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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: November 18, 1946 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - November 18, 1946, Mason City, Iowa                                NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME EMUTMENT Br HI4T0RY ANS ARCHIVES KOINES I A THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS IJ ifou un Associated Press and United Press Full Leased Wires Five Cents a Copy MASON CITY IOWA MONDAY NOVEMBER 18 1946 This Paper Consists of Two One No 3t One Mans Opinion A Badio Commentary By W EARL HALL Managing Editor BROADCAST SCHEDULE GLO Uuon CHj IM P TAD CJnlncT HI Mon T nv 70L Ames Tncsfor ft m raw Citj Tbunilmy OL If People Decide Wars Are Doomed no secret that the common A people of the world dont like i1 those who are i called upon to do the fighting and the dying In my contacts with thousands of youngsters in the European theater during the 11 height of the last war I never found one who seemed to relish pthe ugly business in which he was other young men jior dropping bombs on civilian populations AH of this I think has been I nue down through the centuries IIIt was true Ive an idea back in liithe days when armies attacked other with stones or with H spears The advent of gunpowder Illcertainly didnt change it But with the coming of the air J plane and bombs and robot imple ffments of death the universal dis Jlike of war has been stepped up Civilians have been brought into as targets for mass exter mination Even in the war which came an end a little more than a year ago the battlelines stretched i j out hundreds of miles to include great cities And with the advent of radioguided ing atomic a rec ognition by all realistic people that nobody in the future is going to be safe from war merely be cause he is remote from the bat tlelines IN the face of this grim situation then it would seem that human intelligence ought to be able to contrive a way to avert that fu ture war which 999 out of 1000 want so much to avert And oficourse an attempt is being made through the medium of a world peace organization the pattern for which still in the mak ing calls for a lawmaking body a system of international justice a police force to fleal with futiireaggressors r Bui the belief persists in many informed quarters that this ap of and by itself will not jSJffiice More and more theres a feeling that some means must be found to bring world thinking on I the subject cf peace and war into some kind rf reasonable one ness rpHE FederCouncil of Churches 1 commission set up some 5 wears ago fothe purpose of help to leat the nations of the Ifworld to sjust and durable peace Paave expression in its first state ment ID the following significant i noii of view We believe that moral law no than physical law undergirds world There is a moral order which is fundamental and eternal j and which is relevant to the cor i porate life of men and the order ing of human society If mankind is to escape chaos I and recurrent war social and poK institutions must be brought into conformity with this moral 1 order TN A REAL sense this was the A principle upon which the United Nations was founded In its pre amble it stated a determination 1 to save succeeding gener ations from the scourge of war to reaffirm faith in fundament i al human rights in the dignity and worth of the human person in the equal rights of men and women and of nations large and small and j to establish conditions un y der which justice and respect for the obligations arising from trea ties and other sources of interna tional law can be maintained and to promote social progress jjand better standards of life in llarger freedom IN THE accomplishment of these f ends there was a pledge on the jlpart of the signatory V to practice tolerance and Jlivc together in peace with one ilnother as good neighbors and 7 to unite our strength to naintain international peace and I security and y to insure by the acceptance lit principles and the institution of Ijnethocls that armed force Shall 1 not be used save in common in jterest and to employ international j machinery for the promotion of jlhe economic and social advance jment of all peoples IT WAS on this statement of pur poses and these solemn pledges I that the United Nations came into being at San Francisco about a ryear and a half ago i The story of what has happened I since that time is pretty well ifcnown to those who read and iiistcn In some areas there has S oeen progress in others there has f been bickering Some developments have been Discouraging in their nature oth Isrs have constituted a basis for I hope And one of these is the iweation of a United Nations sub 3 idiary agency called the United Ji CONTINUED ON PAGE 2 SERVE INJUNCTION ON LEWIS ODT Orders 25 Per Cent Cut in Rail Passenger Service CAR ACCIDENTS KILL 7 IOWANS OVER WEEKEND 4 Members of Wedding Party Die in Collision Close to Emmetsburg By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Six persons including 4 mem bers of en route to a wed ding at Graettinger Iowa