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Mason City Globe Gazette: Wednesday, April 23, 1947 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - April 23, 1947, Mason City, Iowa                                MINCC AflCHI YES NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME VOL un Aisocttted PTMJ and United Pros Cull Leased MASON CITY IOWA WEDNESDAY APRIL 23 1947 SOLONS OK IOWA LABOR MEASURE fnil l Tft flllTI Atlf AUTO UNION TO SEEK STRAIGHT 15 CENT BOOST UAW Council Votes to Demand Hike From GM Without Any Strings Detroit CIO United Auto Workers 200man national General Motors council voted unanimously Wednesday to de mand from the corporation a straight 15cent hourly wage in crease without any strings at tached General Motors had turned down the 15cent union proposal following a 2J hour extraordinary negotiating session Tuesday night The UAWs top negotiators will take the councils ultimatum back to another conference with the corporation Rejection of General Motors latest offer of Hi cents hourly wage hike and an additional 3i cents for 6 annual holidays pay came in a voice vote by the na tional council after President Wal ter P Reuther had strongly rec ommended that action In a speech lasting an hour and a half the redhaired Reuther re iterated in strong language that the auto workers should press for a straight 15cents increase with out General Motors telling us how we should spend it At the dose of Tuesday nights session Reuther charged GM with an arrogant arbitrary attitude in demanding acceptance of its offer of Hi cents hourly with an additional 3i cents for the 6 holidays There was no GM comment UAW dissatisfaction with the GM proposal basis of a settlement between the corporation and the CIO United Electrical Workers and United Rubber Workers stems from the auto workers wish to decide how they want to spend their money Reuther explained at a pressconference Against the company offer to put nearly a third of the boost into payments for holidays the union put forth a counterproposal that the increase be paid as a flat raise or used in part for a social security and retirement plan The GM workers never asked for paid holidays Reuther as serted They want social security and an old age retirement plan The union demands involve not only wages but the closelyallied problems of security for the work ers GM has said We will give you 15 cents an hour but you will have to spend it just as we give it to The CIOUEW accepted the General Motors offer because they wanted paid holidays Reuther said and added and thats their business However he said GM employes considered long term protection more important The UAWs new proposals cut more than a 3rd from the unions original 23i cent hourly demand Austria Peace Pact Problem May Go to UN Moscow of State Marshall said Wednesday that if the Austrian peace treaty is not completed by September the United States favorsreferring the whole problem to the general as sembly of the United Nations A highly placed American in formant said on leaving the coun cil of foreign ministers where Marshall said the Russians had not altered their position on the deadlocked issues of the Austrian treaty that it looked as if the council would adjourn sine die Thursday In a swift moving session Mar shall told the council also that the Russians had rejected the Ameri can proposal for a 4power Ger man disarmament treaty Replying to this charge Rus sian Foreign Minister V M Molo tov said that it was the United Stales which had blocked it by re jecting the soviet amendments proposed to such a treaty Meanwhiledelegations were packing and from all appearances the visiting diplomats and their staffs expected to be gone from Moscow within 3 or 4 days after the conference ends EXWARDEN AT SING SING DIES Lewis Lawes Succumbs to Cerebral Hemorrhage Garrison N Y E Lawes 63 who for 21 years was warden at Sing Sing prison a Ossining N Y and was one o the nations outstanding authori ties on prison problems died early Wednesday at his home here Lawes had been seriously il for 10 days He died of a cerebra hemorrhage at a m at hi home Beverly House Farms a this Hudson river community H had retired from his post at Sinj Sing July 16 1941 While warden at the big house at Ossining Lawes virtually re juilt the prison and institutec many novelties such as footba games between the prisoners am nutside teams Their first wa ivith the Port Jervis police team Prison dramatic clubs also wer permitted to perform for visitor torn the outside Weather Report FORECAST Mason City Cloudy Wednesday night and Thursday with oc casional rain Wednesday night Cooler Wednesday night with low temperature 3540 Iowa Occasional rain west most ly cloudy with showers and scattered thunderstorms east Wednesday night Thursday clearing and cooler central and east Low Wednesday night 38 42 extreme west and 4550 cen tral and east High Thursday 45 northwest to 58 southeast M i n nesota Clearing northwest