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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: September 25, 1946 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - September 25, 1946, Mason City, Iowa                                NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME AHS M4V MO I I A THE NEWSPAPER THAT HOME EDITION MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS VOL UI Anodated Presi and United Press Full Leased Wilts Five cent a Copy MASON CITY IOWA WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 251946 This Paper Consists of Two No 300 CIVIL WAR FLARES UP IN GREECE Big 4 Ministers Speed Up Peace Parley ADVOCATE GAG RULE FOR LONG WINDED TALKS Conference Hurries to Meet Oct 15 Deadline on 5 Peace Treaties Paris general opinion prevailed in peace conference cor ridors Wednesday that Prune Minister StaUnslatest pronounce ment on world affairs would aid materially in speeding the work of the 21nation parley and thus enable it to meet an Oct 15 dead line 5 treaties The foreign ministers of the Big Four all of whom read the Rus sian leaders statements carefully before convening adopted a speed up program Tuesday parently with a minimum of diffi culty and to get the work of the conferences commissions finished and get their recommendations before plenary sessions in time to adjourn by Oct 15 As this speedup program now stands the commissions will be urged to apply a gag rule on long winded speakers and will be re quired to take a vote on every issue before them by Oct 5 Rus sian and other Slavic delegates have reacted violently heretofore to any suggestion that debate be limited but Soviet Foreign Min ister V M Moiotov agreed to it Tuesday night He did differ with British For eign Secretary Ernest Bevin on the issue of what reports the plenary sessions should consider Moiotov said it shouldhandle only those amendmentsvoted on commissions tended that all amendments in cluding any which failed of deci sion in thecommissions should come before the pftnary sessions One diplomat who attended the Bg Four meeting said Moiotov did not press the point but reserved the right to bring it up later Stalins belief that there was no real danger of a new war and that the possibility of friendly coopera tion between Russia and the west ern democracies was tinued to be one ofthe principa topics of conversation among the delegates of the 21 nations His remarks had a powerfu effect on the delegates regardless of their east or west affilia tions since he speaks for Russia as perhaps no other leader in the world can speak for his country There was a tendency among the diplomats to believe thai Stalins statement was intcndec as a reply to or commentary on recent declarations by Henry A Wallace recently ousted U S secretary of commerce and For Accept Bids on Hemp Plant at Mason Gity Final written bids for the pur chase or lease of the Mason City hemp plant will be received unti 11 a m Oct 3 when they are to be opened at the office of rea property disposal of the War As sets administration in Chicago i was announced Wednesday by William T Kirby deputy region a director for WAA The notice lists approximately 40 acres of land 2 major struc tures with floor area totaling ap proximately 28000 square fee with machinery and equipment It adds that it is desired to dis pose of approximately 10 acres o land with the buildings as an in dustrial unit Proposals for land in addition to 10 acres if desired will be considered The office of real property dis posal also reserves the right to reject any and all proposals The WAA last month turned down 2 offers of each for the plant They were made by the Lapiner Motor company Mason City and the Hawkeye Wire Products company Clear Lake Since then the plant has been re advertised for sale or lease mer British Foreign Anthony Eden Secretary Wallace had urged a relaxation in the socalled get tough policy toward Russia had suggested a new approach irT dealing with the Soviet Union At any rate one diplomat com mented Stalins statement shows there still are men who believe a solution can be Stalins opinion shouldcarry a lot of weight NEW MARITIME STRIKE LOOMS Marine Engineers Vote 9 to 1 for Walkout New York York port members of the Marine Engineers Beneficial association which has members among li censed personnel in the engine rooms of virtually all the Ameri can merchant marine voted ap proximately 9 to 1 to strike after the expiration of contracts with ship owners Sept 30 a spokes man for M E B A announced Wednesday Lawrence Kammet public rela tions director for the union said the vote was 1084 in favor of a work stoppage and 125 against He quoted Edward P Trainer business agent for local 33 as say ing the union did not want a tie up but we must get our just de mands and if we have to strike we will The workers want higher pay and other changes in a new con tract The union has 15000 mem bers in 25 ports During World War II one sec tion of railroad track near Lon dons Waterloo station was bombed 92 times without stop ping regular train schedules Price Boost Is Due for Cooking Oils Washington Prices for margarine shortening and salad oils headed upward Wednesday An OPA official told a reporter ceilings for