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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: December 4, 1946 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - December 4, 1946, Mason City, Iowa                                ill NORTH IOWAS DAILYPAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME t t I HISTORY AN9 ARCHIVES KftlNCS I A THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS VOL urn Associated Pica tnd United Press Full Leased Wires Five Cents a Copy MASON CITY IOWA WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 4 1946 Thr Paper Consists ol Two SectloMSectlon No 47 UMW IS FINED Reds Agree to Drop Arms Control Veto Lake Success N Y Russia made a major switch of policy Wednesday to abandon her veto of disarmament enforcement and the United Nations in a new spirit of optimism named a subcommittee to write a resolution calling for the reduction of armaments and pro hibition of atomic warfare Soviet Foreign Minister V M Molotov announced the new Rus sian policy apparently after receiving fresh instructions from Moscow the 54nation political and security committee which had been deadlocked for a week on the disarmament issue After Molotpvs speech it appeared that the resolution would in clude the primary condition that no nation should have the right to dodge inspection or control or disarmament by casting a veto vote in the security council The 20 nations named to the subcommittee were the U S Russia the United Kingdom China France Norway Nether lands Poland Canada India Czechoslovakia Mexico Egypt Brazil Australia Colombia Bel gium Syria Argentine and the Ukraine Oakland Gal US Clamps Embargo on Rail Freight SLASH ORDERED FOR PASSENGER Molotov made clear that Rus sia was not giving up its veto power over discussions of disarm ament but said flatly that once all had agreed on a plan and it had been put into effect the veto has no relevance Apparent soviet reluctance to abandon the veto over execution and implementation of any arms reduction program had until Mol otov spoke apparently deadlocked the powers It was believed that Molotov acted after receiving new instruc tions from Generalissimo Josef Stalin in Moscow He had delayed Put in State of Emergency Oakland Cal the face of a general strike that tied up the city the Oakland city council Wednesday declared a state of emergency and placed full police and fire power in the hands of the mayor There were indications that Mayor Herbert L Beach was con templating a get tough program He declared late Tuesday 32 hours after an AFL walkout had paralyzed the metropolitan area of a million persons that the city of Oakland is not going back to the jungle He asked the city council to take Wednesdays emer gency action because no cdm his statement several days apmunity can exist in anarchy parently awaiting word from the i Kremlin The crowded committee room was tense as Molotov took the microphone to give Russias an swer to AngloAmerican insist ence that there could be no veto over the enforcement of disarm ament Molotovs personal inter preter Vladimir Pavlov delivered the translation in smoothlyflow ing English on the simultaneous interpretation system so there would be no mistaking Molotovs words Molotov said that the American disarmament plan submitted to the committee Saturday by Sen Tom Connally D Tex was worthy of particular attention He said that the U S proposal was not sufficiently clear and onesided but that Russia would submit amendments because we are anxious to achieve unanimity We are preparing not to in sist on our own draft resolution Molotov said And we are willing to take the U S draft as the basis for further discussion CLARION MAN IS DISTRICT JUDGE Special Election Called for State Senator Post Des Moines of State Sen G H Hill RClar ion to succeed the late District Judge Dean W Reisen of Eldora was announced Wednesday by Cov Robert D Blue The governor simultaneously issued a proclamation calling for a special election to fill the va cancy caused by the resignation of Hill from the state senate effec tive Tuesday The election will be Jan 6 in Hamilton Hardin and Wright counties which comprise as the 37th senatorial district Judge Peisen died unexpected last week at the home of a son S near New Providence The judge was reelected in the Nov 5 gen sral election for a 4 year term The judicial appointment how ipver will be for only 2 years or J jntil the 1948 general election The special senatorial election will H iu the vacancy for the full 4year erm to which Hill was elected ast month The ordinarily simple problems of existence were becoming in creasingly critical There was lit tle food to be bought No gas signs were blossoming on filling station pumps Public transporta tion was at a complete halt Auto mobile traffic crept along over taxed highway arteries Milk was becoming scarce There were no newspapers The transportation paralysis re duced