were killed in traffic accidents in Iowa over the weekend Le Roy Davis 24 Sioux City prospective bridegroom died In an automibile accident west of Emmetsburg Sunday which also look the lives of Mr and Mrs Ray Smith Sioux City and their 4 yearold daughter Sharon Jean Hastings of Graettinger the bridetobe also a passenger suffered scalp lacerations and shock The Smiths were to have seen attendants at the wedding of Davis and Miss Hastings Thurs day In addition 4 of 5 persons rid ng in the other car involved in he crash 7 miles west of Emmets jurg on Highway 18 were being reated for injuries in an Emmets DUrg hospital Sheriff Tom McCaffrey said Earl Huben of Ruthvcn Iowa told ifficers he was driving west when IB saw a tire blow out on the Smith car approaching him The sheriff said Huben told him be lulled off the side of the road rat the Smith car went out of control and slammed broadside nto his automobile Riding with Huben were his jrotherSteve Huben and Steves 3 stepchildren Bob Phelps 8 Shirley Phelps 4 and Russell Phelps 6 Earl Huben was dis missed after treatment at the hos pital The accident put the entire Juben family in the hospital Already in the Emmetsburg hos ital was Mrs Huben who gave lirth to a baby Sunday night Huben and the children were en route home after visiting at the lospital when the accident oc curred While the injured were being aken to a hospital at Emmetsburg oDowing the crash a doorof the ambulance came open and Earl Ellsworth funeral director fell n to thepavement He suffered acial cuts and body bruises but was not seriously hurt Russell Phelps who were unconscious when taken to he hospitalhad recovered con ciousness Monday morning and vere reported in fair condition at he hospital The accident occurred just 17 miles east of the accident on high way 18 Friday night when Charles lough 23 of Mallard and Vern 5wenson 53 of Curlew were killed In another accident William O Rule 34yearold marine veteran of Washington Iowa was killed vhen his car overturned on high vay 218 Saturday night 14 miles lorth of IowaCity His wife was injured seriously At Cedar Falls Peter H Claus n 85 of Cedar Falls was killed Saturday when struck by a taxi ab on the northern edge of the ity state highway Patrolman Donald French reported Miss Dessie Moores 18 Wood iine high school senior and drum majorette was killed early Sunday n the collision of a car in which he was riding and a westbound Northwestern passenger train at i crossing on the north edge of Woodbine She was the daughter f Mr and Mrs Raymond Moores who live east of here Tall Corn Washington Iowa UR Don ladda Washington Iowa farmer Monday again claimed the worlds allcorn growing championship vhen he was announced as winner f the Washington Journals an mal contest with a stalk 31 feet ligh Radda who has won the Jour nals contest for 9 straight years eld the previous worlds record vith a stalk 28 feet 5 inches Raise Paper Prices Cincinnati Cincinnati Inquirer in Mondays editions an ounced its price per copy was ncreased a penny to 5 cents be ause of increased costs of pro uction In line with the trend ad ertising rates also are being in reased the announcement said I AP IVfrepfeoto IOWA FIRE ruins and debris are all that remained of a grocery and hatchery in Marion after fire ravaged them early Sunday morning Firemen from nearby Cedar Rapids were called to help quell the blaze in freezing temperatures De stroyed were the Me Too selfservice grocery and market and the adjoining Gordon hatchery Molotov Will Consider Curb BULLETIN New York Soviet For eign Minister Molotov agreed Tuesday to consider British American and Chinese propos als for voluntarily restricting use of the veto in the United Nations security council but he reserved his right to reject all of them later New York Foreign Secretary Bevin intends to urge the Big5 powers of the United Nations Monday to draft a new code of conduct restraining use of their veto power in the U N security council This was disclosed by authori tative informants as the Big 5 foreign ministers moved to lift the veto issue temporarily from the IS N assembly and add it to their own already heavy tasks finish ing the satelite peace treaties and beginning German peace talks By such action Bevin and Secre tary of State Byrnes were reported aopeful they could meet the anti veto criticisms of small nations and simultaneously preserve co operatiSn with Russia Soviet Foiv eign Minister Molotov agreed to alk things over The formula of Big5 private talks was used when the charter was written at San Francisco The United Nations itself was asked in a sense to sanction the procedure France proposed that he assemblys political and se curity committee drop all veto dis cussion Monday until the foreign ministers have acted While the foreign ministers thus added to their problems diplomats held high hope that one peace is sue Trieste might be near set tlement at last They reported it probable that a break in the Trieste deadlock of the Italian icacc treaty was at hand though t could be upset by Russian in sistence on setting a deadline for