consumer packages of these items to be raised at least 2 cents as a result of a decision by Stabilization Director John R Steelman that higher prices are justified for oU ingred ients Steelman called in to arbitrate a dispute between OPA and the agriculture department sided with the latter agency in announcing his decision Tuesday night The agriculture department had contended that a price boost was necessary to assure adequate pro duction of cottonseed oil Under the new price control law the department has authority to order an increase on this ground OPA took the stand that all that was needed to get production rollingwas an announcement that the government contemplated no increase in ceilings for this oil or for oil made from soy beans corn and peanuts In announcing his ruling Steel man wrote Acting Secretary of Agriculture Charles F Brannan On the basis of the facts laid before me I cannot help but agree with you that an increase in the prices of these vegetable oils will be necessary to obtain increased production Actually Steelman has no au thority under the price control act to orderan increase in ceil ings But both OPA and the agri culture department had agreed to abide byv his decision Prices for margarine shortening and other products made from vegetable oils were raised a cent for consumer packages when the price decontrol board restored ceilings on these items late last month This increase offset a can celled subsidy December Outdoes June in Number of Iowa Marriages Des Mofaes a reversal of traditionthere were more mar riages in Iowa during December 1945 than in last year This probably wont happen again soon Last December marked a high point in army discharges For many lowans it was a mere step from a uniform into wedding togs L E Chancellor chief of the state vital statistics division also came up Wednesday with these items from last years Iowa records An 37 year old man married a 22 year old girl The average Iowa bride was 19 years fid the average groom 22 There were 33 mixed marriages including 12 white women who married Negro men There were 21264 marriages and 7606 divorces The divorce rate reached an alltime high of 299 cases for each 1000 population A 32 year old Iowa woman got her 6th divorce and a 62 year old man got a license for his 8th marriage Anderson Hints Opposition to Meat Decontrol Campaign Secretary Says Present Ceiling Price Adequate to Promote Production Washington livestoc industry was confronted Wednes day with signs the administratio will strongly oppose its drive fo immediate decontrol of meat as cure for the current meat famine Secretary of Agriculture Clinton P Anderson dropped a broad bin of the administrations intention with a statement that present ceil ing prices on agricultural product are adequate to promote needec food production The meat industry which be jeves price controls are largely responsible for the meat shortage is preparing a petition asking An derson to wipe out controls on ive cattle and beef If Anderson tons them down they can appea o the independent decontro board Producers of pork and lamb ar expected to follow the beef in erests in a decontrol move Th milling industry already has filec a request for removal of controls on flour Anderson discussed the agricul ural price situation Tuesday nigh in a radio speech from Albuquer que N Mex The agriculture dcpartmen eels that price adjustments are now behind us Anderson said Chere may be a few additiona ncreases he added but they wil ie heldto the minimum required y law Top OF A officials reporting tha overall food prices have risen some 4 to 15 per cent since last June 0 said they were favorably im jressed by Andersons declara ion Anderson defended his recenl for food price ncreases as necessary productioi ncentives This he said explained lis action in ordering higher live tock ceilings than favored by OPA The problem he said was to rrive at a price for livestock ood enough to be an incentive to armers to expand production and et far below the runaway prices onsumers paid during July and lugust He said the current meat short ge was expected because after rice ceilings were restored the revious heavy market runs ol ghtweight livestock dr o p p e d harply as we knew they must if ve were to avoid a prolonged meat amine later on Anderson contended the conver ion of record feed crops into meat in months to come pro UN Security Council Rejects Russian Move for Troop Data Lake Success N T United Nations security council wiped its docket clean of business Wednesday but delegates were unable to erase fresh signs of concern over their failure to agree From as high a levei as the office of United Nations Secretary General Trygve Lie down through lower strata of the world organi zation officials appeared upset over the new evidence of disagree ment piled up in the councils latest string of 18 tense meetings The session was climaxed late Tuesday by the overwhelming de the Russian proposal from reaching the agenda al Eeat of Russias effort to require Jnited Nations inventories of all iroops and bases maintained in friendly foreign territories by the allies A bloc of western power votes cept even hough Soviet A romyko did manage to unload some extensive charges before the