attendance at schools and the University of California in Berkeley Demands emphasized by AFL labor spokesmen in radio appeals press statements and at the mass meeting were 2 department store man agements must agree immediately to negotiate employes of the 2 stores must be guaranteed a re turn to their old jobs officials must pledge not to use police inbreaking picket lines truck drivers used in Sundays incident must be sent back to Los Angeles TRAIN SERVICE Postoffice Restricts Size and Weight of Parcel Post Packages Washington government order holding railroad freight to the most vital needs struck a stag gering new blow Wednesday to industries struggling to maintain operations despite the coal strike Widespread factory shutdowns with consequent unemployment for thousands now working ap peared in prospect Officials explained that the or der and a companion restriction on parcel post are designed to as sure that coalburning locomotives can be kept running on reduced schedules until midFebruary They did not predict a coal strike lasting that long but said the fuelsaving measures are pre cautionary in event no more coal is mined before then The measures hit both home and factory They 1 Clamped an embargo on all rail freight and express shipments with the exception of commodities and supplies necessary to the maintenance of public health and safety effective a m Fri day 2 Ordered a second 25 per cent cut in rail passenger mileage ef fective pm Sunday 9 Limited the post to 5 pounds in packages meas uring not more than 18 inches in length and 60 inches in girth com bined effective a hi Fri day 4 Subjected all export ship ments except bulk grain live stock and exports for the armed services to shipment under special permit effective Tuesday mid night Officials of the office of defense transportation estimated the em bargo action would reduce freight and express shioments 50 per cent ODT Director J Monroe John son explaining that his reports in dicate that the railroads have only EMBARGO TO HIT FIRMS DWINDLING COAL PILEThen and now pictme shows the gas and electric companys reserve coal pile 46000 tons on Nov 19 in Baltimore Md as the coal shutdown started Lower photo shows how that pile looks today Notice men in foreground for size comparison CITY Coal Tieup to Affect Lehigh Cement Plant Badly If Continued Mason Citys major industries will be affected in various degrees by the coal strike and new rail embargo which goes into effect Friday Because inventories are low in the clay and cement industries these plants will attempt to con tinue operating as long as possible in face of reduced shipments Natural gas is used in the kilns of the Mason City Brick and Tile company so manufacturing need not be curtailed in that industry The company expects to make de liveries by truck in the Mason City area but will be seriously affected in its quota commitments in gen eral It expects to build up inven tories The Northwestern Slates Port land Cement company headed by Gen Hanford MacNider has suf ficient fuel on hand to continue operations for some time to build up inventories It normally ships little cement this time of the year but this fall has continued abnor mally heavy shipments to fill a big demand The Mason City plant of the Le high Portland Cement company will be seriously affected in event the strike continues because oi the shortage of fuel The company has a large backlog of orders and would have built up its inventories 5 Fine Is Placed on Lewis BULLETIN Washington United Mine Workers was fined and John L Lewis personally 310000 Wednesday for contempt of court in the coal strike but Lewis escaped a jail term Washington government Wednesday asked fines totaling against the United Mine Workers and substantial punishment for their leader John L Lewis Jailing of Lewis was not asked however Lewis faced Federal District Judge T Alan Goldsborough as government attorneys outlined recommendations for pun ishment for contempt of court Union Counsel Joseph A Padway protested the proposed 000 line as cruel and unusual punishment against the UMW members uwas caculated by the government on the basis of for each ot the 14 days the miners have stayed away from the ted REPORT WYATT TO QUIT POST Housing Head Wont Accept Compromises Washington Ex pediter Wilson Wyatts reported decision to quit signalled the end Wednesday of some bitter feuds within the administration but left unsettled many questions of the housing programs future Friends said Wyatt decided to step out rather than accept a com promise in his demands for fuller authority to push the program along the lines he declares are necessary His resignation has not been announced officially but an official in close touch with the white house said it probably would would be by Thursday The housing chief conferred with President Truman Friday a 27day coal supply on hand at the present rate of consumption asserted that