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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: October 10, 1946 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - October 10, 1946, Mason City, Iowa                                NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME THE NT i I A THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS HOME EDITION VOL un Associated Press and United Press Full Leased Wlxef Five Cents a MASON CITY IOWA THURSDAY OCTOBER 10 1946 This Paper Consists of Two One No 1 DENY CLEMENCY APPEALS OF NAZIS Cards Lead in 4th World Series Tilt SCORE BY INNINGS 1 f 3 4 5 6 78 9 R H StLouis 0 H H ID D H D E I Boston QQ LH DQ Q LD S I Hughson Hammered From Hill by Redbird Sluggers Boston vicious batting spree by the St Louis Cardinals sent Tex Hughson ace Red Sox righthander to the showers in the 4th game of the World Series here Thursday as the Cards collected 4 hits in the 1st 7 innings to take an 81 lead FIRST INNING Cardinals The 1st pitch to Schoendienst was a called strike Schpendienst then proceeded to bounce out to York unassisted Moore ran the count to 3 and 2 then popped to Doerr Musia bounced out Doerr to York No runs no hits no errors none left Red Sox Moses hit the Is pitch arid flied to Moore in center Pesky flied to Walker in left Slaughter raced over to the righ field foul line to make a nice run ning catch of DiMaggios drive No runs no hits no errors none left SECOND INNING Cardinals With a full count on him Slaughter connected with a fast ball and sent it into the right field stands about 370 feet away for a homerun to put the Cards ahead 10It was the 1st St Louis run in 14 innings Kurowski linet a double off the left field wall barely beating Williams throw to Pesky Garagiola flied to DiMag gio in center Kurowski holding 2nd Walker lined a singleinto right field Kurowski easily scor ing with the Cards 2nd run Walk er attempted to steal 2nd but Catcher H Wagner apparently catching the signal called for a pitchout and threw to Pesky a1 2ndWalkercaught midway be tween the bases scrambled back to 1st and when Pesky threw the ball wild out Umpire Ballanfaht sent Walk er to 3rd Pesky was charged with ah error on the playMarion sacrificed Walker1 home with a squeeze bunt Doerr throwingto York at1st for the putout Mun ger struck out swinging Three run 3 hits 1 error none left Bed Sox With Williams at bat the Cardinals used a different type of shift as they had been doing in previous games Marion switched from his shortstop posi tion to 2nd base Schoendienst moved closer to 1st and back on the grass but Kurowski remained at 3rd Williams ran the count to 3 and 2 and then drew a walk Terry moore made a diving catch of Yorks terrific smash to right center and Williams had to scramble back to 1st to avoid be ing doubled up Doerr flied to Slaughter near the right field stands Slaughter raced into right center and hauled in Higgins long drive No runs no hits no errors 1 left THIRD INNING Cardinals Schoendienst lined a single into center field Moore sacrificed Schoendienst to 2nd but when Hughson 1st fumbled his bunt then threw wild to 1st Schoendienst raced to 3rd and Moore continued on to 2nd Musial rammed a double to rightcenter field scoring Schoendienst and Moore increasing the Cardinals lead to 50 Jim Bagby a right hander replaced Hughson on the mound Doerr backed up on the grass to field Slaughters ground Ill er and threw him outMusiaTgo j ing to 3rd Kurowski fouled to York Red Sox dugout I Garagiola singled to center scor ing Musial withthe 3rd run of 1 the inningand Si Louis 6th run of struck out missing a 3 and 2 Three J3 runs 3 hits lcrror 1 left Ked SoxH Wagner grounded l to Schoeriaienst and was aneasy out Moore stoodin his tracks to J gather in Bagbys hoist Moses singled into right field for his 1st hit of the series Pesky went down swinging No runs 1 hit no er rors lleft I FOURTH INNING Cardinals After fouling off 5 pitches Marion singled over the shortstops head into left field Hunger sacrificed Bagby to Doerr 3 who covered 1st Schoendienst flied to DiMaggio in short center Marion holding 2iid Moore flied deep to DiMaggio No runs 1 hit no errors 1 Red Sox Schoendienst grabbed DiMaggios grounder and threw him out Williams lined a single over the heads of Marion and Schoendienst field York walloped the 1st pitch into deep rightcenter field for a double scoring Williams with the 1st Red Sox run making the score 61 It was Yorks 5th RBI of the series Doerr walked on a 3 and 2 pitch Higgins hit a 3 and 2 pitch and flied to Walker in short left field The runners held their bases Munser caueht York asleep off 2nd base bu threw wide to Marion and York scrambled back to safety Slaugh ter fast to gobble up H Wagners short fly to right One run 2 hits no errors Z left FIFTH INNING Cardinals Musial sent a ter rific liner right into Higgins glove Slaughter doubled agains the