia Girl 15 Waits for Nose to Grow Back on After Accident Los Angeles a surgical dressing that looked like a football players noseguard Ester Yvonne Brooks 15 quietly sculp tured figurines Monday while she waited for her nose to grow back in place It was sheared off in an automobile accident a week ago and stitched in place 4 hours later by Dr G 3 S Rambo plastic surgeon For a while it appeared that the nose had been lost but 2 sheriffs deputies found it after a 2 search So far Im encouraged said Dr Rambo On the 10th post operative day Friday when dressings are removed we will know definitely what measure of success has been attained Ears and noses have been sutured o their original sites by Plastic surgeons many times in the past Sometimes the efforts to avoid mutilation have been suc cessful sometimes the best ef forts have met with failures Esther Inglewood high school spohomore and daughter of Mrs Raymond Brooks complained of no pain and said she can recognize nrinrs Funeral services for William ohn Hughes 65 superintenden f the Peoples Gas and Electri ompany power plant since 1912 ill be held Wednesday at 10 a at St Josephs Catholic church ith Father P J Behan official ng Mr Hughes died sudderil aturday afternoon at Excelsio prings Mo of pneumonia Mr Hughes was born at Tal arn Wales England Oct 16 881 the son of W J and Eliza eth Ann Pritchard Hughes H ame to the United States with is parents in 1883 settling a shkosh Wis and as a boy and oung man assisted his father in arming In 1897 he assisted in construc ng testing and installing the firs erticle turbine engine west o hicago In 190506 he was assist nt to the general superintenden nd master mechanic of the Phil delphia Western Electric rail road Beachwood Park Philadel phia Penn From 1907 to 1912 he was chief engineer of the Musca tine Lighting company then the youngest chief west of the Missis sippi river In 1912 he became chief en gineer of the Peoples Gas Electric company Mason City anc in 1918 became superintendenl o the plant of the subsidiary Unitec Light Power company He was supervisor of Ihe installations on the grounds of the company anc was recognized for his wbrk in beautifying the grounds and in stallations of Christmas and holi day season displays He was a past member and con sultant of the Mason City water board was past president of the Mason City Unit No 5 National Association of Power Engineers vice president of the Kiwanis club treasurer of St Josephs Athletic association a member of the Elks club member of the board of di rectors of Elmwood cemetery prime member of the Missouri Valley Electrical association past district deputy and grand knight of the Knights of Columbus and a member of St Josephs Catholic church Surviving are his wife Anna rlughes 6 children John W Hughes Edward T Hughes Mrs John Gerard W J Hughes W J Hughes Jr and Mrs Donald Seddens all of Mason City and R J Hughes Birmingham Wash and 6 grandchildren Two sisters Mrs Lydia Reese ihicago Mrs Thomas H Roberts Columbus Wis anci a brother Dwen Hughes N Dak and a lalf brother Leslie Davies Edlor ado Wis also survive The body will lie in state at the Hughes residence 1516 S Dcla varc until the time of services W J Hughes The Rosary will be said by the Knights of Columbus at 7 p m Monday and by thp Holy Name Society at 8 p m Monday St Josephs Tabernacle Society will say the Rosary at 4 p m Tuesday The Catholic Daughters of America will say the Rosary al 9 p m Tuesday Burial will be at Elmwood cem etery The Meyer funeral home in charge GOVERNORBLUE SIGNS MEASURE ONCLOSEDSHOP Bill Will Become Law Upon Publication in 2 Iowa Newspapers Des Moines Robert D Blue Monday signed the legisla tive bill outlawing closed shop an union shop agreements betwee workers and employers in Iowa The enrolled bill now goes tc the secretary of states office an will become law within the nex few days when It Is offlclall published in Z Iowa newspapers A second restrictive labor that which prohibits seconder boycotts and jurisdictional strike approved by the legislatur in the closing days of the 194 session but has not yet reachei the governors desk The naticlosed shop bill make it unlawful to deprive any lowan of the right to work because h is or is not a member of a labo union It also forbids an employer de ducting union dues from a work ers paycheck without his writ ten approval Iowa became the 13th stale to enact a law banning the closet shop The other states where similar measures have been approvec since 1944 are Arizona South Da cota Nebraska Arkansas Flor da Texas North Carolina Ten nessee North Dakota New Mex co Georgia and Virginia 4 Hurt Seriously in Passenger Train Wreck Warsaw Bid 4 per sons were hurt seriously enough o require hospital attention as 10 cars of the Golden Triangle pas enger train of the Pennsylvania left the tracks at a cross iver in the center of Warsaw