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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: October 31, 1946 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - October 31, 1946, Mason City, Iowa                                H i APCH i vc NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS VOLLHI Associated Press and United Press Full Leased Wiles Five Cents a Copyl MASON CITIT IOWA THURSDAY OCTOBER 31 1946 This Paper Consists of Two One No 19 UN DEBATES DISARMAMENT PLANS STRIKE IDLE IN 1ST 9 HAS BIG BOOST Days Lost by Labor Rifts 3 Times Greater Than During Entire 45 Washington idle ness during the first 9 months o 1946 exceeded by nearly 3 times the working time similarly lost in all of 1945 the previous record year Government figures which showed this Thursday placed at 98225000 the number of man days lost due to management labor disputes during the January throughSeptember period For all of last year the total was 38025000 Earlier peaks were 28 425000 in 1937 26219000 in 1927 and 23048000 in 1941 The bureau of labor statistics which compiled the figures said the number of strikes and lock outs for the first 9 months of this year totaled 3575 compared with 3784 for all of 1945 The reason for the big jump in man days lost officials said is that postwar strikes have been bitter and for keeps hence ex tended for longer periods During the war walkouts generally were small spontaneous and quickly settled BLS didnt begin keeping its present type of strike statistics un til 1927 so no comparison is possi ble between the postwar year 1946 and the postwar year 1919 on the man days of work lost The BLS statistics show how strikes became more severe im mediately after the war ended Threefourths of all the 38025000 i mandaysVidle in 1945 came in the A months following VJ day Thereafter the long and wide f spread steel auto coal and elec trie workers strikesbeganto pile February yj with 21500000 maiHdays Jost SUMMON CHIEFS i FROM GERMANY r Americans Called for r Conference on Treaty Washington of State Byrnes disclosed Thursday that he has summoned American occupation chiefs back from Ger many for consultations in con nection with a possible German peace treaty The gettogether would be to discuss the possibility of laying the groundwork for such a treaty at the forthcoming foreign minis ters council Byrnes told his news conference that he has asked Gen Lucius D Clay and his civilian adviser Rob ert Murphy to return here Nov 10 for conferences on both prelim inary and permanent problems involved in reaching a peace pact The secretary made it clear that he Is firmly opposed to making Vandalism Mars Beggars Nighfin Mason Cify Two youngsters were being held for juvenile court the Peoplels Gas and Electric company was re placing approximately 50 street lights many home owners were surveying damages and hunting missing articles and the chief of police was considering Thursday the possible discontinuance of beggars night in Mason City in future years Wednesdays beggars night was marred by vandalism that cannot be tolerated Chief Haroli E Wolfe made it plain Additiona officers will be on duty Halloween to see that there is no recurrence he added and anyone caught do ing property damage will have to face in court The chief called particular at tention to 2 complaints made to him Thursday morning One was a letter from M C Lawson Win rtebago council president of the Boy Scouts of America and tfi VANDALISM gate was broken anTa bird bath was shattered at the M C Lawson home SO Crescent drive on Beggars Night Other damage was reported about the city according to police who planned to increase the number on duty Thursday night Truman Takes Cotton Price Problem Under Advisement any further trips to Europe in quest of peace there unless con crete hopes for reaching a settle ment in Germany can be found at the council Byrnes scoffed Tat reporters suggestions thatthe alliescould best reach an accord by attempting to solve their problems on a global rather than a piecemeal basis Byrnes said the questionof a German peace treaty will be taken up after discussion of the five treaties for the axis Italy Finland Rumania Bulgaria and Hungary Hens Make Yokes MonmoUth 111 hens on Miss Jewell Paynes farm arent comedians but theyre cackling over some of their own yolks The other day Miss Payne broke 3 eggs andfound she had 7 Two had double yolks and the 3rd had a triple yolk The next day she broke 3 eggs arid all 3 had double yolks 60 Cent Sirloin or Bust Movement On in Nations Capital Washington cry of 60 cent sirloin or bust went up Thursday from leaders of 12 civic organizations claiming 260000 members They set up 33 stations in shop ping centers where they will try to sign consumers to a pledge No meat purchases formore than 60 cents a oound r Steelman Joins in Study of Situation as JVtarket GoesJUp CL Washington Presiden Truman tookthe cotton price sit uation under advisement Thursday but white house Secre ary Charles G Ross said he ex pects no immediate governmeni action Ross said at a news conference hat the matter is being studied both by Mr Truman and Kecon ersion Director John R Steel man On the principal cotton ex ihanges Thursday cotton surged upward the daily limit of a iale Earlier Rep Sparkman D Ala had predicted some govern ment move possibly by nightfall Ross said he did not know what ction may be taken adding that is up to Mr Trumman and Steel Top level OPA officials lined up against any suggestions that price ceilings be yanked from manufac tured cotton products One price executive told porter Nothing OPA could do would help at this time In New York the spirited rally in cotton prices was said to stem from a growing belief on the part of a large number of brokers traders and others interested in the staple that the government would take some action of afav orable nature to raw cotton It was noted PresidentTruman had the matter advisement Whether this would take the form of removing ceiling prices on finished textile products removal of the limitation onad vance pricing by mills on finished products or an increase in the parity were widely discussed top ics as the market took on its brighter Before the cotton exchanges re sumed trading after Wednesdays Sparkman told a re porter he expected Steelman to wipe out a 120day limitation on advance pricing by mills of fin ished cotton goods 29 Persons Rescued in Snowbound Mountains Salt Lake City but 4 of 33 persons stranded in snow bound Utah mountains had been rescued Thursday by searching parties using snowplows and bull dozers to break through waistdeep drifts to reach them Two deer hunters remained iso lated in mountains near Ogden Utah and 2 others were stranded near Cedar City in southern Utah but both parties had shelter and were believed to be in no immedi ate danger Efforts to reach them were continuing Thursday A party of 8 men 5 women and 3 children in a logging party was rescued after being marooned in mountains near Provo after part of the group snowshoed to a for est service telephone to summon aid Eight hunters were rescued in wagons equipped as sleds lOEIppSp IIFREED Clash Seen Between OPA and Director Steelman Washington of the nations shoeindustry as well as removal of ceilings on all leather went into effect Thursday OPA officials said retail shoe prices might soar 20 to 30 per cent above present levels before they begin to turn downward A clash between OPA and Re conversion Director John R Steel man was seen in the fact that the decontrol emphasized by the on white house orders from Steelman The OPA itself had flatly de clared two weeks ago when Pres ident Truman freed meats and livestock that the lid would re mainon shoes and leather In a price rise the OPA notedthat production is ex pected to lag 50000000 behind the estimated 550000000 pairs needed in 1947 The end of all price tags on shoes came exactly one year to the day after wartime rationing of shoes was lifted OPA meanwhile let it be known that its master decontrol plan originally scheduled to be made public tomorrow will not be re leased untilnext week presum ably afterthe election Officials have said the adminis trations decision on what to do about the present wage stabiliza tion board is simultaneously leader in that organizations boj work for many years in Nort Iowa The other complaint was mad in person the chief said by man who wanted a permit issue to him to carry a gun He pro posed to show with a shotgu anyone who tried to commit Hal loween pranks on his property The man did not get the permi Chief Wolfe said but the office pointed out the temper of house holders with whom youngster might get involved if they wer abroad Thursday evening Lawson listed damage at hi home as follows When I arrive home I found that part of th stone wall around my house ha been broken down A well dc signed concrete bird bath had bee smashed to pieces A steel ani wrought iron bird bath was stolen At least t was not able to find i after considerable search A lad der which I had borrowed wa stolen A drain trough back of my house was stolen Every possible attempt wa made to break down a bird feed trough in my yard but this is on a steel post and it stood up unde the punishment However another hanging bird feed trough wa smashed to the ground and the bracket which was fastened to thi tree was bent almost to the ground A large gate in my arbor wa wrenched and broken not merely broken from the hinges but delib erately smashed My garden hose which was coiled up had been connected to the outlet and an attempt made to flood my garage When I re turned home part of the floor was still covered with water and the concrete in back of my house as well asconsiderable space arount it was drenched with water anc the water was still running Some damage also was done to the B C Way gardens particu larly by the tossing of rocks into the terraces on the bank of Wil low creek at the footbridge A wrought iron bird feeding tray also was destroyed Air was let out of the tires of a number 61 cars parked in the if ea7 the clfrelE added Herve Towner ibS Linden drive reported that he was attackec a gang of boys while driving to he business district during the evening and his car and person plastered with green tomatoes Mayor Howard E Bruce con demned any guilty of such acts as those reported as being unpa triotic and wasting the substance of our country at a time when we need it so much They will be irosecuted to the full extent of he law he stated All the islands in the world have less area than the United States plus Alaska Weather Report FORECAST Mason City Partly cloudy Thurs day night and Friday with little change in temperature Iowa Cloudy south and partly cloudy north portion Thursday night and Friday with occa sional rain southeast and ex treme south central portions Thursday night Little change in temperature Low Thursday night 35 northwest to 45 south east High Friday 5560 Minnesota Fair Thursday night and Friday Somewhat warmer Friday IN MASON CITY HobeGazette weather statistics for 24 hour period ending at 8 oclock Thursday morning Maximum 52 Minimum 30 At 8 a m Thursday 35 YEAR AGO Maximum 66 Minimum 22 TRAFFIC DEATHS IN CITIES DOWN Council Reports Rural Fatalities Going Up UR City Chicago deaths have been traffic reduced but the rural death toll still is soar ing the National Safety council reported Thursday The council said that rural traf fic deaths in September were up 16 per cent over last January while the city toil had been re duced 28 per cent For the year however city deaths have risen 6 per cent over 1945 while the rural toll has mounted 48 per cent the council said Total traffic deaths in the 1st 9 months of this year were re ported at 24400 30 per cent high er than the same 1945 period Of this number2940 were killed in September the council said The figures were based on returns from 44 states Among cities of more than 250 000 population San Diego Cal reported the greatest 1946 reduc tion in traffic fatalities during the 1st 9 months The San Diego rate dropped 42 per cent Louisville Ky was the largest city to report no deaths during September Milwaukee Wis with 3 deaths per lOjOOO registered automobiles had the lowest traffic toll of cities of more than 500000 population Omaha Nebr led the 100000 250000 population group with a 13 death rate OFFICIALS MAP PLAN FOR COAL SESSION FRIDAY Shutdown Looms for Chicago Stockyards Trouble in Ford Motor By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS New threats of work stoppage appeared on the nations industria front Thursday as government of ficials mapped plans to meet wit John L Lewis Friday hopeful o averting a strike by 400000 sof coal miners The officials who arc to mee with the president of the AFL United Mine Workers said thcj are willing to discuss Lewis brings up but they have no agreed to reopen the present con tract Lewis won a meeting wit the government after he implied there would be a coal strike on Nov 1 unless wage negotiation were reopened The UMW chief has indicated that a strike for higher pay may occur despite government opera tion of the mines but the govern ment is anxious to avoid a shut down of the pits which it seized last May during a 59day strike by the miners In Chicago there was a threat o a shutdown of operations at thi big stock yards making idle somi 25000 workers while in Detroi officials of Ford local 600 of th IO United Auto Workers said they soon would file with the na tional labor relations board a 30 day strike notice against the Fore Motor company covering 70000 workers at the companys Rouge plant After a new outbreak of fight ing between pickets and police a the strikebound Allis Chalmers Manufacturing company plant in West Allis Wis Mayor Arnold Kleritsr toSecretary ol tabor Scbwelknbachito have the company and ClOUnited Auto Workers resume negotiations in an effort to settle the 6 months old dispute The threatened work stoppage at the Chicago slock yards came as a result of a wage dispute in olving 450 stockhandlers who spokesman for the CIO United Packinghouse Workers said might strike anytime after Thursday night if demands for wage in creases 16 cents an hour are not met A strike would idle other workers in the worlds largest stock yards A meeting was planned Thursday by the union and officials of the Union Stock Yards Transit Co with a fed eral conciliator The flurry of renewed fighting at the AllisChalmers plant marked the 3rd successive day of disorders on the picket lines Po ice dnd deputy sheriffs were the argets of rock fruit and paint and autos were tipped over and vindows in cars