left field wall Kurowski rattled the left field wall with a double scoring Slaughter Gara giola singled into center but Ku rowski was out at the plate on a fine throw by DiMaggio from center field H Wagner helped make the play possible with a lungingtag of the sliding Kurow ski Garagiola ran to 2nd on the throw to the plate Walkes was purposely passed Marion singled to left but Williams perfect peg on 1 bounce to Wagner caught Garagiola at the plate One run 4 hits no errors 2 left Red Sox Metkovich a left handed hitter batted for Bagby Metkovich flied to Walker who had to come in fast to make the catch Moses singled sharplyinto center Musialmade a leaping gloyedhand catch of Peskys wicked liner and narrowly missed doubling up Moses who slid back to1st under the tag DiMaggio popped to Marion No runs 1 hit no errors 1 left SIXTH INNING Cardinals Bill Zuber went in to pitch for the Red Sox Munger watched a 3rd strike breeze by Higgiris made a nice catch of Schbehdiensts foul close to the Cardinal dugout Moore flied to Moses in short right No runs no hits no errors none left Red Sox Williams rolled out to Schoendienst York walked on 5 pitches Doerr grounded a single through the hole between 3rd and short into left field sending York to 2nd 6nce again Al Brazle be gan warming up in the Cards bullpen Biggins shot a single past Kurowski into left field but Walkers fast return forced York to stop at 3rd and the bases were filled H Walker flied to Slaugh ter in deep right York tried to score from 3rd after the catch but was out at the plate when Slaugh er uncorked a tremendous heave 0 Garagiola No runs 2 hits no errors 2 left Southwest Nebraska Farms Hit by Flood Oxford Nebr to its iiighest level since the disastrous 1935 flood the Republican river Thursday widened to almost a mile here and caused serious dam age to farmlands in southwest Ne braska The flood waters tore out the south span of the bridge over the river here and traffic over Re publican river bridges at Orleans Sdison Arapahoe and Cambridge has been halted Mayor K CDill man said Torrential rains upstream rang ng up to 6 and 7inches were responsible for the high water The mayor said constant rains in recent days also had soaked the round to such an extent that all of recent rains ran off Oxford itself is on high ground jut many acres of farmland along he river undoubtedlyare being looded Dillman saidjjarm homes along the river were washed away in 1935 were never rebuilt Six to 7 inches of rain have fallen here in the last week Burned Wreckage f Plane in Lolo Land Sichang China search ilane Wednesday located Ihe mrned wreckage of a Chinese Na ional Airways transport plane in he wild Lolo country 20 miles southwest of Sichang It was be ieved the American pilot and the 1 Chinese aboard may have per shed Earlier accounts coming out of he country of the fierce tribes men of Chinas far west said all aboard were safe but in the cus ody of the Lolos The transport crashed Sept 20 The Chinese Airways was or ganizing a party to go to the cene high up on 14400foot Lochi mountain CAMPUS Van Arsdel atop statue of In dianapolis getsa trim from classmate Paul Wilson of Co lumbus Ohio as Purdue university students protest hike of haircut prices from 75 centsto AP Wirephoto Women Trouble Snags Male Student Strike on Haircuts Infl strike by a group of Purdue university students against a 25 cent hike in the price of haircuts ran into women trouble Thursday Sorority coeds began boycotting long laired students Union barbers were picketed Wednesday by irate male students in automobiles and an airplane droppedleaflets attacking the price oost The barbers prepared an appeal to Gov Ralph Gates against tactics reminiscent of the nazi youth movement They said their il a haircut business had been cut 60 per cent as a result of the demonstrations Sorority women threatened to halt the campaign however by saying they wouldnt date any boy with long hair I dont see any excuse for the strike said one tall svelte blond at the Kappa Kappa Samma house Other cities charge for haircuts Why look sloppy ust to save 25 cents But UniversityPresident Frederick L Hovde stuck by the strikers even if some of the coeds wouldnt He said the boycott was only natural after such a big boost in prices Hovde said there was no evidence for reports from barbers of attempted violence or intimidation on the part of students toward arber shop customers The students had protested orally and in an appropriate manner he said The strikers claimed to have signed pledges from 2500 students o remain unshorn until haircut prices are lowered to 75 cents OPA Boosts Retail Prices of Top Veal Grades 78 Cents Thurs day boosted retail prices of top grades of veal by 7 to 8 cents a ound The increases are effective Oct 14 Only the two top choice and affected OPA announced at the same ime that ceilings on all other lamb have been recalculated according