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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: October 3, 1946 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - October 3, 1946, Mason City, Iowa                                NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME ARCHIVES THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS HOME EDITION Ullltf VOL ad Unflea Press Full Leased Will Five Cents a Copyl MASON CITY IOWA THURSDAY OCTOBER 3 This Piper Consists at Two One No 306 9 DEAD IN 2ND AIRLINER CRASH Cardinals Lead Bums 61 Into 8th Inning of Playoff SCORE BY INNINGS 23 45678 9 R H E StLouis H Brklyn H Brooklyn St Louis Cardinals unleashed a strong attack at the plate in cluding 3 triples to take a 61 going into the 8th in ning of the2nd playoff game with the Brooklyn Dodgers for the National league pen nant FIRST INNING Cardinals Schoendienst grounded out to Hatten Moore lined a single to left on the 1st pitch Hank Behrman right hand er was already warming up for the DodgersFurillo made a fine running catch of Musials drive to right center and Moore just got back to 1st to prevent a double play Kurowski raised a high fly to Furillo in short center No runs one hit no errors one left fannecTStanky on 3 pitches but when Kluttz dropped the 3rd strike Stanky ran toward 1st but was out Kluttzto Musial Whitman grounded out Schoendienst to Musial Galan was credited with a single when he outfooted a high bounder past the mound on which Schoendienst made a nice stop but threw badly to 1st F Walker walked on 4 straight pitches Stevens rammed a single through Dicksons legs into center field scoring Galan and sending F Walker to 2nd Moore romped into right center to pull in JTurillos long fly One run 2 hits no errors 2 left SECOND INNING Cardinals Galan threw out Slaughter Dusak smashed a line drive to left field which Whitman touched but failed to hold Dusak going all the way to 3rd The protested dons decision but toi no avail Rusakwas Marionlifted to Furilloin medium center but Dusak beat Furillos throw to tie the score Kluttz whistled a single into center Dickson lined a triple to the right field wall to score Kluttz with the run that put the Cards ahead 21 Schoendienst popped to Stevens Two runs 3 hits no errors one left called out on strikes and again Kluttz dropped the ball and had to throw to Musial for the putout Edwards walked on 5 pitches Hatten at tempting to sacrifice bunted sharply to Dickson who threw to Marion at 2nd base to force Ed wards Dickson also took Stankys bounder and threw him out No runs no Bits no errors one left THIRD INNING grounded out Stanky to Stevens Stanky also scooped up Musials hot grounder and threw him but KurOwski worked the count to 3 and 2 and then walked Whitman came in fast for Slaughters high pop in back of short No runs no hits no errors one left camped under Whitmans high pop inback of 2nd base Musial took Galans grounder and steppgd on 1st for the out Kurowski caught F Walkers foul near the 3rd base stands No runs no hits no errors none left FOURTH INNING Cardinals Galan whipped out Dusak on a fast play Marion worked the count to 3 and 2 and walked After Hatten threw 3 straight balls to Kluttz Left Hand er Vic Lombardi left the Dodger dugout for the bull pen Hatten then threw over 2 strikes and got Kiuttz on a high fly to Whitman in left Reese raced in back of 3rd to make a splendid stop of Dick sons slow roller and with a per fect underhand toss to Stanky forced Martin at 2nd No runs no hits no errors one left hauled in Ste vens fly near the left field foul line Furillo popped weakly to Marion just behind the mound Kurowski backed up for Reeses sharp grounder and made a long throw to 1st for the out No runs no hits no errors none left FIFTH INNING filed to Furillo Moore popped to Reese Musial doubled against the right field fence Kurowski was pur posely passed Slaughter tripled tc deep right center scoring Musia and Kurowski Dusak bounced single past Hatten scoring Slaugh ter Behrman went in to pitch for Brooklyn Marion singled to cen ter sending Dusak to 3rd Kluttz flied to Walker Three runs 4 hits no errors 2 left Dodgers Edwards walked for the 2nd time Hermanski a left BYRNES ECHOES STALIN WAR IS NOT IMMINENT Decries Charge U S Using Atom Threat Against Soviet Union Paris Secretary of State James F Byrnes declared Thurs day that the conflict of view joints among the allies is serious iut he echoed a recent statement jy Prime Minister Stalin that here