My deadline for taking further action was set at 26 days We are too close to that to postpone ac tion any further Industry and the public will be hard hit by the re strictions but we cannot further continue to gamble with the coal stocks on hand We have an entire nation to feed Excepted from the freight em bargo are food livestock and poultry feed livestock and poul try dry and liquid fuels 6 ernes drugs surgical instruments and and dressings newspapers maga zines newsprint printing ink wa ter purification chemicals insec ticides and fungicides ice drink ing water and a number of other supplies considered necessary for the public health and safety Likewise the following 4 classes of goods are not affected by the parcel post limitations Live day old poultry seeds plants and oth er nursery stock eggs butter and other perishable foods and medi cines drugs surgical instruments and surgical dressings Unveil Secret Report of GI Misconduct in Germany Zone Meaders Probe Claims Sexual Immorality and Racketeering by Yanks Washington UR Republican members of the senate war in vestigating committee Wednesday published a secret report by com mittee counsel containing charges by racket eering smuggling and sexual Im morality among American officers and troops stationed in Germany The reportpublished over state and war department protests described the conduct of some sol diers as little short of disgrace ful related instances of Negro troops fraternizing with German girls and charged that a recent group of occupation troops sent to Germany included men who were not even highgrade mor People should keep culling non laying and unprofitable hens all the just once or twice a year experts from the North Dakota agriculture college say Loafers waste feed and cut down poultry returns It said one high officer was re turned to the United States for reasons of moral turpitude It also reported previously secret testimony alleging that a colonel stationed in Frankfurt was a white slaver The report charged that im proper conduct of high military government officials has lowered troop morale harmed U S pres tige and delayed achievement of U S occupation objectives The report was submitted to the committee by its chief counsel George Meader after he made a preliminary onthespot investi gation His inquiry was prompted by testimony before the commit tee last Aug 14 by Col Francis P Miller former military gov ernment official Miller charged that the conduct of Negro troops was one of the most disgraceful episodes in American history In an effort to offset the charges released by the republican mem bers Committee Chairman Har ley M Kilgore D W Va late Tuesday made public an official army report It denied most of the charges asserted Miller sought after his August testimony to change some of his statements but that Meader refused to accept those changes and said many of Millers state ments were such as to raise ques tions regarding his integrity as an officer Meader charged in his report to he committee as released by the republicans that persons who stand to profit directly or indi rectly have been placed in charge of economic phases of the occupa ion He also quoted a highranking military government official that t was his considered judgment hat the German troops occupying France had a better record in their ersonal contact with the popula ion than the American troops occupying Germany The largest natural lake in Texas Caddo lake on the Louis ana border is 20 miles long Old say it was created by an earthquake At1 CharlesCrtjvlhe Oliver cor poration plant employing ap proximately 1700 persons an nounced Wednesday it would cease operations Saturday due to the coal strike and the general freight embargo The plant is engaged in making tractors At Decorah the coal strike and consequent bog down of train service caused a temporary shut down of the Midland Manufactur ing company M K Widdekind general manager reported a 10 day supply of vital parts is tied up at Chicago and steel for chassis fabrication is similarly affected Throughout Iowa industrial leaders studied the governments freight embargo orders and dwindling coal supplies Wednes day in an effort to maintain their production as long as possible The GraIron foundry at Mar shalltown employing 80 workers was one of the first in the state to feel the pinch The firm an nounced it will close Saturday be cause of a pig iron shortage brought on by the coal shipping situation Ottumwa industrialists estimat ed 2 weeks will elapse before the effect of the freight embargo is seriously felt No estimate was available of the numbers of work ers who might be let out when the pinch comes At Centerville the Batavia Met al Products company estimated it would have to close in about 10 days affecting some 200 persons because of a shortage of pig iron and coke Martin Manufacturing company also a metal working firm has been closed by a strike of its own At Fort Dodge industrialists hoped to press trucks into service for deliveries and said they would continue working as long as pos sible Clay plants will store sur plus stocks in yards Gypsum in dustries are hoping most of their production can be shipped by electric lines and transferred to roads using Diesel operated freight trains Auto Industry Sees Stoppage by Next Week Pittsburgh of th 2weekod coal stoppage cu deeper into the life of the natio Wednesday as a fuel saving em bargo on railroad freight ship ments heralded unemployment to tals that may reach depression year levels In the midst of one of the mos prosperous periods in the nation history more than 165000 person addition to 400000 AFL United Mine idl and by Friday the number ma be over 2000000 Simultaneously with the freigh had operating conditions permitj embargo set for a m Fri day the countrys automobile in dustry will come to a virtual hal Ford Motor company prediete a complete shutdown within a few days after the embargo become effective throwing 85000 person out of work General Motors speaking blunt 1V declared We cant operate i we cant ship the materials am the finished products Genera Motors employs 200000 A prediction was made by secretary of the Commerce and Industry association in New York City that the railroad embargo would bring almost paralysis and isolation tries in the nations largest city idling a high percentage of New Yorks 2500000 workers In the midwest the Chicago As sociation of Commerce declared the embargo would result in grad ual closing of more than 10000 industrial plants in the Chicago area Housing one of the mostpress postwar problems is dealt a se vere setback by the embargo The West Coast Lumbermens associa tion said the Pacific northwests 1300 sawmills that produce 125 000000 board feet of desperately needed lumber a week will begin closing down at once because they have no storage space Meanwhile in Uniontown Pa a grizzled mine veteran summed up miners reaction to word that John L Lewis and the United Mine Workers had been found guilty of contempt of court We dont give a damn what they do in Washington he growled Well stay out until Lewis tells us to go back The Pennsylvania bureau of un employment compensation ruled Tuesday that the states 100000 idle soft coal miners are ineligible for jobless pay benefits afternoon for the 2nd time within a week seeking a decision on his recommendations for future con duct of the housing program Aft erward a white house announce ment said that there would be no statement and that the matter was still being worked on Truman Names Denny Chairman for FCC Washington President Truman Wednesday appointed Charles R Denny Jr of Balti more Md to be chairman of the federal communications commis sion Denny has been acting chair I man of the FCC since Paul A Porter left that post to be OPA 1 administrator North lowans Take Share of Ribbons at International Show By THOR JENSEN GlobeGazette Farm Editor Chicago Shorthorn breeders who have been inclined to look down their noses at the allwhite animals will have to make a quick change of tune because the cham pion of all shorthorns is a snow white bull from the Sniabar farms Grain Valley Mo Tuesday was a real day for shorthorn breeders anyway be cause the breed took both the grand championship and the re serve championship in the fat steer class at the International Sorth lowans showed their share Clausen Brothers of Spencer took a lions share of the ribbons with Ben J Studer of Wesley and loe Duea of Beltnond also well up in the running Among several other honors Duea copped 3rd in the 700900 pound class on Tomahawk II suc cessor to the grand champion Tomahawk which he fed and showed last year for Carl Henkel of Mason City One of the sur prises of the day was another Duea entry believe it or not in the Angus entry took fat stock show His 18th in the 9001050 class One would have expected Duea to be a confirmed shorthorn showman after his success of last year The strawberry roan steer from Oklahoma A M which replaced Tomahawk as king of all fat steers moved into the top ring by beat ing an Iowa steer shown by Phyl lis Bonnater 15 of Keswick Everyone in the huge crowd which Packed the amphitheater seemed to be pulling for the girl but that 2Vidently made no difference to the thin faced Scotchman Walter Biggar who did the judging Tuesdays crowd was the larg est the amphitheater has ever ac commodated and the spectators really saw a lot of meat on the hoof K C Pollock head of the shows meat division estimated that there were 556600 steaks 143040 pork chops and 152000 lamb chops parading around While Chicago is dressed up in a daytime Christmas costume the city is a sad sight at night with the few lights permitted because of the brownout The loop which usually is a blaze of neon and in candescent lights just doesnt show up at all after dark Strangest sight of all is the the ater