o storegroups Posters announc ing these new prices will appear in tores on Oct 14 The recalculations will mean iccasional increases of a cent or wo and some decreases of a like amount on other cuts OPA said These adjustments and the veal increase have little to do with the genera meatcrisis OPA said the veal boost was authorized to prevent hardship to laughterers who kill a large per entage of calves in comparison with the volume of full grown attle Present market prices for ive calves give veal slaughterers rofit margins that are greatly be ow returns for beef The new higher retail price of reflects wholesale ceiling loosts that become effective hursday The wholesale increase or whole veal carcasses amounts o per hundred pounds on hoice grades and on good rades Veal forequarters go up at wholesale by psr hundred iounds for choice and on jood Choice andgood veal hind quarters are up by and espectively OPA said all veal cuts in the wo top grades are affected by the ncrease with the exception of idneys ground veal patties neck iones and certain boneless veal terns r Dreamboat to Germany Frankfurt Germany 129 Pacusan Dreamboat will fly iday from Cairo Egypt to Viesbaden Germany headquar ers of the U S air forces in urope announced Thursday Ku Klux Klan Members Outlawed in New Jersey Trenton N J ff The Ku Klux Klan was Thursday outlawed in New Jersey as an organization destructive of the rights of liber ties of the people Supreme Court Justice A Day ton Oliphant issueda judgment of ouster Slight Improvement Condition Washington IP but definite improvement in the con dition of former Secretary Of State CordellHull was reported Thurs day by Bethesda naval hospital Des Draft Head Leaves Moines Frank Cannon of Sioux City supervisor of the appeals and classification sectionof Iowa selective service headquarters is being mustered out of service this week reducing to four the number of officers in state headauarters BEEF INDUSTRY PLEDGES MEAT IF CURB LIFTED Committee Formally Petitions for Removal of Meat Price Controls Washington beef in dustrycoupled a demand for im mediate scrapping of price con trols Thursday with a promise of ample supplies of meat very soon before Novembers con gressional the admin istration acts R G Haynje chairman of the OF A beef industry advisory com mittee which petitioned formally for decontrol told reporters there are plenty of cattle and calves ready for market as soon as price ceilings are lifted The white house scene of a spe cial round of toplevel conferences of thr situation late Wednesday remained silent The beef industrys decontrol petition filed with Secretary of Agriculture Anderson took sharp issue with the presidents conten tion that there was a heavy slaughter of meat during July and August when controls were tem porarily off Apparently the circuwstances that have induced this erroneous belief is the fact that these cattle moved to market were slaughtered and the meat sold during normal and legitimate channels the peti tion said Many months prior to July great numbers of cat tle and calves were purchased by black market operators at the farm and auction markets and elsewhere which escaped this no tice of governmental agencies The petition argued that there is no shortage of cattle and calves under the meaning of the price control act and said Under these conditions congress nas ordered decontrol in order that the law of supply and demand be permitted to function Whether prices would rise after decontrol is wholly imma terial Signs multiplied Thursday that e government might welcome Argentine beef to Americas meat ess dinner tables as a lever to pry homebred cattle off western ranges With the meat controversy boil ng at peak amid forecasts of emergency action by President Truman within a few Argentine ambassador Oscar Ivanissevich said he is ready to offer Argentinas help o combat the shortage One of the worlds largest meat exporters Argentina for years has been prohibited from shipping meat to the United States on the round that hoof and mouth dis ease is prevalent among Argen ine cattle However an aide to the ambas sador told a reporter this is no issue now because the meat Ar entina will offer is boneless and canned He said there is about 4000000 pounds available for im mediate shipment to thisctmntry Of Argentinas total supply of iresh meat he said about 70 per cent goes to Great Britain Indict Georgia Farmer for Holding 5 Negroes Atlanta early trial was indicated Thursday for Roswell Pierce Biggers wealthy 65 year old farmer indicted by a federal jrand jury on a charge that he1 aeld 5 Negroes in involuntary servitude on his 3000 acre farm near here The 19 count indictment re urned Wednesday charged that Biggers forced the Negroes to perform labor in payment of a debt ADVERTISING Jahr 18 lettering a sign on the window of his fathers grocery store to advertise butter at a pound in Minneapolis