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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: December 3, 1946 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - December 3, 1946, Mason City, Iowa                                NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME AS6 ArtCU I U THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH 10WANS NEIGHBORS VOLUn Associated United Press Full Leased Wires five Cents a Copy MASON CITY IOWA TUESDAY DECEMBER 3 1946 This Paper Consists of Two SectlonsiSecUon One No 46 JUDGE RULES LEWIS GUILTY IOWA GIRL 15 VIES FOR HIGH STEER HONORS Joe Duea of Belmond Ben Studer of Wesley Win Honors in Show Chicago was the big day for cattle and swine ex hibitors at the 47th International Livestock Exposition Youth in the person of blush ing red haired Phyllis Bonnater 15 of Keswick Iowa was pitted against the experience and skill of her adult competitors in a con test for one of the nations most coveted farm honors the title of grand champion steer of the ex position Phyllis whose 1260 pound Hereford steer A C won the junior championship of the show Saturday carried with her the hopes of her fellow 4H club mem bers who have won the grand championship 8 times since 1928 Purdue university of Lafayette Ind won the grand championship at the 1941 show the last prewar international breaking a 3year string of steer victories by boy and girl showmen North lowans won honors Tues day at the exposition In breeding Shorthorns junior yearling heif ers Clausen brothers of Spencer won first and 3rd In fat Short horns steers 700 to 900 pounds Toe Duea of Belmond won 3rd place Duea also took 2nd in the Shorthorn cattle junior heifer calf and Clausen brothers took 3rd in the senior heifer calf class Ben G Studer Wesley placed2nd in the breeding Shorthorns junior bull calf class Representing the nations farm youth in the swine competition was 19 year old William Worth ington of Pontiac 111 whose 22 pound Hampshire barrow Mike won the junior grand champion ship Saturday Top prize winners of the show will be sold at auction Thursday along with lesser winners Purdue universitys grand champion lowan and 3 Children Die in Home Fire Burlington Harris Staf ford 32 and his 3 children suffo cated early Tuesday as the father made a vain attempt to rescue the youngsters from a fire which swept the building in which they resided and in which he operated a The dead children were Larry 11 Gene 3 and Marjorie Mrs Ann Stafford the childrensstep mother was injured seriously when she leaped from a 2nd floor window before firemen could raise a ladder to rescue her I Stafford who came here about 2 months ago from Chicago owned the Stafford Feather Processing Co which he also operated in the Illinois city It occupied the base ment of the 2story brick residence and the family lived on the 1st and 2nd floors Mrs Ruth Hildebrand a neigh bor said she told Stafford of the fire and he rushed to the 2nd floor to save the children The base ment and 1st floor were burned out but the 2nd floor suffered little damage Mrs Stafford suffered 1st and 2nd degree burns on the neck and back cuts on the head an injured ankle and shock The fire was discovered about 1 a m Stafford formerly lived at Aibia Loyal Alumnus sold for a pound at the 1941 show bringing a total of to the university Dwight Tahkes Aberdeen An gus steer Tuesday was in line to try for the championship of the Aberdeen Angus breed Tabke 17 year old Moville Iowa lad showed the steer to the reserve grand championship of the junior con test then forged ahead Monday in the open classes when the An gus won against the adults in his animals weight class Eugene Montgomery of Oska loosa Iowa won the reserve junior championship in the corn prince contest showing a yellow dent Krisor Kl type The corn judging was part of the junior di vision grain show 0 S IS AGAINST FRANCO ACTION Wants Spanish People to Kick Out Dictator Lake Success N Y The United States Tuesday opposed diplomatic or economic sanctions against the Franco government of Spain but again asked the United Nations to call on the Spanish l people to oust the dictator and set up their own democratic govern ment Sen Tom Conrially D Tex fs lold the ON political and security 1 committee that a break in diplo ma tic or economic relations with f I he Franco government would f precipitate the Spanish people into the disatser of civil war Connally spoke on behalf of a yjU S resolution presented to the committee Monday calling for Franco to give up his dictatorship and for the Spanish people to es jtablish a broadly representative if provisional government The Texas senator said that a ifiPolish proposal to break diplo iiimatic relations and a byelorussian to cut also all trade with Spain were inher pritly defective and would not n lead