discussion was stopped The action n effect cleared the United States and Britain of soviet charges that heir troops in such countries as China Iceland Brazil Egypt Iraq and others are possible threats to peace The vote was 1 to 2 against placing the proposal on the agen da with Russia and Poland filling a familiar role as the only sup porters of a Russian proposal Frarifce and Egypt abstained from voting after expressing some doubt about whether the council should refuse at least to hear the soviet proposal Unless Gromyko decides to present it in some other perhaps as a more specific com plaint against American or British forces in some pro posal now is dead Lie and other officials of the UN secretariat found themselves reiterating the longaccepted fact that unless the vetoequipped delegates of Britain Russia and the United States as well as those of France and China can agree the worlds peaceprotecting body never can take a positive step SECRETARY ANDERSON vide more meat than otherwise would have been available He warned the nationsfarmers that the public resents high food prices and advised themto culti vate domestic markets by keeping farm prices reasonable Woman Held on Murder Charge for Death of Tot Found in Toilet Keosauqua Cook 23 Wednesday was being held in Jie Van Buren county jail charged with 1st degree murder after a coroners jury found that she was responsible for the death of an infant boy whose jody was found in an outdoor oilet in Milton Iowa last Thurs day The woman was bound over to he grand jury on the murder charge Tuesday after she waived preliminary hearing and was held without bond County Attorney William Mc Connell said the woman had ad mitted burying the infant found ast Thursday and also another child found in a toilet at Keosau qua and had admitted she was the mother of both babies The child found here Monday was buried more than a year and a half ago McConnell said The hild at Milton apparently had died shortly after birth about a week ago The charge was filed n connection onlywith the childs ody found in Milton octor Testifies Woman Was Slowly Fed Poison Sioux City preliminary learing for a retired farmer who s accused of trying to kill his wife with poison was scheduled to go nto its 2nd session Wednesday Witnesses for the stale were ieard Tuesday in municipal court n the case against Martin Wecker 4 formerly of near Merrill Iowa Dr C V Bowers family physi ian said that after treating Mrs tunice Wecker for several months ie became convinced in April 945 that she was being poisoned lowly through drugs administered n fruit and vegetable juices Prof James A Coss Morning ide college testified he found races of poison on a fork and cup rom the Wecker cupboard in tests made at therequest of Dr Bow rs and police Detective Lt Russell H White old the court Wecker had said nder questioning that he planned o get rid of his wife In recent months Mrs Wecker as been living with a daughter Radioactive Ships Docked on West Coast Washington p e r a t i o n crossroads Wednesday announced that about 75 atom bomb tesl ships suspected of being danger ous have been quarantined until they are made radiologically safe The ships part of the join armynavy iask force that carried 40000 men through the Bikini tests are berthed on the w e s 1 coast and at Pearl Harbor The announcement said an un expected radioactive residue was found in the salt water lines and condensers of some of the return ing vessels when they underwent a precautionary check We have not had any casualties from radioactivity during oper ation crossroads and we most cer tainly are not going to take any chances now said Capt George M Lyon task force safety officer This largely unforeseen result of the atomic bomb burst he ad ded in a statement is another example of the great value of these tests to our country and to the armed forces Without these tests much valu able information of this type might have gone undiscovered until ac tual casualties occurred very pos sibly in some peacetime develop ment in the use of atomic energy None of the quarantined ships was in the target area when the test bombs exploded The announcement said there Is no danger to anyone not working on the ships nor are harbors or docking facilities affected All repair ormaintenance work on thevessels has been suspended until radiological experts can carry out decontamination work To the surprise of test officials radioactive residue was found in salt water pipes and condensers of ships arriving on the west coast Light Frost Does Not Hit Field Crops North lowans awoke Wednes day morning to find the landscape covered with a white frost which ladcome with a drop in tempera ure to 33 degrees during the night Little or no damage was re torted to gardens and field crops Even flowers and tender plants escaped damage with exception jf those in low spots Farmers reported no damage to he North Iowa corn or bean crops except in rare cases where the rop was late and in low spots If anything this light frost hould benefit the corn and hurry maturity before we get a hard rost one farmer stated Corn in this section is rapidly getting out of frost danger with armers hoping for a week or 2 f sunshine A high proportion of Iowas 946 corn