is no immediate danger of war Byrnes spoke at a luncheon of he American club in Paris After every great war which las been won by the combined ef orts of many nations there has icen a conflict among the allies in the making peace Byrnes said It would be folly to deny he seriousness of the conflict in viewpoints among the allies after his war To ignore conflict or min imize its seriousness will not solve the conflict nor help the road to peace To exaggerate that conflict and ts seriousness on the other band only makes more difficult the res olution of the conflict S concur most heartily in the view recently expressed by Gen eralissimo Stalin that there is no mmediate danger of war I hope hat his statement willput an end a thetmwarrantedcharges that any nation or groupof nations is seeking to encircle the Soviet Union or that the responsible leaders of the Soviet Union so be He added the hope that Stalins words would dispel the unwar ranted charges that the United States is seeking touse its posses sion of the atomic bomb as a threat of forceagainst the Soviet BELMONT RADIO BIDS ON HEMP PLANT WAA to Decide on Within 10 Days Acre Bid on Land Anoffer of by the Bel niont Radio corporation was the ligh bid for the Mason City hemp Dlarit at Chicago Thursday the war assets administration an lounced In addition to a bid for ilatft and the 10acre tract on which it is situated the radio oncern offered an additional 100 for equipment and personal property Laurence K Marshall president if the corporation in a letter ac nmpanying the bid said the property would be used for man ufacture of radio receiving sets aarts and communications equip ment and about 300 persons in cluding over 200 women would e employed A bid was presented by he Mason City Development as sociation on behalf of Joseph Veidenhoff Inc a subsidiary of Bowser Inc of Fort Wayne Ind a manufacturer of electrical test ng and service equipment Harvey J Bryant president and John Johnson secretary treasurer of the Mason City De velopment association were in Chicago to present the bid by that organization Other bids were per acre for 30 acres by E A and E F Thrams of Ma son City per acre for 30 acres by Arthur Lehman Mason 3ity for metal parts of kilns by the Eli Colby company of Ranlpntown WilliamT Kirby deputy re gional directprof the JiKAA jstajed a on the bids would be made in Chicago within 10 busi nessdays This is the 2nd time bids have been received for the plant Union However Byrnes said Ameri canforeign policy will continue to follow a strong line Just because war is not now imminent we must take the great est care not to plant the seeds of a future war We must seek less to defend our actions in the eyes of those who agree with us and more to defend our actions in the eyes of those who do not agree with us The secretary declared his be lief that nobody wants war today but he said decrying it is no1 enough The difficultyis that while no nation wants war nations may pursue policies or courses of ac tion whichlead to war Nations may seek political and economic advantages which they cannot ob tain without war Byrnes de clared illC illU 11111 C handed batter swung for man Dickson hooked over a curve ball which Hermanski took for a 3rd called strikes Stanky hit into a double play Dickson to Marion to Musial No runs no hits no errors none left SIXTH INNING Lombardi went to the mound to pitch the 6th in ning Reese knocked down Dick sons hot smash but the Cardina pitcher beat the throw to 1st base for a single Schoendienst sacri ficed Dickson to 2nd Stanky threw out Moore Dickson moving to 3rd Lombardi tossed out Musial No runs one hit no errors one left Dodgers Dickson tossed bu Whitman who swung on the Isi pitch Galan also swung at the Is pitch and he too hit back toDick son who threw him out Schoen dienst tossed out F Walker No runs no hits no errors none left SEVENTH INNING Cardinals Kurowski and Slaughter Dusak sacri ficed Galan to Stevens Kurowsk going to 3rd and Slaughter to 2nd Higbe went in to pitch for Brook lyn Marion squeezed home Ku rowski wit haiperfqct bunt Higbi tagging Marion out unassisted Slaughter going to 3rd Galan threw out Kluttz One run no hits no errors one left fumbled Ste vens grounder but recovered in time to toss to Dickson at 1st fo the out Marion threw out Furilli from deep short Reese walked Edwards bounded to Schoendiens who tossed to Marion at 2nd fore ing Reese No runs rio hits no errors one 3 Nazis Free But in Jail as Guests Nuernberg The acquitted