Britain and the United States to pull their troops out of Trieste If the deadlock is broken as quickly as some expect it should allow the ministers to begin about midweek as scheduled their preliminary talks on the future of Germany Byrnes hopes in this connection to revive his 40year sovietre ected German disarmament xeaty and get Russian agreement o assigning American Russian British and French deputy for eign ministers to begin laying out permanent German peace set lement owan Fatally Wounded While Cleaning Shotgun Davenport Thomas H Peters 22 who resided on a farm near Eldridge was fatally wounded Sunday afternoon while le was cleaning a shotgun after returning home from a hunting trip Coroner Frank C Keppy who nvestigated said no inquest would be held Truman Takes Rest in Florida Key West Fla UR President Truman put on a tan sports shirt and a white wool cap Monday and relaxed while Secretary of Interior J AKrug led he first round of fight with United The president abandoned himself to the enjoyment of a rest de clining to talk about his problems including the threatened coal strike which overshadowed all others Mr Truman arrived here aboard the presidential plane Sacred Cow Sunday for a muchneeded weeks vacation in the Florida Keys He will be joined by Hecon version Director John R Steelman on Wednesday or Thursday Later in the week Secretary of Treasury John Shyder may join the party which will be headquartered at the commandants quarters of the Key West naval base until Saturday Government Sets Corn Loans at a Bushel Average Steelman Authorizes Rates at 90 Per Cent of Oct 1 Parity Price Washington Stabilization Director John R Steelman Mon day authorized government loans to producers of the 1946 corn crop at 90 per cent of the October 1 parity price The loans will be offered by the Commodity Credit Corporation Steelman said the agriculture department reports that the loan program is necessary to enable producers to retain stocks on farms for feeding purposes and to stabilize and protect the price of corn The agriculture department an nounced later that the loan rates will average a bushel na tionally ranging from 5105 to 13i by counties This is based on a parity price of S128 Generally speaking rates are lighest near major market cen ters This reflects the normal var iation in market prices resulting from transportation costs Last years loan rates averaged a bushel and ranged from 90 cents to a bushel by coun ties The parity price then was less Corn eligible for loan must grade number 3 or better except for moisture Content or number 4 on test weight only Corn grading mixed will have a loan value of 2 cents a bushel less Loans will be available to pro ducers from Dec 1 through next July 31 In recent years corn oans were available only through May Loans will bear interest at the rate of 3 per cent a year Produc ers may pay off loans at any tune jrior to September 1 1947 or they may voluntarily deliver corn as payment on and after that date Upon delivery of corn grading ligher than number 3 the pro ducer will be credited with a pre mium of i cent a bushel for num Der 2 and 1 cent a bushel for num ber 1 In Des Moines Jack McLaugh iin of the Iowa ProductionMar keting Administration said the amount of Iowas bumper crop put under the loan program would depend largely on the market srice of corn as compared with ihe loan rate About 2000000 bushels of corn were scaled last year he reported but said that 1939 had been the states biggest year That year 144000000 bushels were sealed McLaughlin said county com mittees would recommend loans on all corn offered to them pro viding it met requirements of eli gibility Man Apologizes But Is Fatally Wounded Washington George E Janey 34 accidentally stepped upon a fellow passengers foot Sunday in a crowded trolley car As Janey turned to apologize witnesses told police the other man pulled a gun fired once and escaped from the cars center door Janey wounded in the stomach died a few hours later Weather Report FORECAST Mason City Fair and warmer Monday night becoming cloudy Tuesday Colder Tuesday after noon and night Iowa Generally fair and warmer Monday night Tuesday partly cloudy south and cloudy north portions Colder northwest and extreme north portion Tuesday afternoon Low Monday night 35 to 40 High Tuesday 40 northwest to 58 Southeast Minnesota Cloudy Monday night and Tuesday with occasional snow north and central Colder south and decidedly colder north with temperatures falling to 5 to 10 above north and 20 to 25 above south by Tuesday morning Moderately strong southerly winds shifting to northerly winds IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics for 24 hour period ending at 8 oclock Monday morning Maximum 34 Minimum 27 At 8 a m Monday 30 YEAR AGO Maximum 41 Minimum 29 Glob eGazette weather statis tics for 24 hour period ending at 8 oclock Sunday morning Maximum 33 Minimum 14 At 8 a m Sunday 19 YEAR AGO Maximum 61 Minimum 33 PLACE BAN ON TRAINS USING COAL FOR FUEL Agency Warns of Curbs on Rail Freight If Pit Stoppage Continues Washington office of defense