to the realization of the com j pon objective iiptatue of Justice Hides JVhisky for 56 Years 5 Stockton Cal UR When iiorkmen dismantled a statue of i vstice from the county courthouse it had perched undisturbed ij 56 years they found the robes fi1 justice had hidden 3 quart bot of whisky now 63 years nlri Mass Strike Cripples City in California Cal general upOaklaiici Tuesday as AFL trade unions obeyed an order to pull out everything in Oak land Transportation except for a mass of private automobiles was stilled Normal operation of industry in the area of 1000000 persons halted Newspapers ceased publi cation are 120 000 of stayed at home or found themselves caught in the slow tide of private cars The strike effective at 5 a m 7 a m CST was a retaliatory move by AFL unions to Sundays action of police in escorting non union trucks laden with merchan dise to 2 picketed department stores in downtown Oakland The unions insisted the truck drivers were strikebreakers Charles W president of the AFL California Federation of Labor and head of the Bay District Council of Teamsters was said by union sources here to have given the signal for the strike He was in Washington D C on a business trip Apprised of Sundays events his reply was quoted Pull out everything in Oakland Schools remained open and Su perintendent W R OdelT said un ion maintenance employes would be on the job Some drug stores closed but the AFL Teamsters union directing strike strategy said it had ar ranged that certain registerec pharmacists remain on the job UNVEIL BRITISH U S MERGER IN GERMAN ZONES Byrnes to Ask Big 4 Ministers to Discuss Austria Peace Plans New York o State Byrnes jointly announcing with Foreign Minister Bevin a BritishAmerican economic mer ger in Germany declared TUBS day that he would ask the Big 4 foreign ministers to discuss peace plans for Austria as well as Ger many before ending their Nev York sessions Byrnes and Bevin said in a statement that the zone economic merger would become effectivi Tan 1 that it should make 40 000QOO Germans selfsufficient ii 3 years and that they hoped i would lead to discussions with Russia and France for the eco nomic unification of all Germany Byrnes discussed the radica new agreement which diplomat consider the most important de velopment in allied policy on Germany since the occupation started at a news conference I was his first meeting with report ers since the foreign ministers council opened here a month ago He made these major dis closures 1 The foreign ministers council in his opinion may wind up thi week the peace treaties for Italy Romania Bulgaria Hungary anc Finland and proceed at once to a discussion of the German ques tion On Germany Byrnesintends to insist as he had previously said he would on a discussion of Germanys western frontiers chiefly whether France should ge the Saar and have the Ruhr inter nationalized Diplomatic authorities that since French PresidentPre mier Georges Bidault is not at tending the New York 4power meeting France would oppose any such important talks on Germany here and the Big Four probably wilt agree to delay the boundary 3 The United States will ask that the Austrian question be taken up here The main issue diplomatic informants said whether an arrangement can be made for the early withdrawal of Russian and other allied troops from Austria 4 Byrnes is adhering strictly to his to what the Russians the allied powers should not take any Ger man reparations from current German production The Russians are known to want an agreement by which they might collect rep arations for many years to come 5 The probable FourPower talks Weather Report FORECAST Mason City Fair Tuesday nighl and Wednesday No decidec change in temperatures Lows Tuesday night 3530 Iowa Fair Tuesday and Wednes day Slowly rising temperatures Lows Tuesday 25 northwest to 30 southeast High Wednesday 4550 Iowas 5Day mean temperature will average 2 to 4 degrees normal above normal 29 State Rather mild Wednesday Much colder Thursday Rising trend Friday and Saturday Colder again Saturday night and Sunday Precipitation will average less than onetenth inch Occa sional light snow Thursday and again Saturday night or Sun day Minnesota Generally fair Tues day night A little colder north and central Wednesday partly cloudy with temperature little change in IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics or 24 hour period ending at 8 Tuesday morning Maximum 28 Minimum 21 At 8 a m Tuesday 21 fEAR AGO Maximum 34 Minimum 22 result of the on Germany here will be the appointment of a commission of deputies to do the spade work for a foreign minis ters meeting in Europe early next year Byrnes will favor hearings on the German question for Bel gium the Netherlands Czechoslo vakia Poland and Luxembourg all of which have asked to be heard but