portion Wednesday night and except in the extreme southeast portion Thursday Continued cool IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics for 24 hour period ending at 8 oclock Wednesday morning Maximum 60 Minimum 43 At 8 a m Wednesday 44 Precipitation 53 YEAR AGO Maximum 73 Minimum 42 SAME Whltt In no trmfflo duth la IMt M bcu U S STEEL PAY PACT IS SIGNED Pittsburgh contract pro aiding a wage increas for 140000 employes of U S Stee Corporation subsidiaries w a signed Wednesday by representa ives of management and the United Steel Workers Charles R Cox president of th CarnegieIllinois Steel Corpora Jon one of the subsidiaries tol he union men We have a great deal of fait in your leader Union Presiden Philip We have taken a big step her and we are taking it because w have faith ThorntonMohawk Tilt Postponed to Thursday The baseball game between Ma son City and Thornton for Wed nesday afternoon in Mason Cit was called off and will be playe Thursday afternoon at p m weather conditions permitting Citys Price Cut Movement Spreading to Other Communities Ncwburyport Mass ew England grocery chain Wed esday slashed prices 30 per cent nd a halfdozen other commum es prepared to join with this city rolling back prices The Clover Farm in ependentlyowned stores in sachusetts Vermont and New ampshire announced effective mmediately the Price cut on 150 ems Buyers response to a general 0 per cent price cut in Newbury port where the movement orig inated Tuesday sent observers from other cities away enthusias tic about taking similar steps to combat inflation Merchants in Leorninster a central Massachusetts city of 23 000 announced Thursday they would inaugurate a 3day experi ment known as devaluation days with a general 10 per cent cut in prices Ncwburyport stores reported per cent over normal Tuesdays business with automobile acces sories showing the biggest gain Department store sales were up 20 to 25 per cent food 15 to 20 per cent clothing 25 to 30 per cent jewelry and hardware 10 to 15 per cent Norman J Randell executive secretary of the citys develop ment council said that inquiries on details of how the plan worked came from Ansonia Conn and their sales were up from 10 to 46 Brattleboro cities indi AP Wlrtpholo CAMPAIGN TO CUT John M Kelleher extreme talks to storekeepers at an outdoor rally during the campaign in which Newburyport Mass retailers pledged themselves to cut prices a flat 10 per cent Retailers in this seaport city hope their plan will sweep the nation and roll back HAIL DAMAGES CHARLES CITY 2 Nursery Companies Suffer Heavy Loss By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS A variety of storms including wind and hail was reported in Iowa early Wednesday A hail storm its pellets rang ing up to an inch and a half in size caused damage running into thousands of dollars at Charles City Forty to 50 per cent of the glass in the greenhouses at the Sher man Nursery and the Riverside Greenhouse were broken and flowers and plants suffered severe damage The Sherman Nursery estimated its loss in flowers and plants at 515009 and the Riverside com pany estimated its loss would amount to thousands of dollars The business district was litter ed with fragments of glass pelted Expect Tougher Labor Bill As Senators Open Discussion out of neon signs One window in the weather bureaus pent house was shattered and inside the body of a robin was found against the wall At Gilmore City some small buildings were toppled and hail covered the ground resembling a snow storm Electric and tele phonft lines were down in that area There were no reports of casualties Fort Dodge reported large trees were uprooted and branches blown off in many parts of the city Telephone lines were down in Webster county SenateApproved Aid Plan Faces New Attacks in House Washington attack as a blank check the adminis trations foreign relief bill hit the house floor Wednesday less than 24 hours after the senate sealed its approval on an historic 3400000000 program to help Greece and Turkey curb communism Debate on the relief bill first and the sharplypared interior de partment appropriation next probably will delay house action on the GreekTurkish aid program until some time next week The senate passed that measure late Tuesday by the topheavy vote of 67 to 23 after weeks of debate in which opponents assailed it as a step toward war with sia and its supporters claimed it will help preserve peace Although the house sidetracked the question temporarily to con centrate on foreign relief there was abundant evidence that the same issues may determine the legislators final decision on what the United States will do in the way of sending food abroad A final flareup marked the last hours of the senates torrid debate on the GreekTurkish plan of American aid to free peo ples It was touched off by Sen ator Edwin D Johnson author of several unsuccessful amendments to modify the bill with the charge that congress is underwriting a