Minn and added the comment now is the time to quit using butter1 AP Wirephoto Russians Clamp Down Aerial Traffic Ban on Balkan Skies London authorif ties imposed abanonflights over the Balkans Thursday throwing U S army officials into a state of secrecy and confusionthat ob themotive behind the ac tion TKe reason for the air ban came from Washing ton Military and diplomatic sources there believed it was prompted by troop movements and maneuvers in the Balkans Soon after U S headquarters at frankfurt had confirmed the clos ing of the Eomania rlungary and Czechoslovakiato ioreign planes Gen Joseph T VIcNarneys office announced that Sights could be resumed over Czechoslovakia Another brief interval elapsed and the same office said that the orders against flying over Hun ary had been countermanded That left only Romania The tight curtain of secrecy cast ibout the situation was main tained in Europe No explana ion was the retort to requests or clarification of the Russian ac ion at Frankfurt Berlin Prague and elsewhere The only immediate clue to the sudden blackout of the Balkan skies by the Soviets came from Washington There a diplomatic source reported that the Russians were conductingtroop maneuvers n western Hungary and live am munition was being used Recalling that a like ban was imposed on the Balkan air lanes some 9 months ajro when troops were movedto the western Bal ans military sources in Wash believed another shift might be going on None in Frankfurt admitted laving any explanation for the mposition of the aerial ban Re liable sources suggested that the answer would have to comefrom Washington A Pan American Airways clip per turned back from Vienna can jelling its scheduled flight on to rague The company announced t was terminating its transAtlan tic flights at Brussels until the or ders shutting off the air lanes over sovietdominated areas was clari Hunter Killed Leon C Baker 86 was shot and killed accidentally while mnting Tuesday when he at empted to crawl through a fence and a shell fromhis shotgun went ihrpugh his heart Tail of Comet Puts On Big World Show By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Most of the United States was treated to a spectacular display of shooting stars Wednesday night as meteors shed by the comet Gia cobinizinner burned across the skies in what some scientists said was the most brilliant exhibition seen in America this century But dense clouds marred or completely obliterated the view for many watchers of the skies in some sections of the country Although clouds interfered with the view in some places in Iowa thousands witnessed the display At Des Moines clouds obscured he view during the early part of the period but they broke shortly after 9 p m and the meteorites could be seen flashing Dr Basil E Gillam Drake uni versity professor of mathematics who rushed Boy Scouts to the roof of the Waveland municipal ob servatory to help count said they marked an average of 15 a min ute during a halfhour period Scientists used radar and for the first recorded time reported they saw a display of meteors be yond fog and clouds Observers from the national bureau of standards in Washington said they were sure that pips appearing on the radar screen represented meteors about 50 miles from earth Other scientists boarded air planes to get above thick clouds for a glimpse of the aerial fire works and Harvard astronomers in an aerial planetarium re ported seeing meteors at the rate of about 17 per minute The display resulted as the earth came within 131000 miles of the spot in space through which the comet passed 8 days ago The meteors were shed by the comet and formed part of its tail Those seen on the earth were those caught by the earths gravi tational pull and consumed for the most part as they plunged through the earths air shell the friction between the solid matter and the air causing the brilliant burning U S Chamber of Red Party Washington IP The United States Chamber of Commerce de manded Thursday that congress rip the lid off the communist party to end its power and influ ence in labors ranks and within the government itself Declaring that communists still are operating under an interna tional Comintern bent upon world conquest the organization added that because the party thrives upon deceit and is loyal to a hostile foreign power it should be forced by law to reveal its membership sources of money and all its activities The chambers lengthy report based on yearlong investigation by a special committee on social ism and communism that communists have succeeded in driving many faithful public servants from the government It declared too that red infil tration into the government has been particularlymarked in both the treasury arid labor depart ments A treasury spokesman quickly retorted that the department nat urally has no comment on so gen eral astatement However Secretary of Labor