transportation Monday or dered a 25 per cent reduction in railroad passenger service per formed by coalburning locomo tives effective at p m next Sunday ODT said the order was issued because of the threatened stop page of production of bituminous coal The agency warned further that a continued stoppage of bitumin ous mining operations would re sult in the curtailment of freight parcel post mail and railway ex press shipments and all export traffic except food clothing and medicine The rail passenger order pro vides that no railroad shall op erate daily coalburning passen ger locomotive mileage in excess of 75 per cent of the total such mileage operated on Nov 1 1946 The order said the railroads may apply the cuts in passenger serv ices arid passenger reservations at their own discretion The order bans circus trains carnival trains special passenger trains and any other train which a railroad is not required to trans port as a common carrier Bevin Vote of Confidence London house of com mons unanimously gave Foreign Secretary Bevins foreign policy a vote of confidence Monday night The vote was 353 to 0 against an amendment by 58 labor mem bers of parliament urging that the governments foreign policy steer a middle course between the United States and Russia It came after Attlee denying that Britain was ganging up with the United States against the soviet union declared we are notseeking an exclusive Anglo American alliance He made that observation in reply to a specific request that he repudiate Winston Churchills Fulton Mo speech suggesting such an alliance Labor party rebels in the house had urged Attlee to deny that an AngloAmerican alliance as sug gested by Winston Churchill had come into being and had widened a world split between the United States and Russia One of the 58 labor opponents of Foreign Secretary Bevins poli cies R H S Grossman said Brit ain must have no exclusive mili tary or economic ties with the U S where he asserted affairs are in the hands of power ful ambitious men of the war and navy departments General Chiang Orders Probe of Blood Plasma Sold on Black Market Shanghai UR Generalissimo Chiang KaiShek Monday ordered the Chinese central health admin istration to make a full investiga tion into the handling of Ameri can Red Cross blood plasma which was sold on the Shanghai black market U S navy shore patrolmen stood guard over a store in which tens of thousands of units of plas ma were reported cached Mayor K C Wu and U S au thorities meanwhile made efforts to find a basis of agreement for repurchase of the plasma already sold to Chinese dealers and for recovery of as much plasma as possible not already distributed to other Chinese cities or sold locally A representative of one firm said he was willing to sell the plasma back to the U 5 foreign liquidation commission which sold it as surplus at a reasonable price He declined however to state what he considered reason able Keep refrigerators away from direct sunlight and away from the stove water heater or radiator Outside heat will increase the op erating costs and prove harmful to the finish 31000 Mine Workers Quit Ahead of Time Pittsburgh left the soft coal pits by the thousands Monday in sporadic walkouts starting 72 hours in advance o the general shutdown threatened for Wednesday midnight in the nations bituminous coal fields Estimates from company sources placed the number of idle at more than 31000 in 6 states Of these 15000 were reported out in Illinois 6500 in Pennsyl vania 2000 in Alabama and 8000 in West Virginia Kentucky and Virginia Thpse who laid down their tools however represented only a small part of the nations 400000 miners in the soft coal industry Fred S Wilkey secretary of the Illinois Coal Operators association reported only 7 shaft mines and 18 strip mines employing United Mine Workers were operating in Illinois He said most of the big shaft mines were down In West Virginia a UMW spokesman reported absenteeism was high at working pits The West Virginia closings were in the southern section Among the pits closed in Penn sylvania were 4 owned by6steel companies which would be hard hit in event of a protracted shut down of the mines While the majority of the mines continued in operation Monday one West Virginia UMW No 5948 at no tice that the government appeal fell on deaf ears Otis McKinney president of the local said Lewis has been asked in a telegram to grant no exten sion the contract adding We are backing the greatest labor leader of the world West Virginia is the largest of the soft coal producing states em ploying 102000 miners Pennsyl vania ranks next with 100000 pit workers ALL MINES IN IOWA WORKING No Fear of Shortage m State Institutions Des Moines of the last few days in the soft coal situation have not produced any change in the Iowa mines G D Miller area district manager for the solid fuels administrator said Monday Miller said all nonunion mines and 13 union mines were operat ing in Iowa Seven union mines all in the vicinity of Centerville have not operated for several months be cause they cant operate under the