Monday morning All of the 147 passengers were shaken international Harvester Dffers 15 Cent Hourly Wage Hike to Employes Chicago IP International harvester company Monday of ered a 15 cents an hour wage in crease to 62000 employes in 21 factories represented by 11 un ons and said the offer would not affect the companys present level of prices The huge farm equipment con cern last month annnounced price eductions on its products which t said would mean a avings annually to users The wage offer following the latiern of wage settlements grant id to nearly 1000000 workers in he steel automobile and electri al industry calls for a general vage increase of Hi cents hourly ilus 6 paid holidays The company said its offer was lot extended to its steel division vhich employs 4000 workers at ie south Chicago plant of the Wisconsin steel works A company pokesman said this division is epresented by the Independent regressive Steel Workers union nd wage negotiations are in prog ess there In 1939 Britain was importing etween 7 and 8 million tons of vestork feed annually Weather Report FORECAST Mason City Cloudy and warmer Monday night with scattered light showers becoming gener ally fair and somewhat warmer Tuesday Lowest Monday night about 50 owa Mostly cloudy with scat tered light showers Monday night and in extreme east Tues day morning becoming gen erally fair Tuesday Warmer Monday night and in east and central portions Tuesday Low Monday night around 50 High Tuesday 6874 east and 7580 west Hinnesota Partly cloudy and warmer Monday night with scattered light showers east por tion Generally fair and mild Tuesday IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics for a 24hour period ending at 8 oclock Monday morning Maximum 57 Minimum 35 At 8 a m Monday 48 YEAR AGO Maximum 57 Minimum 46 GlobeGazette weather statistics for 24 hour period ending at 8 oclock Sunday morning Maximum 75 Minimum 41 At 8 a m Sunday 42 High Sunday 56 YEAR AGO Maximum 60 Minimum 28 Reds Seek to Delay Action on Palestine New York Russia sought late Monday to delay ac tion on Arab demands that the special Palestine session of the United Nations assembly broaden its program to include considera tion of immediate independence for the Holy Land Informed quarters said Soviet Delegate Andrei A lent thus far on the Palestine moved to postpone a meeting of the lination steer ing committee scheduled for Mon day afternoon to decide on the as semblys agenda Gromyko was said to have asked that the committee delay its meet ing until Tuesday morning He gave no reason for his request At present the agenda is limited to one item Britains proposal to set up a factfinding committee which would make a prelimin ary study of the Palestine question and report to the regular assem bly meeting in September The committee also will have to consider the rival demands of the official Jewish agency and the Hebrew committee of national lib eration that they be permitted to participate in the debates of the special Palestine session without a vote The 5 Arab Syria Saudi Arabia Lebanon and proposed the addi tion of an item calling for immedi ate ending of Britains 25 year old league of nations mandate over the Holy Land HIGHWAY DEATH TOLL UP T0 144 3 Person Are Fatally Injured in Accidents By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Iowas traffic death toll rose to 143 over the weekend as 3 persons were fatally Injured in accidents Saturday night Harrison County Coroner Har old Hennessy said Monday he planned an Inquest into the death of Mrs Paul Biggins 50 mother f 5 children who died in an On awa hospital Saturday of injuries uffered in an accident late Sat urday night on highway 75 2 miles north of Mondamin Hennessy said Mrs Higgins her rotherinlaw John Carbaugh Sioux fisherman and Floyd Harper and his wife Verna were iccupants of a car which was in ollision with an auto driven by Atwell Little Sioux farmer Carbaugh Harper and Mrs Harp r were reported in serious condi ion at the Onawa hospital Nicholas Kanellis 55 Cedar lapids restaurant proprietor was tilled late Saturday while cross ng a street in a Cedar Rapids res dential district Police said John Meyers 25 of Cedar Rapids lad been charged with reckless riving Mrs May Stauffer was fatally njured and her sister Mrs Irene tauffer suffered a broken pelvis nd other injuries in a carpedes rian accident at Sac City Sunday ight Sheriff W J Stewart said the widows in their struck by a car vomen ighties both were riven by Neil Richardson 21 of ear Sac City as they were cross ng a street Mrs Stauffer died bout an hour after the accident SAME Bliek Ui mcint tnfllo U U boot Wins Battle With Sea After 9 Hours of Clinging to Cushion Beaufort S Car in his grim struggle with the sea during which he would promise himself only to live 10 minutes longer Clayton Boardman wealthy oil company executive rested