Schwellenbach said that charges of subversive activity had been brought by the FBI against a number of labor department em ployes and that an investigation has been underway for several days Five cases already have been studied and 2 others are set for inquiry On the labor front the chamber declared that while the late Sid ney Hillman was not a communist nor isCIOPresident PhilipMur raj 2 of their top advisers are communists taking direct and fre quent orders on PAC policy from the verytop level of the commun ist party The advisers were not named The report was made public at a news conference late Wednes day which developed into one of the most sessions of its kind here in recent months Francis P Matthews Omaha lawyer and chairman pf the Cham bers special committee consistent ly refused to discuss the sources of information which formed the basis for the report Colder Weather Due in Northwest Iowa By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Colderweather was forecast for Iowa Thursday night with freez ing temperatures in the northwest by Saturday and a heavy to killing frost throughout the state by Sat urday morning Low temperatures Thursday night will range from 30 to 34 in the northwest to 40 in the extreme east The annual tuna pack worth is Americas most val uable fishery WAR CRIMINALS MEET HANGMAN ON WEDNESDAY Council Rejects Pleas of Goering Keitel Jodl for Firing Squad Berlin allied control council Thursday night denied all he clemency appeals it received from the nazi war criminals seal ing the doom of those scheduled to died on the gallows next Wednes day In blanket rejection of the ap peals the council denied those on behalf of 11 nazi leaders sentenced todeath and refused to reduce the prison terms of 5 others The 4power council was the last recourse of the nazis con victed at Nuernberg Thus the re fusal of the appeals crushed the last hope of the war criminals for any reduction of sentence The council specifically rejected the pleas of Herman Goering Al fred Jodl and Wilhelm Keitel to be shot rather than subjected to the more ignominous death on the gallows A plea by the aged Erich Raeder to be shot instead of put in prison for life was turned down The announcement of the coun cils findings after a 2day meet ing to consider the appeals did not say when the condemned nazis would drop through the gallows trap All official word heretofore however had been that next Wed nesday would be hanging day at the Nuernberg prison Ernst Kaltenbrunner former head of the German security and criminal police was the only one of the 12 condemned nazis for whom no appeal was filed A rou tine appeal was filed even for the missing Martin Bormann the only one of the 12 who will escape the gallows next week The pleas for the geslapo the SS or eliteguard and the SD or police division were rejected since the council said it could not re consider the judgment of the in ternational tribunal but only was empowered to grant clemency Marshal Vassily D Sokolovsky Russian member of the council concluded the 5i hours of deliber ation with a restatement of the so viet dissent from the verdicts in the cases of Rudolf Hess who got a life term and Hjalmar Schacht Hans Fritzsche and Franz von Pa pen who were acquitted Gen Joseph Stilwell Is Critically 111 San Francisco Joseph W Stilwell 63 6th army com mander and famed Burma cam paigner lay critically ill in Let terman generalhospital Thursday The army announced that Stil well was suffering from a liver condition believed contracted dur ing fighting early in the war The general entered Letter man general hospital Sept 28 for a checkup and underwent a major operation Oct 3 His progress was satisfactory until late Wednesday when he took a turn for the worse The latest U S census listed 10000000 adults as almost UUter ate Of these 3000000 never had attended school Weather Report FORECAST Mason City Mostly cloudy with occasional showers Thursday night Clearing Friday morning Fair and much cooler Friday night with heavy to killing frost Saturday morning Iowa Cloudy and much cooler Thursday night with showers early Thursday night in east Freezing temperatures in north west by Friday Clearing east and central portions with heavy to killing frost Saturday morn ing throughout state Low Thursday night 3034 northwest to 40 extreme east High Friday from 5055 west to 5560 in east Minnesota Cloudy Showers north and extreme east Thursday night changing to snow flurries over most north Much cool er with freeziing temperatures by Friday morning north and west Partly cloudy and cool Friday Fairly hard freeze north and killing frost south Satur day morning IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics for 24 hour period ending at 8 oclock Thursday morning Maximum 67 Minimum 54 At 8 a m Thursday 54 Precipitation 103 YEAR AGO Maximum 52 Minimum 39   

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