military alliance with Turkey that invites Russian retaliation Obviously Vandenberg irked Chairman of the senate foreign relations commit tee recalled that Johnson also had contended repeatedly that the program can lead only to war with the Soviet Union Terming that statement an in vitation to the precise disaster that this bill seeks to prevent1 Vandenberg continued That is an inflammable state ment and it is a grave error deny there is any such purpose in the heart of any senator who today supports the president the United States Taft Says Measure Does Not Contain Punitive Action Washington The senate plunged into domestic problems Wednesday with Senator Taft R opening debate on a labor disputes bill which even foes con cede may be toughened before its expected fnial approval In the role of a notquitesatis ficd sponsor Taft as chairman of the senate labor committee ar ranged to bring before his col leagues a GOP answer to strikes and labor strife But there was far less evidence of the democratic as well as re publican support by which the senate stamped its 67 to 23 okay Tuesday on a prime foreign policy Trumans propo sal to bolster Greece and Turkey against communism with cash and military assistance Taft insisted in talking mendments which would impos larsher restrictions in unions xiticized the house bill as goin oo far He said the house measure re quires too much detailed regula ion of the internal affairs of un ons One of the amendments Ball in reduced Tuesday would outla ndustry wide strikes It als vould make industrywide bar aining subject to the antitrus aws where monopolistic agrei ments resulted reporters before the senate with met that the committeeapprovel labor measure contains no punitive action despite its proposed curbs on unions and strikes Considerably less far reaching than the house bill which won overwhelming approval last weefc the senate version nevertheless also is objectionableto organized labor The AFL executive council late Tuesday announced plans for 81500000 advertising campaign to fight both measures The council termed them an effort to destroy the power of trade unions Taft said he will resist any mod ifying changes in the senate bill but wants the following additions 1 A flat ban on jurisdictional strikes and secondary boycotts as provided in the house bill The most common type of jur isdictional strike results from a dispute between unions as to which should do certain work A secondary boycott is the refusa by one union to handle products of another 2 The outlawing of unionad ministered health and welfare funds 3 A provision forbidding na tional unions to dictate contract terms to their locals 4 Making it an unfair labor practice for unions to coerce or interfere with workers in the ex ercise of their collective bargain ing rights All of these provisions were knocked out of the bill approved by the senate labor committee Senators Ball Donnel and Jenncr RInd also members of the committee joined Taft in his drive to restore these points Ball sponsor of still 2 more ating they were ready to embark i the same experiment The response from wholesalers i signifying willingness to go long with retailers in cutting rices has been good Randell said Three large suppliers a Lowell osiery firm a candy manufac urer and a mens have ready granted discounts ranging rom 10 to 15 per cent to the stores n all but a few items Hundreds of shoppers from ties and towns adjoining New uryport joined in Tuesdays buy ng spree Randell said but the ig test is expected Thursday and for most in ustrial firms here Merchants of the neighboring own of Amcsbury voted unani mously Tuesday night to adopt the plan after ob ervers reported that the first day f the experiment appeared to be highly successful Portsmouth N H business men who also sent a delegation to Newburyport first ay of the steps o obtain price cut pledges which vould put the program in opera ion in that shipbuilding city Observers from other communi ies including the heavilypopu ated industrial city of Lowell aid they were impressed with the ilan and would make favorable eports to their merchants Under the local program more nan 90 per cent of the retail mcr hants agreed to slash prices 10 per cent in a 10day experiment and were pledged not to buy sup ilies from wholesalers who would not grant similar rcducations much better than on the first day ivas for mens furnishings and au omobile supplies merchants re ported They said that the full ef ects of the experiment would not je known however until the weekend as Tuesday is a nor mally quiet day Government Seeks Phone Negotiations Washington a fresh step toward ending the telephone strike the government Wednesday asked 3 key units of the Bell Telephone system and unions to meet with federal conciliators Invitations to reopen negotia tions were issued to the long lines division of the American Tele phone and Telegraph company the Southwestern Bell Telephone com pany and the Western