broken Nine persons were arrested In the 11day old strike by 1400 AFL pilots against the Trans Vorld airline in a wage dispute Tederal Mediator Frank P Doug ass expressed hopes of bringing he disputants together Two strikes scheduled to start hursday were delayed In New York the threatened walkout by 000 Western Union Telegraph Co employes was averted a few lours before the a m dead ine Thursday by an agreement o extend the present contract to April 1 1947 and for employes o receive wage hikes These in luded 16i cents an hour to all onmessenger employes and 10 ents for messengers The CIO merican Communications Asso iation had asked 30 cents and ther changes Select Arbitrator in iollywood Union Rift Hollywood Keen n secretary ofthe Chicago Fed ration of Labor AFL for 11 ears has been chosen by film la or groupsto act as permanent ar itrator in settling minor disputes etween rival AFL unions in the lovie industry His acceptance as awaited Thursday Bullet Causes 10 Day Headache Rockford 111 Bruce Axberg a towheaded 8 year old walked around for 10 days with a bullet in his head It bothered him when he tried to rnn but he thoughtit was just a bad headache The 22 calibre rifle bullet was discovered Wednesday and re moved Wednesday night at Swedish American hospital Dr Gregory Green who performed the operation said the bullet had entered the forehead at the hairline passed through the scalp and furrowed the skull bone Bruce was resting in a hospital bed Thursday His condition was reported good A neighbor woman found Bruce lying in the street bleeding from a head wound Oct 20 Shetook him home to his mother Mrs Richard Axberg Bruce told his mother he hurt himself by falling off bis Dicycle He said he felt something like a stone strike his forehead i just before he fell AP Wlrepfcoto BRITISH EMBASSY WRECKED BY gaping hole was torn in the British embassy building in Rome Italy Thursday morning by an explosion which wrecked the entire wing of the building Investigate Italian Passerby Is Seriously Wounded Building Wing Wrecked Rome thundering bomb explosion which shook the city vrecked an entire wing of the British embassy early Thursday and wounded an Italian passerby perhaps mortally Police and em assy officials confessed them elves without a clue as to the dentity of the perpetrators A gaping hole reaching back for depth of 2 rooms was torn into he building by the blast resull ng from 2 suitcases full of explo ives detonated by clockwork The heavy masonry of the blocklong story structure was cracked so ieeply that police said part of it might have to be pulled down Embassy personnel escaped in ury but 2 Italian passersby were vounded One of them Nicolino Plitta was said to have been hurt o badly that he may die Four mbassy guards were thrown from heir beds but were not hurt J G Ward the British charge 1affaires said the blast which iccurred at a m sounded to dm like a 500pounder throughout the building n Venti Settembro street in up own Rome and in buildings cross the street were shattered he apartment of Ambassador Sir Charles who is away on eave was damaged heavily Italian investigators said they ould not even think of a reason vhy anyone in Italy should want o bomb the British for sustained riticism of British policies has een lacking in Italy since the war nded Ward and Michael Stewart iritish press attache said they Iso were mystified by the bomb er It would be useless to specu ate said Stewart There are f course many irresponsibles who night have done ews Egyptian nationalists and so n but I couldnt give a guess A detective on duty at the scene azarded the theory that diehard ists who strewed explosives round a half dozen Italian cities Monday on the 24th anniversary f Benito Mussolinis march on ome might have been responsi le ncHana Professor Sfobel Prize Winner Stockholm IP Prof Herman Muller of Indiana has been warded this years nobel prize in nedicine and physiology it was nnounced officially Thursday ight Muller a worldfamed gene cist is professor of zoology at ndiana university Mexican jumping beans jump because of the movements of moth larvae spinning their cocoons in side the beans MYSTERY BLAZE KILLS 3 SEAMEN Believe Incendiary Bomb Was Tossed Into House seamen were burned to death in a fire which swept a waterfront rooming house early Thursday and Bat talion Chief Thomas Heagerty of the fire department said a home made incendiary bomb apparently was tossed into the living room Police said the owner had re ceived a warning a week ago A fourth man was critically burned four others were hospi talized with third degree burns and one other was injured when he jumped from a second floor window Chief Heagerty said a onegal lon can which apparently had con tained gasoline was found in the living room debris Patrolman Bernard E Thomas said he was standing at a nearby intersection when he heard the large plate glass window in the front of the building crash At the same time Thomas said he saw a man walking awayfrom the building He got into a car which spedaway Jesse Rodriguez owner of the house told police he had been acting as an agent for a Central American steamship line Police quoted him as saying an 18inch monkey wrench with a note at tached was hurled through the same window a week ago The note as released at a district po lice station said Stop rooming Finks in your house This is your final warning HardtoGet Soap Is Going Into Auto Tires Chicago of that soap youve been trying to find at the orner grocery store is being used 0 make automobile tires Dr Waldo L Semon director of pioneering research of the B F Goodrich Co Akron Ohio says Jiat approximately 125000000 sounds of per cent of the nations total go into production of synthetic rubber this year Semon told the American oil chemists society Wednesday that fatty acid derived from soap comprises approximately 6 per cent of American synthetic rub ier Sernon reported that his com pany had developed a synthetic rubber which uses a soap made Tom rosin acid from southern sines and has no fatty acid or allow base This is being used in ires which outwear prewar ires he said FRANCO ISSUE GETSAPPROVAL OF COMMITTEE Soviet Ukraine Makes Vigorous Plea for 0 K of Russian Proposals New York soviet union won a wideopen hearing for her arms limitation program Thursday as the United Nations assembly wound up its opening round of general debate with a vigorous plea from the soviet Ukraine for approval of the Russian proposals The Roahead on the disarma ment discussions was given when the 14nations steering committee voted unanimously to recommend that the 4point soviet proposals be placed on the assemblys agen da The committee also tossed an other highly controversial issue to the assembly floor when it recom mended that the Spanish question be placed on the agenda for a full airing of charges against the Fran co regime The soviet Ukraines foreign minister Dmitri Manuilsky last speaker in the general debate de clared that the time has come for action to slash armaments and free the world of competition for military might Manuilsky devoted most of his hourlong speech to a stout de fense of the veto rights of the 5 major powers in the security coun cil charging that the campaign to limit use of the veto was closely linked with a propaganda drive to spread fear a new war divide the biff powers and discredit the United Nations He declared that the United States fullysupported the veto at the San Francisco conference but that Warren R Austin chief U S delegate now was viewswftenthe1 qnestiori comes up Jif debated The AngloSaxon majority de sires a monopolistic position in the security council he asserted after pointing out that Russia had Deen on the minority side of every important question before the council That he said is one good reason why the veto must be re ained The assembly prepared to start immediately on its debate over the adoption of the agenda expecting to near a Jong list of speakers Jed off by Field Marshal Jan Chris tiaan Smuts prime minister and chief delegate from the Union of South Africa against Indian charges of racial discrimination in lis country The agenda already had been approved by the general commit tee but some the items were expected to be debated at length on the floor possibly extending the debate through Friday The committee agreed unani mously to send the armaments is sue to the 51 nation assembly and o have it referred immediately o the assemblys political commit ee The proposal to put the ques ion on the agenda was offered by British Delegate Philip J Noel Baker I accept the proposal of the representative of the United King dom said Soviet Delegate Andrei Y Vishinsky No other delegates spoke on the question CONVICT ARMOUR ON MEAT SALES Rule Packer Forced Sales of Other Items Philadelphia W District ludge Guy K Bard Thursday convicted Armour Co meat lackers on 17 counts charging it breed butchers to buy other pro ducts in order to obtain meat and butter Sentence was deferred until Dec pending hearing on a motion for new trial offered by an attorney or the company The court earlier this week dis missed 23 counts on a motion by Assistant U S Attorney Joseph E Jold and Thursday acquitted the ompany on 6 others The maxi mum penalty would bo a fine of 5000 on each count Gold said he thought the verdict vas fair ancj would act as a defer ent against further use of this and aggravated parctice He also declared the company aces possibility of losing n government subsidies He pointed out the company in 11 of its branchesthroughout the ountry received approximately 6000000 annually in subsidies nd that the economic stabiliza ion board held the 3480000 to iawait outcome of the trial   

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