rio of Nuernberg defendants Thursday still perched on the armys doorsteps at the Nuern erg prison and nobody was quite certain how long they would stay here Franz von Papen Hjalmar Schacht and Hans Fritzsche agreed 0 spend another night as guests of the army in the prison where hey have been held since last November This climaxed another day of offagain onagain shillyshally ng in which the three nazis first vcre threatened with arrest by Serman police then allegedly won 1 safe conduct out of the Amer can zone and finally apparently failed to win approval from any other zone to receive them The mixedup status of the 3 acquitted but still far from liber ated nazis was somewhat clari ied by a statement from Lieut Gen Lucius D Clay deputy American military commander in Berlin Clay said that lThe 3 still were technically in U S army custody They were army prisoners before the trials and after acquittal technically re verted to that status 2 The question of whether local German authorities have a right to arrest them and try them under denazification procedure is a legal one which is being dis cussed The question of the safe conduct demanded by the trio to another zone depends on the willingness of another zone com mander to admit them That may take 2 or 3 days to determine he said In the meantime the trio were Minnesotan Charged With Manslaughter Northwobd An information charging manslaughter againsi Conrad Ringstad of Albert Lea was filed Thursday by County Attorney L E Plummer in connection with the death ol John Rasmussen 69found dead in a barn at Emmons Minn Wednesday The information was changed from an earlier charge of murder Rasmussen had been working as a plasterer at Albert Lea Ringstad was to be arraignet before Justice C H Dwelle a Northwood provided lie wouli waive extradition He was ar rested by Albert Lea officers and was being held in jail there The town of Emmons lies im mediately on the border of Minne sota and Iowa and as the mans body was found on the Iowa side Sheriff Carl Sheimo of Northwood Iowa was calledinto the case as well as Coroner B J Klein ant County Attorney Plummer Sheimo said there were wounds on Rasmussens facewhich coulc not have been selfinflicted Ringstad was taken into cus tody late Wednesday after the sheriff county attorney and coro ner had completed their investi gation Coroner Klein said there would be no inquest At Albert Lea officials said the dead man drew his old age pension check on Tuesday but no money was found on his body when it was discovered made them sign a paper saying that they volun tarily as guests for the third successive night since acquittal Nuernberg denazification offi cials had ordered the 3 men ar rested as former nazis One hun dred policemen had surrounder the palace of justice waiting for them to come out The police were withdrawn on directions of the American military government The arrest order remained in effect however and the 3 acquit ted Nuernberg defendants may spend another night in their chosen sanctuary the Neurnfaerg jail Schacht said earlier that he was not leaving the courthouse partly because of the police outside ant besides its safe and cheaper in here Arrangements had not been completed for guaranteeingthe three men safe entrance into the British zone A U S military es cort presumably will be required as well as a promise to keep the Germans from carrying out the arrests Weather Report FORECAST Mason City Mostly cloudy anc cooler with occasional showers Thursday night and Friday Iowa Mostly cloudy Thursday night and Friday with occasional showers in north and extreme west portions Cooler in north west portion Thursday night and in west and extreme north por tions Friday Diminishing winds this evening Minnesota Partly cloudy and cooler Thursday night and Fri day occasional showers or thun dershowers east portion Thurs day night diminishing winds this IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statis tics for 24hour period ending at 8 oclock Thursday morning Maximum 74 Minimum 49 At 8 a m Thursday 56 YEAR AGO Maximum 59 Minimum 34 CONDITION MOST CRITI Hulls condition continues to be most critical the navy reported Thursday A bulletin from Bethesda Md naval hospital where the form er secretary of state suffered a stroke Monday said Mr Hull had a very poor night His con dition continues to be most crit ical No Work Salt Lake City U S employment office adopted a new line of persuasion in urging worn en to take parttime clerk jobs ii