it is uncertain whether any of them will be allowed ac tually to participate in the Ger man discussions Find Vein of Coal While Digging Sewer Topeka Kans fuel sit uation in coalshorted Topeka was looking up Tuesday City depart ment employes digging a sewer under a street struck a 20inch vein 14 feet under ground While city fathers pondered the technicalities of municipal mining workers used the coal to keep warm in ditchside fires BROADCAST LESSONS AS COAL CRISIS CLOSES Denver Colo schools pupils gather around a radio in a private building to hear their lessons broadcast by Mrs Ruth Evans left one of the Denver teachers conducting the 5 houraday program Denver residents got set Tuesday to burn every thing but the parlor piano when the last lump of coal goes up in smoke Coil yards in the city of 400 000 were empty The job of keep ing warm was becoming an every man for himself proposi tion In what appeared to be the most severe local coal shortage in the nation Denverites by the thousands were using makeshift heating methods The kitchen stove became the family hearth The axe was sharp ened for use on the old oak tree in the back yard From dawn to dusk automobiles loaded heavily with logs fence Minneapolis Teachers Call Educators Accept Wage Hike Offer St Paul Walkout Continues Minneapolis ff Minneapolis leachers Monday night accepted a settlement giving them an ulti mate yearly salary raise off a threatened strike The settlement reached by a committee which negotiated with he school board was unanimous ly approved hy locals 238 and 59 of the American Federation of Teachers AFL Charles E Boyer president of the mens unit an nounced and Willard Goslin superintendent of schools said it would be formally ratified at a oard meeting Dec 10 Instead of the current 3000 annual salary range the stipulation provided A S150 cost of living bonus to e paid this month A flat increase for all reg ular classroom instructors in 1947 Effective Jan 1 1947 salaries from 52000 to for teachers with bachelors degrees 4400 for masters degrees 400S4GOO for doctors degrees and 5240053800 for degreeless nstructors On that date Goslin aid all teachers will be reclassi ied with annual increases being igured on a basis of so that nstructors are enabled to reach heir jnarimums in 12 years Goslin estimated these changes vould effect a overall ncrease in the annual school mdgets In St Paul where the teachers trike entered its 2nd week Mon lay councilmen submitted pro osals for changes in the city barter they estimated would aise an added yearly Tie changes submitted to the barter commission by letter must e voted on To enable schools which were till being picketed to reopen the t Paul Ministers association epresenting Protestant churches uggested Monday that the strik rs sign a 60day truce pending le balloting a proposal on which eachers leaders had not yet com mented ESCAPES EARLY MORNING FIRE Nellie Finh Litzel Awakened by Smoke Clear Nellie Finch Litzel escaped from her burning cottage in her nightclothes when fire gutted the home about 3 oclock Tuesday morning She was awakenedofrom sleep by the choking smoke and found the room in flames She first tried the window then dashed for the door and went to the Ralph Finch home near by for help The fire company responded and kept the fire from spreading but all of Mrs Litzels personal property was destroyed The fire is believed to have started from an overheated stove pipe which passed through a parti tion in the 3room structure ac cording to firemen Mrs Litzel had insurance on her personal proprety The house is the property of Mrs Lottie Kurd Marsh who could not be reached Tuesday in regard to insurance or plans for rebuilding Record Yield Harlan what is reported as a state record and possibly a national record Glen Babbitt Corley farmer produced corn yielding 183 bushels an acre on a 16acre test plot this year Babbitts achievement was an nounced at a county corn test banquet Monday night and Iowa State college officials were quoted as saying Babbitts yield was the highest of which they had record DEER NEAR VILHSCA Passengers in a bus nearVillisca nad their journey halted momen tarily recently when a big buck deer crossed the road Unafraid the deer made such a leisurely crossing that the bus had to stop posts and combustible debris streamed into Denver fromout lying rural areas A dead tree was bonanza fbr the family man who could wield an ax The last of the coal in retail yards was sold last weekend Gor don Callbeck president of the Denver Coal Merchants associa tion said full scale disaster was on the way for Denver and woulc strike by the end of the week unless drastic steps were taken Faced with a dropping ther mometer in thelrtring room many families set kftcKen Gas stoves on ful blast and oven doors opened while families huddled