Electric companys installation and manu facturing departments Conciliation Director Edgar L Warren said the meetings will be arranged as soon as possible Thursday he hoped Joseph A Beirne president of the Rational Federation ol Tele phone Workers which has been on strike 17 days promptly accepted Warrens invitation He expressed hope the conference may form the foundation which would prove the basis for a settlement Warren said he had received no word from the 3 company units which employ approximately 93 000 workers At Omaha union and manage ment representatives met again Wednesday in efforts to end the 17 day old strike of Northwestern Bell Telephone company employes but Union Leader Roy S Ander son said he was not optimistic Representatives of the company and the 5state Northwestern union of telephone workers ar ranged a meeting Tuesday the first since the strike started April reassembled Wednes day SENATE REJECTS BLUES CHOICE Turns Down Watts for Highway Commission Des Moines b the senate on his choice of a nominee Governor Robert D Blue was casting around Wed nesday for an answer on what to do about the highway commission post held by former State Sen ator S Ray Emerson of Cres ion The governor nominated Lee B Watts mayor of Corning to suc ceed Emerson for the 4year term beginningJuly 1 but the senate in executive session refused Tuesday to confirm him l That left it up to Governor Blue to submit another appoint ment although he could ask the senate to reconsider Watte if he chose FAVOR BILL TO HELP HOUSING Senate Banking Group Approves Home Measure Washington senate banking committee approved 7 to 6 Wednesday a longrange hous ing bill designed to encourage con struction of 15000000 homes by 1958 Senator Buck told re porters the committee deadlocked 6 to 6 on the first vote and had to telephone Senator Maybank DS who was on an official visit to the U S naval academy at Annapolis Md to break the tie Maybanfc voted with the majority The senate passed a similar bill during the last session of con gress but the measure was shelved in the house Senators Wagner DN Ellender and Taft sponsored both bills Buck estimated the cost of the program to the federal govern ment at about 37500000000 over a 45year period The bill provides for aiding the private housing industry to make its full contribution toward an economy of maximum employ ment production and purchasing power Company officials declined com ment on the meetings but Ander son said the firm talked about arbitration in many forms as the only solution to the dispute An derson said the union would not go along because the company would not agree to arbitrate all matters The union chief quoted company spokesmen as saying Tuesday night they had no proposal for in creasing basic wages Open Biggest AntiTrust Railroad Case Lincoln Ncbr justice department charged in federal district court Wednesday that a private government is func tioning in the railroad industry to maintain a monopoly in transpor tation Assistant Attorney General Wendell Berge raised this conten tion in opening the biggest rail road antitrust case ever under taken GM Issues Warning to Automobile Dealers Columbus Ohio pres ident of General Motors Corp Tuesday indicated disciplinary action has been and will be taken against dealers who engage in sharp practices to increase the cost of new automobiles to con sumers A newsman asked Charles E Wilson if General Motors had made any attempt to control such practices I think our folks sort of re member he answered If a dealer makes too many moves on the low side I think somebody else might eventually get his franchise AFL Meat Cutters Union to Seek Pay Hike From Larger Packinghouses Chicago cost of liv ing wage increases will be asked of the nations larger packing houses by the 125000 members of the AFLs Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butchers union their spokesmen said Wednesday While the present contract does not expire until Aug 11 1948 it permits either party to propose wage scale changes be tween April 1 and Aug 11 of this year Elect lowan Spokane Wash Jas per of Steamboat Rock Iowa Tuesday was elected vicepresi dent of the National Rural Electric CoOperative association Defendants in the civil action brought in the name of the United States are the Association of American Railroads whose mem bership includes nearly all the principal carriers in the country 47 specifically named railroads operating west of the Mississippi river the Western Association of Railway Executives J P Mor gan and Co and Kuhn Loeb and Co of New York and 8 indi vidual officers of the various cor porations involved The general charge is that the defendants have participated in a broad and continuing combination and conspiracy in violation of the Sherman act BILLTO OUTLAW CLOSED SHOPS GOES TO BLUE Senators Vote Same Proposal as Passed by House on Tuesday BULLETIN DCS Moines a word of debate the Iowa sen ate Wednesday afternoon ap proved