KrugLewis agreement Mil ler said Heads of state institutions have not yet expressed any fear of the situation said Dave Dancer secre tary of the state board of educa tion and P F Hopkins chairman of the slate board of control Both indicated however the in stitutions could not go on indef initely without trouble if the threatened coal mine strike be comes a reality Hopkins said some of the board of control institutions have a 10 day to 2weefc supply others could go along with present supplies for as much as 2 months Pays Pair to Kill SemiInvalid Wife 34 St Louis calm quiet spoken garage mechanic insisted Monday that he paid a hired as sassin toput his semiinvalid wife out of her misery and that he himself did not pull the trigger Emil Hutsel 37 told authorities he hired a Negro couple to kill his wife Margaret 34 last Friday night because he could not stand to see her suffer but could not bear to kill her himself Mrs Hutsel suffered a paralytic stroke several months ago and Hutzel figured she would be bet ter off dead he said in a signed statement made to Sheriff Arthur Mosley of St Louis county The slaying actually cost S150 Hutsel said because another Negro accepted money to do the job and then doublecrossed him Mrs Nichols Resigns Des Moines state board of control has announced the resignation of Mrs Ethel B Nichols Des Moines as superin tendent of the childrens division of the board The board said she planned to make her home in southern California COURT ACTION TAKEN TO STOP COAL WALKOUT Federal Judge Signs Restraining Order to Bar Contract End Washington f The justice department announced Monday Federal Judge T Alan Goldsbor ough has signed a temporary order designed to restrain a walkout by John L Lewis 400000 soft coal miners The department said the re straining order bars Lewis from terminating at Wednesday mid night his working contract with the government Goldsboroughs order the de partment said expires Nov 27 at 3 p m unless before such time the order for good cause shown is extended or unless the defendants consent that it may be extended for a longer period A hearing on the justice depart ments request for a preliminary injunction to bar breach of con tract was set for hearing Nov 27 at 10 a m An hour after the courts order was issued it was served person ally on Lewis at UMW headquar ters by 2 deputy marshals A UMW official told reporters how ever Lewis would have no state ment Monday The court action was taken as thousands of miners quit work curtailing bituminous production in advance of the termination deadline given by Lewis According to the justice depart ment Goldsboroughs order Mon day restrained Lewis and the United Mine Workers from breaching any of their obliga tions under the KrugLewis agreement and from coercing instigating inducing or encourag ing the mine workers at the bi tuminous coal mines in the gov ernments possession or any of them or any person to interfere by strike slowdown walkout ces sation of work or otherwise with the operation of said mines by continuing in effect the aforesaid notice or by issuing any notice of termination of agreement or through any other means or de vice and from interfering with or obstructing the exercise by the secretary of the interior of his functions under executive order 9728 and from taking any action which would interfere with this courts jurisdiction or which would impair obstruct or render fruitless the determination of this case by the court Executive order 9728 is the or der of President Truman seizing the 3300 bituminous coal mines during last springs strike May 22 Goldsborough is a justice of the federal district courts here and long served in congress as a dem ocratic representative from Mary land Hours before he acted on the governments complaint miners by the thousands were quitting their jobs in advance of the Wed nesday deadline set by Lewis or der President Truman had called for a showdown fight with Lewis over the threat of another nation wide soft coal strike Mr Truman was vacationing in Florida but intimates said he had left orders for subordinates in the capital to either smash Lewis leadership of the miners or bring him to terms on a deal to keep mines going Lewis rejecting a government proposal for a truce has termin ated the miners wage contract effective Wednesday a signal for a complete shutdown in the mine fields The govern ment insists the contract still is effective Aside from stayonthejob ap peds to miners a high govern ment official reported that gov ernment plans to block a mine shutdown include possible legal action to United Mine Workers funds a judgment restrain ing Lewis and the miners from carrying out a strike prosecute Lewis under the SmithConnally act which bans strikes in governmentseized plants Elect lowan DCS Moines M Miller Des Moines was elected first vice chairman of the section on international and comparative law at the recent American Bar association convention at Atlantic City N J He also was elected a director of the American Judica ture society   

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