around to keep warm More than 2000 people in one Denver housing project have been struggling with the cold since lasi Saturday night when the central heating unit for the 475 apart ments ran out of coal The only source of heat in most of the apartments was gas stoves Parents especially were con cerned about the health of their children exposed to low tempera tures day and night In rural areas around Denver many farmers were cutting down the windbreaks which were planted in the 30s to protect crops from the prairie gales Only the high price of grain was keeping them from burning wheat and other grains to keep farmhouses LAKE TEACHERS GET WAGE HIKE Clear increase of month to meet higher living costs was granted Clear Lake school teachers ata special ses sion of the board of education Monday evening Roscoe Miller president of the joard said the wage boost will in clude all teachers and is effective as of Dec 1 Prize Porkers Wrapped in Blankets at International Show I By THOR JENSEN GlobeGazette Farm Editor in blankets used to mean some kind of baked meat ciish bat here at the International Livestock show in Chicago it means just what it says We saw thousands of pigs sheep horses and cattle Monday and it seemed as if all of them were kept under wraps until just before they went into the ring And even though here were thousands of animals lere they represent literally mil lons of head from 45 states and 4 Canadian provinces They arc really the cream after culling at county district and contests and it is a real thrill to see the animals parade into the huge International amphitheater The cattle are the center of attrac tion for blocks of beef waddling on legs set at each corner The amphitheater is a 4 ring circus with fences dividing it into quarters and judging of cattle and horses going on simultaneously in each quarter At the same time judging of hogs and sheep is going on in special rings on the 2nd floor This huge building covers approximately a square block It is 3 stories high and all the thousands of people and animals are packed under one roof Howard Tellier 18 year old Humboldt 4H champ who is here for a week as the guest of radio station KGLO joined me Monday night for tjie annual Thomas E Wilson dinner one of the high lights of the 4H victory congress Henry Ford n was the principal speaker and sports champions paid tribute to 4H champions They included Bob Feller who was a 4Her and said he pitched hay until pitching ball became more profitable Patty Berg the Agse boys of the champion Illinois foot ball team Pauline Beta Sid Luck man Mary Hardwick and others Ford told the youngsters that they should be thankful to Amer ica not oilv for its high stanrd ard of living but also for the op portunities it offers The competi tive drive of the American system is well stated in the 4H motto to make the best better he declared industry he continued might well accept the 4 symbols of the youth organization Head heart hands and health Thomas E Wilson who helped to organize the first 4H congress in 1922 and gave his first annual dinnerfor 11 4Hers in 1918 was host to more than 1300 in the huge banquet room of the Stevens hotel before the annual 4H parade Monday evening in 1he amphithe ater which was packed to honor the leaders youth of Americas farm Defers Sentence Until Wednesday Washington L Lewis and his United Mine Workers were held guilty of contempt of court Tuesday for disregarding an order designed to avert the industry shattering soft coal strike Federal Judge T Alan Goldsborough who handed down the historic verdict after 5 days of court proceedings deferred sentence until Wednesday The penalties in fines or jail sentences are within the discretion of the court The law sets no maxima or minima in con tempt cases Opposing attorneys were directed by Judge Goldsborough to submit their recommendations Wednesday at 9 a m The overnight agreement was announced after Lewis making his first public utterance since before the 13dayold strike had spoken against this ugly recrudcu Burke Ousted by Southern Mine Owners Washington UR Edward R Burke who proposed last week that private mine owners resume negotiations with John L Lewis was forced out Tuesday as presi dent of the Southern Coal Pro ducers association The association in effect repu diating Burkcs stand said in ac cepting his resignation that the question of negotiating with the Dinted Mine Workers AFL wil become an appropriate one when operation of the mines is re sumed When that situation exists i said we will make every effort to arrive at a proper working agreement with the United Mine Workers of America The association acted at a di rectors meeting here No reason wasgiven for Burkes resignation But it obviously stemmed from the former Nebraska senators Thanksgiving day statement that he favored resuming negotiations with Lewis if the mine union chiej called a 2week truce in the cur rent strike E S SELBY FORMER MAYOR HERE SUCCUMBS E S Selby Dies at Home in California E S Selby former treasurer of Jacob E Decker and Sons and lirst mayor of Mason City under he city manager form of govern ment died early Tuesday morning at his home in La Jolla Cal of heart disease He is survived by his wife a daughter Mrs Jeanette Parkin and 3 sons Edward H Peter and lornmdr Gordon Selby Funeral services will be held Wednesday at LaJoila with burial n the Cypress Memorial ceme ery at San Diego Mr Selby retired from the Decker company position in 1937 t which time he and his family moved to California He had been a resident of Mason City since 920 coming here from Austin vhere he was a part o the Hormel acking company 14 years He was prominent in civic af airs here having served as presi lent of the Mason City Chamber if Commerce and also headed the Community Chest and other com munity enterprises As mayor he gave material as istance to launching of a program hat resulted in substantial reduc ion in the citys debt He was resident of the Iowa Manufactur rs association 2 years and a mem er of the executive committee of he organization 10 years STOLE SAFE Burglars in Ottumwa food mar et did not take the time to blow pen the safe They removed safe nd all and blew it open at their onvenience in Memorial park It contained cence of government by injunc tion He referred to the courts re straining order directing him to withdraw his contract termination notice which led to the strike Lewis declared the order de prives the miners of their consti tutional rights as American citi zens Pending sentence Goldsborough directed that Lewis go free of bond in custody of his counsel In announcing his verdict Goldsborough emphasized that Lewis was guilty both individually and as president of UMW and that UMW is separately guilty Then he said quietly that having found Lewis guilty of contempt he considered the question of sen tence of course very important1 After the judge announced his verdict Lewis asked for and was granted permission to make a statement Lewis said The history of la bor injunctions prior to 1932 is a sordid one After reviewing a Mstory of government statutes forbidding courts to restrain strikes he turned Quickly to coal strike is sues and inveighed against the deadly brutal 54hour work week in American coal mines Lewis asserted the UMW had been impelled to announce term ination of its contract with the government on Nov 15 This step led to the coal strike and the con tempt proceeding against Lewis and the UMW After his announcement that the contract was ended Lewis said thegovernment inviolation of the NorrisLa Guardia anti junction act asked for a restrain ing order and it was granted without notice and without hearing Sonorously he went on de nouncing this coercive and all embracing restraining o r d e r which he was accused of ignor Speaking officially as presi dent of the UMW and vice presi dent of the AFL with 8000000 members Lewis said he could not subscribe to this ugly recrude scence of government by injunc tion Addressing the court he said Your injunction sir I respect fully submit deprives the miners of these constitutional rights freedom of speech freedom of the press freedom of assembly and freedom from involuntary servi tude The miners and I stand upon these constitutional rights as American citizens The miners are lawabiding Godfearing citizens he said and have only asserted their rights as citizens As he finished and stalked to a seat behind his lawyers Judge Goldsborough shuffled papers quietly for a minute while the courtroom buzzed The jurists finding of guilty of contempt of court ended one phase of the governments legal drive to get the 400000 soft coal miners back on the job Still on ap is the governments request to make the restraining order a cmporary injunction It was uncertain xvhether the ludge Wednesday will issue a rui ng on this The judge could continue the case to bring out more testimony on the legality of the government JMW coal contract or he might decide he had heard sufficient evi dence on that point and announce his ruling simultaneously with the sentencing of Lewis Lewis attorneys ended their de cnse abruptly after the couri had idmllted documentary evidence hat the mine union leader de lared last May 29 that his contract vilh the government signed that day settled all issues for the pe riod of government operation of he coal mines This evidence was in the form if a newsreel transcript Over vigorous defense objec ions Goldsborough also admitted a United Mine Workers brief filed n another case which contended hat the government operates the mines in its role as sovereign   

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