crop is in the hard dry ngout stage and thus would be afe from frost the department f agriculture at Des Moines re orted Wednesday in its weekly veather and crop bulletin There are however some late ields in scattered areas which are ot expected to mature even aough the frost period is delayed he report said POWER STRIKE HITS most office buildings and industrial firms in Pittsburgh closed by a strike of the Duquesne Power Company workerSj citizens found themselves living in an atmosphere of candle lantern and lamp light Banks required by law to remain open got along with oldfashioned oil lamps as in the Mel lon National Bank above where Cashier Florence Iffarth cashes a check with a minimum of lighting effect Inter national Soundphoto 9 More Union Leaders Face Contempt of Court Charge President of Striking Workers Is Sentenced to I Year in Prison The McFarlin Memorial Meth dist church in Norman Okla built by Robert M McFarlin s a memorial to his son at a cost f more than Weather Report FORECAST Mason City Fair Wednesday night Thursday partly cloudy and turning cooler Rather windy Iowa Fair and somewhat warm er Wednesday night Thursday partly cloudy and turning cool er Rather windy Low tempera tures Wednesday night 42 north to 45 south High Thursday 70 north and 75 south Minnesota Scattered showers Wednesday night followed by clearing Thursday Cooler northwest portion Wednesday night and entire state Thurs day Southwesterly winds 20 to 30 miles an hour becoming northwesterly 15 to 25 miles an hour late Wednesday night and Thursday IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics for 24 hour period ending at 8 oclock Wednesday morning Maximum 56 Minimum 33 At 8 a m Wednesday 47 Light frost YEAR AGO Maximum 68 Minimum 40 Pittsburgh A nineman strike committee announced in court Wednesday its recommenda ions that 3500 striking utility workers end a twodayold power walkout which had benumbed in dustry and business life in the steel capital The committee men said through counsel that the union member ship would vote Wednesday night on a new company proposal to iettle the dispute Details of the companys offer were unannoun ced The committee said it would urge that the members accept the offer The unexpected offer came as reverberations of the strike piled up end on end In consequence of the strike committees action the court post poned until Thursday a contempt case involving the nine men The court had said it would hold them n contempt unless they called the trike off The committee then explained that it has no power to call off the strike on its own ac the membership as a whole is authorized to do so The committeemen were told they were at liberty but must re port by telephone to Judge Harry H Rowland president of the threejudge court with the re sults of the general membership meeting by 9 and no later than 10 oclock Eastern Standard Time Wednesday night The court Tuesday sentenced George L Mueller president of the striking union to one year in i jail for contempt of court Muel ler had refused to end the power in a city of Pittsburghs furth er curtailed business in the steel capital Wednesday Already more than 20000 work ers were idle in steel plants and other industries closed because of the power strike Thousands more office and shop workers were kept home by curtailment of street car service which Wednesday sagged to as low as 25 per cent of normal The light company manned its power plants chiefly with super visors but said the power supply nevertheless was reduced to 35 per cent of normal Wednesday Electricity still flowed to stores and homes but the company con tinued appeals to all to conserve its use A company spokesman said he present limited service could be continued for several days if enough voluntary ration ing is applied The first bus curtailment was announced Wednesday Buses stopped on 4 heavilytraveled Pittsburgh routes because their garage maintenance men are members of the striking Independ ent Association of Duquesne Light company employes For many business workers in Pittsburgh the strike meant an other holiday from work Wed nesday Some 1500000 people live in the strikeaffected area of 817 square miles known the world over for its smoky steel mills Twentyfive of the Bahama is lands are inhabited Disposal of Italys Colonies Entrusted to 4 Big Powers Paris of the Italian colonies of Libya Eritrea and Sornaliland was entrusted Wednesday to the 4 major powers the United States Russia Britain and France Gladwyn Jebb of Great Britain speaking for the 4power foreign ministers council assured the peace conference that the nations which fought on the allied side in Africa would be fully consulted Jebb who attended the foreign ministers meeting Tuesday with BritishForeign Secretary Ernest Bevin told the Italian political and territorial commission that Ethiopia Egypt and Australia would be heard However he reserved Bri tains right to speak before the United States and Russia saying we fought alone on the desert of Libya and stopped the Afrika Korps at El Alamein The commission adopted the article on the Italian colonies which assigns the final decision to the 4 powers after hearing claims from Egypt for Eritrea and Cire naica and from Ethiopia