Monday from the ordeal of 9 hours in the water Boardman 56 of Augusta Ga one of 4 men swept seaward by an ebb tide Saturday when their 16foot fishing boat swamped clung to a small cushion until the sea washed him ashore early Sunday The body of one of his companions has been recovered The other two men still are missing I promised myself I would try to stay up just 10 minutes longer he told Sheriff J R McTeer When that 10 minutes was up Id say 0 myself youve gone this try another 10 minutes A shrimp boat came within 125 eet of nic and then went away I felt my last chance had gone and I was lost for good but somehow I kept hanging on The same tirte which brought Boardman to safety washed ashore the body of Dr Harry Goodrich 73 also of Augusta and a former dean of the University of Georgia medical school Two Negroes from the boat Nat Sweetman and Nath an Jenkins still are missing OFFICIAL SAYS PAY HIKE IS NOT ENOUGH Negotiators in St Paul Told Is Minimum Union Will Consider By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Action of the Iowa directors of the Northwestern Union of Tele phone Workers in rejecting a Northwestern Bell offer of a wage boost was upheld at a meet ing of 300 rank and file union members in Des Moines Monday A R Toepfer Iowa secretary of the union announced that the 5 statc general union board nego tiating in St Paul had been ad vised of the Iowa stand J D Risser Iowa union presi dent told the meeting the union in Iowa is still holding out at present for a boost Risser disclosed that the unions general board at St Paul had come progressively down in weekly wage demands finally reaching across the board That too was rejected by the company he said The company didnt budge from its offer Risser said the reason the Iowa union rejected the offer was that the company was trying to force an acceptance of lower wages in the middle west and south before they gave a higher offer to the east and west tele phone companies in the Bell sys tem Toepfer explained the Iowa unions decision also would have to be joined in by at least 2 others of the 5 states involved to become binding on the negotiators The other states involved are Minne sota Nebraska North and South Dakota As far as were concerned a a week boost is the minimum of fer wellconsider at present Toepfer said Theyve got to come across with something better than before well consider it The weekly wage hike of fer for 17500 workers in 5 mid western states had been an nounced by G o v Luther W Youngdahl of Minnesota Striking Omaha telephone work ers met Monday and rejected a proffered weekly raise of Marion A Gross president of the Nebraska board of the North western Union of Telephone Work ers said the strikers declared they will go back to work for a week more and not until then The rejection notice was sent to negotiators in St Paul In Lincoln Nebr James Smith president of the United Union of Telephone Workers representing strikers in 23 southeastern Ne braska counties said the Lincoln Telephone and Telegraph company has not yet offered anywage in crease Amid talk of closepending de velopments the labor department in Washington D C Monday drove ahead in tripleheader con ferences to end the telephone strike Department officials tipped re porters to watch for developments Monday afternoon President Jo seph A Beirne of the striking na tional federation of telephone workers said in Pittsburgh he ex pects a major break possibly Monday or Tuesday The source of this optimism was not ex plained Labor department meetings in volving 3 system long distance division Western Electric company and Southwestern Bell Telephone company were in progress or scheduled The Northwestern negotiations are among the more than 20 in volving Bell company subsidiar ies throughout the nation All the companies have offered to arbi trate the wage issues in dispute But until the Northwestern pro posal none had agreed to even a token wage raise The strikers cut their wage de mand from S12 to a week last Friday to match the 15 cent hour ly boosts granted in steel auto and other industries Opinion persisted among those familiar with behindthescenes moves in the walkout that if the strikers lines held solid Monday start of the 4th week of the Bell system might be gin to offer other wage increases in place of the arbitration plans While a settlement by the Northwestern group would have to be submitted to the policy com mittee of the National Federation of Telephone Workers at Wash ington a spokesman noted that the 39 striking affiliates are au tonomous and could vote to over ride the policy committee if they desired Union officials said that the Northwestern companys proposed S250 increase would not neces sarily set the pattern for the nation   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 145+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication