Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - October 14, 1946, Mason City, Iowa                                NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME EPMTMENT OF HUTQ3Y AN ARCHIVES KOINES IA THE NEWSPAPER THAT HOME EDITION MAKES ALL NORTH 10WANS NEIGHBORS 4 Associated Press and United FuU One Mans Opinion A Radio Commentary by W EARL HALL Managing Editor BEOAprAST SCHEDULE KGLO Mson CRT Sunday p m WTAD 111 p m WOI Ames Tuesday a m WSU1 City linrsday p m If Our Republic Is to Survive NOT long ago over at a little English city Birkenhead mo tormen and conductors on the lo cal trolley system reached a de cision to go on a strike But at the last minute they changed their minds A spokesman lor the work ers explained the reversal of de cision in these words A strike though justified would be unfair to the public who are innocent In that decision there was rec ognition of a profound fact which has been all but completely ig nored in the epidemic of work stoppages which in the past year have plagued Americas program of industrial reconversion That profound fact is that ITS THE PUBLIC WHICH IS PE NALIZED MOST WHEN WORK ERS LAY DOWN THEIR TOOLS AND GO ON STRIKE IN this commentary I am going to consider that aspect of the industrial strife which threatens the very cornerstone of our American way of life And I shall not be proceeding from any hos tility whatever toward the under lying principle of organized labor I have pride in the fact that it was the newspaper of which I am editor that paved the way for and helped with the organization of our communitys first union In the approximately 40 years since that time there hasnt been so much as an hour of lost time through employeremploye misun derstanding Of that Im proud too But I am saying that the time is at hand when both manage ment and labor must give heed to the publics stake in industrial strife and that failure to do so can have only one final result The doom of our very form of government QUITE a case could be made against the efficacy of strikes from the worker or the company of course For example the General Motors strike of last year An increase of 13i cents an hour was offered and rejected The strike was called and after months off the job an increase somewhat greater than ISA cents was obtained But it will take more than 6 years for the work ers to regain with that increase what they lost in complete idle ness over the extended period of the strike In the case of the steel indus try the same story is duplicated TUT in my approach in this com mentary Im primarily con cerned with what the public lost by that needless work stoppage in the automotive industry First of all that public lost the opportunity to buy thousands ol new automobiles for which there is a crying need The countrys foremost requirement is produc tion and more production The au tomobile strike dealt a solar plexus blow at that objective Next in order of importance is the fact that the strike and its consequent rise in production costs made imperative an appreciably increased price on automobiles anc trucks This penalty has been ex tracted from the public far more than from management What Im saying is that strikes are a public enemy nothing more nor less NOW for a moment lets con sider the contrasting attitude of both labor and management in war and in peace Although its true that during the years when we were fighting for our life against the axis there were work due t strikes they were sporadic and local for the most part In the overall picture management anc labor recognized the need fo maximum production and workei together to that end It was driven into our con sciences that the war would b won or lost by the manner in which we met the challenge o increased production Prominen in our thinking was a patriot angle What everybody or nearly everybody was saying was this We must buckle down and pro duce or we wont have any TJnitei States of America In short in the face of an ex ternal enemy the obligation o every citizen to perform his fa duty for his countrys weliare i both recognized and acted upon WITHOUT questioning the righ to do so the government wit overwhelming public sanction dip down into the local cpmmunit and lays hands on the individua citizen within specified age limil and says Youre needed for mili tary service It has always been so and probably will always be so It an application of the centra thesis about which our govern mcnt was organized and nurtured CONTINUED ON PAGE 2 PEACE PARLEY FINISHES WORK AWAIT DECISION BY TRUMAN ON MEAT PROBLEM President to Give Talk on Radio at 9 p m on Present U S Shortage Washington IF Housewives currying and politicians or votes cocked an ear to the vhite house for President Tru mans decision Monday night on vhat to do about gettingsteaks nd roasts back Hours before the chief execu ves allnetwork broadcast set or 9 p m Central Standard Time ic republican party termed the cheduled address political and emanded radio time to reply While there was no clearcut ndication what Mr Truman plans o say in his 15minute discussion f stabilization and the meat prob em the issue before him boiled own to this Whether to scrap meat controls utright as many republicans and ome democratic leaders have de manded or keep them unchanged Or whether to compromise on ome relaxation of controls in olvihg perhaps higher ceilings a onus plan to induce marketing of livestock and possibly importation f meat Mr Truman is on record as irmly opposed to removal of OPA ontrols He took this stand Sep ember 26 but at a news confer nce last week he declined to com ment when asked whether he had hanged his mind One indication that he may have ame from a high official who is amiliar with the problem He linted to a reporter that top aides helping prepare Mr Trumans peech met at the white house Sunday night and that decontrol of meat is jnthe picture There has been speculation moreover that Mr Truman migH1 eal with wage controls too and lossibly scrap that program On the other hand among those jlaying an active part in drafting he presidents statement are OPA Administrator Paul Porter and Reconversion Director John H iteelman Porter has openly opposed re moval of meat controls Steelman m the subject of controls gen irally recently said that to lei prices go would be the worst lossible course Pheasant Drops in for Dinner Bonner Springs Kans as Mr and Mrs Floyd Wasson sal down to a meatless dinner they heard something strike their house In the yard they found a 3 jound pheasant with his neck iroken Monday the Wassons will lave meat for dinner COURT STUDIES NEW RAIL RATES 9 Northern States Protest Freight Change Washington supremj court Monday agreed to rule on validity of ICC orders increasing class railroad freight rates 10 per cent in the north and east and re ducing them 10 per centin the south and as far west as the Rockies The changes were challenged by nine northern states governors of the six New England states and 33 railroads Class rates affect principally manufactured articles They apply to about four per cent of all rai traffic The changes were orderet after officials of southern state and others asserted freight rate were higher in the south givin competitive advantages to north ern manufacturers The challenging states and the 3 railroads appealed from a decisioi by a special threejudge federa court in Utica N Y last May Th special court after upholding th orders stayed their enforcemen pending action on the appeals t the supreme court The New England governor called the ICC orders arbitrar and capricious They said the were based on an erroneous in terpretation of the law and lacke support of necessary findings o fact The railroads protested tha ICC had made a clean break wit the principles of rate making tha have applied for generations Name Grain Head Des Moines ff Don Edison secretary of the Farmers Grai Dealers association of Iowa wa reelected president of the low Council of Cooperation last wee Dead Woman Returns to Iowa Family Cedar Rapids might ave been a normal family re nion when J T Burns daughter ame from Chicago to visit him xcept for that poor soul in the mily cemetery plot Last Aug 10 Burns paid uneral costs for a woman he had isisted was not his daughter des te police claims to the contrary Burns was proved right Sunday hen the daughter Mrs Tom vans 43 arrived from Chicago urns had sent for his daughter fter receiving a letter from her Now we would like to find out ho that poor soul is out there e said The father related he was told ug 8 by Cedar Rapids police lat his daughter had been found ead of a heart attack in a Chi ago rooming house He had the ody shipped to Cedar Rapids But when he viewed the re mains Burns said he was certain le woman was not his daughter nd iold police and the undcr Jker so He consented to the urial only after Chicago police nsisted upon the identification e said At Chicago police said the ody was that of a woman who ad registered at aWest Madison treet hotel as Mrs Roy Arnold he taken to a mortuary iunday night an employe said a nan using the name Pearl Gates elephoned the mortuary that the ead woman was Burns daugh er The Chicago missing persons ureau said the body also had een identified by an Andrew onway who told them the dead vomans name was Bernice Burns Gates Mrs Evans said she had not written a letter because she had ot received one from her folks or a quite a while Burns said it cost for em aiming and transportation charges o have the body shipped vhere rom Chicago and that burial ex ienses amounted to about1 Though the father declared he was certain at the time that the dead woman was not his daughter ic still was happy to see my laughter here walking around Burns has two other daughter me of whom lives at home His wife died last February Cedar Rapids police said they did not plan to disinter the body jut were leaving it to Chicago police to handle At Chicago Detective Edwan 3alm of the missing persons bureau said Chicago police wpulc not act until they had received official notice of mistaken identi ication and a request to reopen the investigation MOSLEMS JOIN INDIA CONGRESS Move Relieves Tension in Political Situation New Delhi Ali Jinnah president of thi Moslem league Monday wai scheduled to discuss league noml nees for Indias interim govern ment with Viceroy Lord Wave Jinnah announced Sunday in a etter to the viceroy that the eague had decided to join theall India congress party in the new overnnient League sources saic iat 5 Moslems probably woulc ake their seats in the provisiona cabinet by Oct 16 Indias potentially explosive political situation was relievec considerably by the Moslem de cision to participate Formation o a coalition cabinet may presage a new era of communal peace fo he turbulent subcontinent anc aring an end to the bloody riots that have punctuated its history Modern oil wells sometime extend as far as three miles be low the earths surface Drench Vote Constitution Republic AF IVircphoto THEIR GOAL WORLD SERIES mob of baseball fans jams the street in front of the Sportsmans Park at St Louis Mo for tickets to the 7th and deciding World Series game between the St Louis Cardinals and the Boston Red Sox The clubs are tied at 3 games each and Tuesdays battle will determine the diamond championship INDONESIA AND DUTCH END RIFT New Republic and Allies Stop 14 Month Old Fight Batavia The Netherlands government and the Indonesian republic signed a truceagreement Monday calling for immediate ces sation of the 14monthold hos tilities in the East Indies No cease fire order has yet been issued bat the agreement stipulates that the truce between Indonesian and allied forces will be considered in effect as of Mon day The joint truce commission in cluding Indonesian Dutch and British representatives will be charged with truce enforcement The British members will with draw after Nov 30 when the last of Britains armed forces are scheduled to have left Indonesia The Dutch military position in the Indies meanwhile was strengthened by the arrival at Batavia of the Karel Doorman Hollands only aircraft carrier Beef Bonus DCS Moines was a beef roast bonus this weekend for employes of the airline limousine service C D Stith president gave his employes both paychecks and beef roasts Saturday in recognition he said of the efforts put forth in establishing the transportation service 1 Dead 2 Injured in Iowa Auto Accident Davenport person is dead and two others injured as a result of a headon automobile collision near Walcott Scott County Coroner Frank Keppy said Monday Miss Hamona Klatt 20 of Waverly died in a hospital Mon day Coroner Keepy said she was riding in acar with W E Fritz 26 of McGregor when the auto collided with one driven by Rob ert Moldenschardt 21 of Daven port U S Bidding for LendLease Settlement With Russians Washington United States will reserve the right to re capture all weapons and munitions supplied Russia under lendlease before writing the wartime account closed government officials said Monday These officials noted that such recaptured provisions have been written into the lendlease settlements concluded with 7 other coun tries And they add that they no reason why American policy on this matter would be changed for the Soviets It is not clear when negotiations to settle the Russian account will get underway A note to Moscow some weeks ago suggesting that a mission be sent here for the pur pose reportedly has gone un answered Officials say that in general this country does not expect to exer cise its right in any country to regain possession of items like guns planes and tanks but that the recapture clause was inserted as a precautionary measure The great bulk of the 000000 in lendlease goods fur nished the Russians falls into the strictly war goods category The American officials who will sit in on the settlement discus sions with the Soviets said they do not think the United States will seek payment for any war mate rial destroyed or otherwise used up in the war against the Germans and Japanese Officials declined to estimate the amount of the final soviet obliga tion They pointed out however that Britain was billed for 000000 and France for 000 when they settled their lend lease accounts But part of these sums went to pay for surplus property those countries wanted to buy outright Britain was allowed 50 years to pay France 35 years and Russia presumably also would be granted a longterm credit Britain received more than 530000000000 in American lend leasc compared with Russias 000000000 share and Frances 32377000000 Under reverse lendlease Brit ain was credited with about 500000000 France with 000 and Russia Countries that have settled their accounts with the United States in addition to England and France are Australia New Zealand India Turkey and Belgium Similar con versations are under way with South Africa the Netherlands and Norway MAN JAILED ON DRAFT EVASION Jehovahs Witness in Custody in Minnesota Fairmont Minn UP U S marshal expected Monday to tak into custody Lloyd R Wilson 29 a member of Jehovahs Witnesses wanted for trial on draft evasion Wilson was held in the county jail here after Police Chief Henry Plenge arrested him Saturday The prisoner was indicted in St Paul last year in September by federal grand jury He failed t report for induction in Owatonna May 29 1945 Wilson was released on bond pending trial in Winona bu failed to appear for trial Jackson and Black on Speaking Terms Washington Com Justices Jackson and tral figures in a bitter behindthe scenes on speakin terms Although they did not so muc as look at each other in their firs public appearance last Monday i the courtroom it was learne Monday the ice was broken whe they came face to face in tK closelyguarded corridor just out side their adjoining offices Jackson was the first to spea as they approached each other Good