for Eritrea and Sornaliland The United States favors in dependence as soon as possible Tor most of the Italian colonies Bevin visited U S Secretary of State James P Byrnes Wednes day presumably to clarify the positions of the two major western powers Jebb said Britain believed Ethiopia deserved the greater part of Eritrea He said his country also favored some front ier rectifications of Cirenaica in favor of Egypt as well as inde pendence for Cirenaica and per haps the whole of Libya if special consideration was made for Italians in Tripolitania the west ern section Article 17 dealing with the colonies declares that Italy shall renounce all right to the colonies and entrusts ultimate disposal to the four governments to be de cided within one year Jebb said the decision will have to be unanimous If no decision is reached he indicated Britain would favor referring to the United Nations general assembly In the military commission Russia sought to quash Tuesdays decision to defortify Bulgarias border with Greece The Russian delegate held that since article nine of the military clauses of the Bulgarian treaty did not mention defortification it would be a change in an adopted portion of the treaty text Britain then moved that defortification consti tute a new BRITISH FORCE TO BE USED AS LAST RESORT Leftist Forces Fight Government Troops in North Part of Country London and British government officials Wednesday labelled the mounting violence in northern Greece outright civil war and disclosed that stern measures were under way to crush the re bellion A Greek embassy spokesman charged that the hostilities repre sentedan invasion by subversive elements from Albania and Yugo slavia with the connivance of the 2 King George II voted back to the Greek throne in a recent pleb iscite prepared to leave Thursday for Malta on the journey to Athens from wartime exile in Britain A British foreign office spokes man said the Greek government had given British representatives in Athens evidence indicating that leftist forces attacking the gendar merie in the north were being armed from Yugoslavia and Al bania He added that British troops Jn Greece could be called upon to act only in a last resort and would not be used unless the Greek government specifically re quested such aid Greek Premier Coustantin Tsal daris said in a Salonika speech that the disorders no longer posed a question of order but a ques tion of war and declared the state will emerge victorious by us ing all the means at its disposal and without any hesitancy in tak ing any measures New outbreaks were reported in dispatches from Macedonia where the Greek press ministry said a strong band of leftists attacked the village of Pendalophos and were repulsed hva sharp battle in which 23 attackers died The ministry said it confirmed a report that the town of Deskate captured 3 days ago by 2000 left ists was recaptured by govern ment forces in a battle in which the leftists lost 80 killed 178 cap tured and many wounded On the eve of King George IIs return to his throne the Greek government presented evidence to the British that the forces now being opposed by Greek troops were being armed from the out side the spokesman said Pressed o identify the countries involved the official said they were Yugo slavia and Albania he added lowever that no units of foreign iroops were involved so far as he mew We have no reason to doubt he Greek governments evidence ie said He said that military measures neing taken by Greek government orces were not the result of con sultations with the British com mander in chief in Greece The foreign office spokesman explained that maintenance of aw and order in Greece was first of all the responsibility of the Greek gendarmerie If the gendar meries is unable to cope with the situation he said the Greek army could intervene He added that Jrilish troops could be used only f there was a request from the ireek government The spokesman said he did not mow whether the present fight ng in northern Greece was in any vay connected with the pending return of King George II to his hrone Evidence presented British rep resentatives by the Greek govern ment indicated that Yugoslav and Albanian individuals were partici pating in the present actions in the lorth the spokesman said but no units of foreign troops were in olved so far as he knew Greek armed forces still are re eiving arms and equipment from Britain the spokesman said jrandma Barnett Goes o Scott County Home Davenport controver y over the case of Mrs Winni red Grandma Barnett who was serving a 35 year sentence mposed in 1913 for the slaying of ler husband ended Wednesday with her arrival here from Rock well City womans reformatory The whitehaired 73 year old Javenport Negress was brought iere by Mrs Helen M Talboy rison superintendent by automo ile She will be placed in the Scott county home for the aged Miss Ruth Camp overseer said Grandma Barnett had in sted that she must serve her ull sentence although it had been educed for good behavior and iad refused to leave the institu ion She had also pleaded with uthoritics I have no people or lome and nobody will want me Let me stay in prison until I die   

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