and completed legislative action on the anticlosed shop bill as pascsd Tuesday by the house The bill now goes to the governor The senate vote on final passage was 36 to 12 DCS Moines a day and a half of one of the most bit terly contested battles in Iowa legislative history the house representatives voted late Tuesday to ban closed shops The vole was 74 to 31 The measure more restrictive than one previously passed by the senate went to the upper chamber for its consideration of the changes Some house members said they agreed that the senate was strong er for restrictive labor measures than thehouse and that it ap peared certain that the senate would concur in the changes Gov Robert D Blue has been active in behalf of the proposal indi cating he would approve it There were heated arguments many maneuvers by both sides references to personalities charges of a filibuster against the bill and adoption of a rule to limit debate which when proposed un successfully Monday was termed an attempted gag rule The measure as passed by the house retains the bans on the closed shop union shop and checkoff system which were part ot the senate bill passed March 31 by a vote oj 36 to 12 The sub stitute measure however pro vides for injunctions against vio lations of he ban would strength en enforcement and make the bill effective upon enactment to catch labor contracts now being nego tiated After the house went into the 2nd day on the anticlosed shop measure proponents and oppon ents agreed during a recess to clear the decks so that final ac tion could be taken before ad journment for the day The result was that dozens of amendments were withdrawn scores of members waived their previous requests to speak on the bill and the climax came earlier because of the agreement The windup carne after two amendment were defeated and the substitute bill was adopted as an amendment One amendment de feated was by Rep Harold F Nel son RSioux City and it pro Truman Picks Clayton for UN Commission Washington President Truman Wednesday nominated Undersecretary of State William L Clayton to represent the United States on the economic commis sion for Europe The commission was established by the economic and social coun cil of the United Nations Wallace Favors Billion Loan to Russia by World Bank Paris A Wallace said Wednesday that a loan of ap proximately to Russia by the International hank was the only practical step toward world reconstruction and peace He denied in an informal discussion with correspondents that the loan plan had the flavor of appeasement I think the loan should be made conditional on Russia s par ticipation in the world bank the food and agriculture organization and other international groups which so far she has declined to join he said As a further condition he pro posed that Russia be required to drop her demands for reparations from current German production to prevent Germany from be coming a depressed area and fur ther infecting the world Wallace feels that Russia should have first priority for a loan against the which should be made available imme diately through the bank for world sort of world wide new deal He said that he believed the war devastation in Russia would jus tify the International bank in ear marking close to onethird of the for the U S posed banning injunctions in labor disputes The other was by Rep Clifford M Strawman RAna mosaj and it would have confined the bill to a ban on closed shops only In the final arguments oppon ents of the bill conceded defeat although 13 house members ap pealed to their colleagues to vote down the measure and only 7 urged its passage All of the 10 democrats voted against the bill and were joined by 21 republicans from the ma jority party Those who spoke against the bill were Reps Carroll L Brown R Rose Amy M Bloom H Dayton one of the 2 women members of the house Allert G Olson John L Duffy J E Hansen R Edna C Lawrence R Ottumwa the other woman house member Norman Norland D Arnold Utzig DDubu Strawman Andrew J Niel sen RCouncil Hugh W Lundy Ted Sloane R Des and William S Beardsley RNew Speaking for the measure were Reps Harry E Weichman R M F Hicklin R Walter F Noble R Missouri William S Lynes W R Fim men George B Kester and Burk man Those who voted against the bill were Reps Beardsley Dents Bloom Carroll Brown Duffy Fiene Gra ham Hansen Hcdin Krall Kruse Lawrence Long Loss Lundy Neal Harold F Nelson Nielson Norland Olson Poston Prange Robb Schwengel Scott Sloane Steinberg Strawman Utzig Van Eaton and H W Walter Those absent or not recorded as voting were Reps De Groote McEleney and Kuester All others voted for the bill Britain he said should receive Greece of course should re ceive a share sufficient to restore her shattered economy as should other nations blasted by war Glassmaking was the first in dustry established in colonial America Early glassmakers brought their secrets with them from Europe   

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