laborshort Salt Lake City It ad vised that clerking was the bes way to get first hand informatior on what merchandise is available V CANADA SCENE OF PLANE symbol pointer indicates area near Stephenville Nfld where an American Overseas airline plane crashed early Thursday after taking off from Stephenville on New YorkBerlin flight Just 2 weeks ago a Belgian airliner crashed near Gander A with loss of 27 lives AP Wirephoto Disappearing Hog and Cattle Act Breath Taking Unappreciated Cows Selling Higher Than Without OP A Chicago great disap pearing hog and cattleact acol ussal presentation now featured at all livestock markets rolled into its 2nd breathtaking month Thursday before a nationwide audience watching with baffled eyes and njeatless digestive tracts It was on Sept 3 the day after Labor day that the curtain went up on this unparalleled spectacle of the magicians show ivestock pens jammed the week Defore empty except for a few driedup cows arid emaciated pigs Since then the act has been re peated daily to an utterly unap preciative clientele and agricul ture department statistics for Sep tember showed receipts at record lows A minor feature of the perform ance somewhat overlooked in the concentration on the all star shortage is the fact that beef cows1 in a market controlled by price ceilings are selling at high er prices than they were in the free markets of July and August How anyone could buy live stock meat at higher prices and sell at lower prices and still make a profit was an incidental item of bewilderment to traders With the 2nd month of the per formance startingmost critics here predicted it would be taken off the boards But they couldnt agree on when President Truman predicted in the near future but Price Decon trol Board Chairman Thompson said it would be some time Dep uty OPA Administrator Baker gave to 4 weeks but Recon version Director Steelman fore cast the shortage will become worse this winter Livestock experts searching the records found that hog receipts invariably increase substantially Price and Wage Increases Stopor Steelman Reconversion Chief Suggests Consumers Refuseto BuyHigh Washington UR thief John R Steelman Thursday appealed to business and labor to ease up on price and wage increase demands Otherwise he warned the na tions economy will wind up in a boom and bust The consuming public could help Steelman said if it refused to buy things at higher prices Business should even reduce prices where it can He made his plea lor coopera tion from the major economic seg ments of the nation in his 1st quarterly report to the president and congress since taking on the job as director of war mobilization and reconversion Steelman who only a few weeks ago issued an order modifying wage stabilization controls in or der to end a maritime strike de clared that the nations economy has now reached a fork in the road One highway could lead to a greater more stable prosperity than ever before If the other is chosen it will lead to a disastrous inflation and economic collapse To business he addressed this appeal Business as a whole must fol low the lead of some of the busi nessmen who are acting to hold prices down wherever possible To labor Labor as a whole must support the labor leaders who are work ing toward industrial peace and not pushing for uneconomic wage increases which might precipitate t wageprice spiral To agriculture The farmers must maintain their high level of production for reasonable prices Is the very bas of our living standards To the consuming public Public resistance to highei prices Increased saving and self denial in the cases of goods which are not yet plentiful can be a tremendously effective weapon to keep prices in line Steelman indicated clearly tha he regarded price controls as the key element in the fight agains inflation and he admitted the ad ministration doesnt have much in the antiinflation weapons Business itself could takethi first and most salutary action to stem the threat of an economic collapse by reducing wherever possible without re ducing wages There can be no doubt he added that in some Industrie the profit position is such tha prices could be reduced and profit still be maintained at a satisfac tory level This will be even more true In the coming year as volum increases and unit costs come down Steelman said that despite pay increases granted in many indus tries gross weekly earnings of all workers in manufacturing indus tries dropped approximately 8 per cent between April 