morning Hugo Jackso said Good morning Jackson Blac responded Paris The ministry of the nterior announced Monday that le electorate in Sundays referen um had approved the proposed onstitution for Frances 4th Te ublic by more than 1180000 otes This approval came despite the pposition of Gen Charles DC jaulle the nations wartime Icad r who charged that the document rafted by the constituent assem ly would create a France too veak to maintain its independence n a struggle between the cast and vest between Russia and the United States as he portrayed it Further De Gaulle contended hat the document did not give nough authority to the executive ead of the new republic and did ot provide enough separation be ween the legislative executive nd judicial branches of the gov rnment According to the ministrys an nouncement 538 of the voters pproved the charter which had he backing of Frances 3 major political the MRP social sts and communists Only the adical socialists and the smal ightist parties presented organ zed opposition In 80 of Frances confinenta departments the ministrys figurC howcd the vote was 8256308 in avor of the constitution and 7 175651 against The 80 departments referred to n the ministrys figures have a olal of 22544226 registered oters but only 15331959 voted Many observers felt that the new charter while adopted los leavily in moral weight through he fact that so many people ig nored the referendum With approval of the constilu ion the voters now will choosi a permanent assembly on Nov 1 a mbve which will mean tha Trances government is shifting Over from its present provisiona status toiaipermanent prganiza lion Sundays referendum marke the 2nd time the Frenchhad volei on a constitution drawn up by th constituent assembly Voters re iectcd a proposed constitution las May by a majority of more than 1000000 The constitution provides for The election of a president by i joint session of the parliament fo 7year term reelection onlj once A parliament composed of a na tional assembly of deputies lecteej for 5year terms byuni versal suffrage and a council o the republic chosen by an elec Loral college whose electors woul be mayors municipal and cantona officials The national assembly will hav the sole power to make the law while the council of the republi can only recommend legislation The president will have no pow er of veto over the assembly bu may suggest changes in bills al ready passed The premier will b nominated by the president sub ject to endorsement by the as iembly Two additional legislativ groups will be established Bot will be restricted to consultati rolls They are the council of th federal union set up to administe the affairs of Frances colonie and the economic council Oil companies expect to pass out 150 million road maps this summer Injuries Fatal Council Bluffs b a motor car on an adjacent trac as he stepped from between 2 lo comotives he was coupling James J Hervert 34 Omaha Union Pa cific brakeman was injured fatal ly here Sunday Housewives Line Up for 10000 Pounds ot Buffalo Meat Minneapolis UR Thick red steaks and from grain fed buffalo across the counter Monday to meathungry housewives at the rate of 35 pounds per minute There was no quibbling about the price Customers wanted meat and the mountains of freshlycut steaks brought out a glow in their eyes A crew of 17 butchers worked at top speeds when the doors opened to admit the hopeful hun gry buyers Many of the custom ers had stood in line for 4 hours at the suburban market of the 2 shops selling 10000 pounds of the buffalo meat Switchboards of the market were jammed by regular customers placing their orders by telephone In the first 90 minutes the shop was open 3200 pounds of meat were sold according to Warren Witt the manager He experienced no trouble with the crowds at the shop that opened at a m CST but admitted he had qualms about the crowd forming in front of the downtown store which was to open at noon The blocklong line in front of the downtown store was the target of all the activity of a movie pre miere Newspaper reporters and radio announcers moved along the line questioning customers and in terviewing them Flash bulbs popped at frequent intervals Police had little trouble with the customers outside the store and several moved inside to keep the lines moving in front of the meat counters First purchases in dicated that the customers wanted only samples the average sale estimated at about 3 pounds a customer No rationing was necessary and 1 man took 12 porterhouse steaks for a party while Frank Mc Cormick University of Minnesota athletic director took 25 worth of assorted cuts A telegraphed order from Cleve land for a dozen steaks was turned down because the sale was on an acrossthecounter first come first served basis Buffaloburger was going fast at a pound sirloins at a pound roasts at 75 cents and por terhouse steaks at a pound The choice grainfed bison cut from 33 animals was disposed of on a first come first served basis to continue as long as the supply held out Butchers worked for days in advance of the sale cutting slabs of the meat into prime roasts pot roasts suc culent club porterhouse rib and cube steaks Prices ranged up to S175 per pound for choice crown nearly 2J times the ceiling on top graded beef There is