marquee which usually is a solid mass of light bulbs below a neon sign several floors in height Now there is one lonely bulb hanging under the marquee in front of 1h tirct office For the benefit of city house wives who have been having trouble finding shortening lately I took an extra look at the lard exhibit at the International am phitheater Tuesday It is in the form of a huge sow 400 pound size nursing an even dozen pigs The whole thing is made out of beautiful while lard But lest we start feeling sorry for ourselves because of meat shortages the next display case was a comparison of the weekly rations of Australians Chinese and Indians Australians by the way eat better than we do and have a life expectancy of 65 years as compared with our 64 As for the Chinese and Indians they can expect to live about a 3rd as long on their weekly ra tions which it seems to me I could eat in one day The Netherlands Indies island of Bangka provided threefifths of the Indies tin output before World War II Weather Report FORECAST Mason City Generally fair and continued mild Wednesday night and Thursday Low Wednesday night 30 to 35 Iowa Generally fair and mild Wednesday night and Thursday Low Wednesday night 30 to 35 High Thursday 50 to 65 Minnesota Mostly cloudy Wednes day night and Thursday with a few snow flurries north Some colder north Wednesday and entire state Thurs what night day IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics for 24 hour period ending at 8 oclock Wednesday morning Maximum 46 Minimum 23 At 8 a m Wednesday 31 YEAR AGO Maximum 24 Minimum 13 despite Goldsboroughs re straining order designed to avert a walkout John F Sonnett the govern ment attorney made his recom mendation after Judge Golds borough asked both sides for their views as to sentence Sonnett said the government believed that the union has sub stantial financial resources and that appropriate punishment would be a fine of Sonnett made no recommenda tion for a jail sentence for Lewis the only individual defendant Welly K Hopkins union law yer then said We would have no views to express except in the light of the views that first might be ex pressed by the government Secretary Treasurer Thomas Kennedy reported the unions treasury consisted of at ine recent UMW convention Imprisonment of the union lead er would accomplishnothing in the opinion of the federal coa mines administration Sonnett told the court Sonnett also renewed the gov ernments plea for a temporary injunction to replace the restrain ing order now outstanding against Lewis and UMW The original order dated Nov 18 was designed to head off the soft coal strike but Lewis ignored it Goldsborough asked Sonnett whether the government did not complete want a permanent injunction to indus Sonnett said such a request might be made later but a tem orary injunction would suffice at this time he believed Sonnett told the court Your honor will recollect that 14 full days have run between P m on Nov 18 1946 when these defendants were served with the ourts restraining order and the late of their conviction Thus the ine considered on a daily basis vould average 5250000 a day With respect to the individual defendant John L Lewis it is ecommended that this court im ose a substantial punishment laving in mind the public interest reviously mentioned It is difficult to advise your onor as to what in fact would onstitute an appropriate punish ment for this defendant In considering the recommen ation which the government lould make to this court con erning the sentence to be im osed on the defendant Lewis we ave of course consulted with ie coal mines administration is in charge of the mines The view of the coal mines ad ministration in which we concur that this time a jail sen ence for the individual defendant an accomplish nothing toward restoration of coal production and might to the contrary place a further obstacle on that objective The sentencing was scheduled originally for 10 a m but for 2 hours the legal aides conferred be hind closed doors sometimes to gether and sometimes separately Then Goldsborough convened his court at noon only to have the bailiff announce a3hour recess There was a gasp of surprise from the tense spectators at this word Goldsborough smiled broadly as he left the courtroom One justice department official told newsmen the delay was asked by Joseph A Padway AFL coun sel and chief Lewis attorney A justice department attorney who sat on the government bench in the court room but did not par ticipate in the talks in chambers suggested to reporters that an llth hour effort to end the walkout might be in progress He added however that he had no specific knowledge this was the case A Tree Grows in Pcoria Pcoria HI has a sapling atop its city hall that is growing fast Now 2yearsold it is vigorously sprouting in a crev ice of the buildings stone mason ry   

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