1945 aa July 1946 Steelman pointed out that price have already advanced further in the 3 months since the origina price control act expired last Jun 30 than they did in the previous 38 months He cited the increasein civilian employment to an alltime high o 58 million in August a drop in unemployment to 2000000 a rec ord high of a year in income payments to individu als and new peaks in busines profits and farm income WHOLBALE PRICE INDE CONSUMERS PRICE INDEX AUGUST 945IOO CtQTMMC All COMMODITIES OTHER THAN f ARM PRODUCTS AND WOO i ALL ABOARD DIE N FLAMING DIV AFTER TAKEOF Worst Commercial Air Transport Toll From Berlin Bound Plane New York American verseas airlines plane plunged in ames in the wilds of Newfound and Thursday and hours later the oast guard said rescue parties orted the 39 persons aboard were ead The coast guard said the brief message telling of the worst com mercial airline accident in history ras received at p m t said helicopters were enroute to tephenville 10 miles from the rash to take airline coast guard nd army officials to the scene Six of thepassengers On the ill ated plane were children ac ompanying their mothers who vere enroute to Europe to join heirhusbands There were 12 romen aboard An Air France transport captain flew over the wreckage 2 ours after the crash said on ar ival at New York that the plane urncd completely and there was 0 sign of life nearby Reports to the coast guard also aid the plane burnedand the pos ibility of any survivors was very emote Aboard the giant airliner were 1 passengers and a crew of 8 The hildrens ages ranged from 3 months to 11 years old The 4engine DC4 Skymaster was en route from New York to lerlin and plunged into the side f a rocky hill 10 minutes after it eft Stephenville Nfld at a m It left New York Wed nesday at a m The Air France captain Jacques Charmoz said he was at Stephen sceneof he crash when it occurred I could see the glow of the ex plosion before I took off he said after the takeoff we circled the wreck The plane hit the side of a hill quite high up and was still moking The light was poor and I could not identify any part of the plane saw a burnt spot on the hillside t is a fairly wooded hill I could ce no path cut through the trees he plane probably went straight nto the hill Earlier reports to the coast guard ndicated the plane hit 4 mile up he side of the hill and 100 feet rom the top of the slope which is overed with rocks and scrub trees The coast guard dispatched a 317 and a helicopter from Ar gentia Nfld The helicopter was expected to reach the scene at p m CST Thursday There have been 3 27victim plane crashes in American com mercial aviation In addition to the Sabena crash other such crashes involved an American airlines plane at San Diego Cal Vlarch 3 1946 and a nonsched uled Viking airline plunge near Richmond Va last May 16 The special assistant to the commanding general for search and rescue of the Atlantic divi sion of the airtransport command reported at Fort Totten N Y hat paratroopers from the 18th air transport command at Pres que Isle Maine and Goose Bay Labrador were speeding to Har mon field Stephenville to take part in the search and necessary rescue work Low ceilings and rain are pre vailing near the scene of the wreck the coast guard said Persons aboard the plane were crew members including a stewardess and31 passengers STEELMANS PRICE Director John R Steelman in his 8th re port to the president and congress Thursday presented charts from which these were prepared under the heading Whats Happened to Prices and subheaded UntilJune prices went up ony moderately since then they rose sharply Prices of farm products are up 28 per cent since VJ day AP Wirephoto Woman 49 Denies Having 25 Children Says She Has Only 21 Hayward Cal police teletype message from San Jose requested a check withMrs Aurelia Sandopal to ascertain if one of her 25 children is miss ing Mrs Sandopal counted off Yes there was one daugh ter But I have only 21 children 25 she protested San Jose was notified to return Dora and Mrs Sandopal 49 in a chat with Deputy Sheriff J J Sheehan gave the following fam ily chronology She was married at 12 Her eldest child is 34 the youngest 6 Her husband Jesse a cannery worker is 62 That Aint Hay or Lettuce Cincinnati Ohio UP Police are looking for robust thieves who walked off with 235 pounds of money from the home of Aloys Haben Haben said was stolen including 8250 quarters   

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