no OPA ceiling on buffalo a luxury prod uct Witt who says bison has a flavor very similar to beef tried out buffalo burgers on his cus tomers last week and they came back clamoring for more We hadnt planned any limit to customers Witt said in ad vance of the sale But some form of rationing may have to be put into effect if the crowd gets too big so that as many as possible get their share Witt based his estimate of 5 000 customers on the number of telephone calls received and said that even on normal days in re cent weeks weve had 2000 or more customers mobbing the store when word got out that meat was available Weather Report FORECAST Mason City Partly cloudy Mon day night becoming mostly cloudy with showery weather Tuesday Cooler Tuesday night Iowa Fair Monday night Tues day becoming cloudy with showers Cooler in west portion Tuesday afternoon Low Mon day night 38 to 45 High Tues day 60 to 65 west and 65 to 70 east Minnesota Increasing cloudiness and a little warmer Monday night with showers in northwest portion Tuesday cloudy and colder with rain south and rain changing to snow north portion IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics for 24 hour period ending at B oclock Monday morning Maximum 58 Minimum 38 At 8 a m Monday 41 YEAR AGO Maximum 60 Minimum 38 GlobeGazette weather statistics for 24 hour period ending at 8 oclock Sunday morning Maximum 45 Minimum 32 At 8 a m Sunday 38 YEAR AGO Maximum 59 Minimum 25 MOLOTOV SAYS MANY ACTIONS NEED CHANGING Ministers Council to Take Up Germany Treaty in New York Paris Paris peace con erence accused by Russia of ailure in many respects wound up work Monday night on five peace treaties and the foreign ninisters council prepared to take up in New York the completion of hese pacts and a start on the new reaty with Germany herself In the last hour of the peace conference Soviet Foreign Minister V M Molotov protested that many of its acts had been unsatisfactory and would have to be gone over iy the foreign ministers One of the conferences last actions was to vote down an American appeal to reduce Fin pnds reparations by onethird Russia protested that and said the United States had dominated the 11week conference An American spokesman said the foreign ministers would meet Nov 4 in New York to complete work on the treaties with Italy Romania Hungary Bulgaria and Finland and begin work on the pact which will decide the future of Germany The spokesman indicated the treaty with Germany would not be completed in New York since oth Molotov and French Presi dent Georges Bidault preferred that it be designed in Europe Molotov will leave for New York Tuesday and Secretary of State Byrnes will follow Wednes day to attend the meeting of the United Nations assembly conven ing Oct 23 V M Molotov Russian foreign minister angrily charged that the United States had dominated the 11week session His speedxindi cated a reopening of certain de cisions when he sits with his American British and French colleagues in New York to de cide finally on terms He denounced the decisions on Trieste free navigation of the Danube and the BulgarianGreek border The treaty draft for Finland was adopted after numerous ob jections of the United States in cluding demurrers to the 000000 reparations which the American tried unsuccessfully to cut by a 3rd The United States abstained from voting to cede the icefree Arctic port of Petsamo to Russia and was beaten in opposing a mo tion to make Finland pay three fourths of the property damages in Finland to United Nations prop erties Molotov charging that the United States had dominated the conference upheld the Soviet Unions right to 5300000000 rep arations from figure soon at tcrward ratified over United States opposition voiced by Senator Arthur H Vandenbergr The Michigan senator sought to re duce the reparations figure to 5200000000 but the conference voted this down 11 to 5 Molotov remarked that only por ions the draft treaties with Italy Romania Bulgaria Hun gary and Finland pleased Russia and indicated that many of the ssues would be thrown back into h e foreign ministers council where decisions must be unani mous He accused the United States reat Britain and France of vio atingjheir agreements and re xeating from 4power accord in jie adoption of a number of anti democratic measures in connec lion with Trieste He spoke critically of guarantees written into Balkan treaties for free navigation of the Danube and complained that the confer ence had refused to fix Bulgarian boundaries as of January an action that would have given Bulgaria some territory from Greece COURT REJECTS BILBO OUSTER Washington supreme court Monday rejected a request that it bar Senator Bilbo DMiss from his senate seat The request was made by James L P Humbler New York City who told the coort that Bilbo had deprived Mississippi citizens of the right to vote because of their color and racial origins The application noted that the constitution makes each house of congress the judge of the qualifi cations of its members Rumbler added that the constitution has not clothed cither of the houses with power of being the exclusive judges of the elections of mem bers   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 145+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication