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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: September 24, 1946 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - September 24, 1946, Mason City, Iowa                                NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME HISTORY Arts ARCKI MOIHCS I A THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS HOME EDITION tew and United Fresi Full Incased Wires Five Cents a Copy MASON CITY IOWA TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 24 1946 No 299 STALIN SEES NO DANGER OF WAR Charge Shielding Maritime War Operations Washington IP A suggestion oy Rep Weichel R Ohio that the house merchant marine com mittee is seeking to shield the wartime financial operations of the maritime commission brought a heated denial Tuesday from Chairman Bland D Va Interrupting the questioning of Henry Kaiser west coast ship builder and his son Edgar Bland declared There Is no desire to shield anybody but to bring out the facts fully There is no intention to exonerate or excuse anyone or to crucify anyone Bland said maritime officials and records will be examined fully later in the hearing called to inquire into wartime profits of 19 companies that constructed ships in governmentowned ship yards The questions as to the Kaiser financial setup arose Monday after the committee heard testi mony that Kaiser shipbuilding en terprises received in profits from the government on a capital investment of The committee also was told that an unrelated company in Florida ran a investment into profits of more than an item which prompted Reps Fred Bradley R Mich and Al vin Weichel R Ohio to demand a fullscale investigation Kaiser who disputed the figures relating to his company repeated edly told committee counsel he was unable to answer some of the questions about his financial structure at the moment The committee excused him until Tuesday In his statement at Tuesdays session Kaiser said We want this committee to un derstand that there isnt a single thing we arent happy to disclose that is in our books and corporate records State School Aid Is Near Moines of a million dollarsin state aid i 2282 Iowa school districts was I step nearer Tuesday i State Superintendent Jessie A Parker Wednesday sent to Stai Comptroller C Fred Porter a list i the districts which will share th fund in amounts varying from les than for sonic districts to peak of at Council Bluff Porter said he would send ou the checks as soonas the Iowa su preme court disposed finally of case attacking the appropriation The court already has upheld th fund but a petition for rehearin is pending Miss Parker said the state wa embarking on a new philosoph in financing education with thi first statewide equalization dis tribution in Iowa history The formula for apportionmen favors districts with low real es tate valuations and relative large enrollments Some cities and towns includ ing Des Moines Sioux City Ce dar Rapids andMason City will not receive any assistanceunde the formula Council Blufl school district apportionments v are 746 Ottamwa Newton Cedar Falls an Cehterville V All of Iowas 99 counties hav qualify for assist ance but the largest number b qualifyingdistricts are in th southernpart of Iowa Other citieswhich do not shar jntheaid allotment included Bur lingtpn Carroll Cherokee Clin ton Davenport Dubuque For Dodge Iowa City Muscatine Spencer and Waterloo Other allocations included At lantic Charles City Creston Esthervffle Marshalltown M i s s o u r Valley Perry and Webster City Expect Frost Along Minnesota Border By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Frost was forecast along thi Minnesota border Thursday nigh afterfrbst predictionsin northern Iowa failed to materialize Mon day night ihough the m e nc ur y dropped to42 degrees at Decorah early Tuesday morning Skies generally were clear ant the weathermild Tuesday anc fair and warmer weather was on the schedule for Wednesday High temperatures Wednesday were expected to be 7075 degrees Weather Report FORECAST Mason City Fair Tuesday night andWednesdayCooler Tuesday night Rising temperature Wed hesdajr Iowa Fair Tuesday night and Wednesday Cooler Tuesday night with light frost near the Minnesota border Warmer Wed nesday Lows Tuesday night 40 45 Highs Wednesday 7075 Iowas 5day mean temperature will 24 degrees below normal State normal 61 Warmer Wednesday cooler Thursday becoming warmer again Friday and Saturday Precipitation will average light occurring as showersWednesday Minnesota Clearing slowly Tues day night with temperatures falling to nearfreezing by Wed nesday morning Heavy frost likely Fair and warmer Wed nesday IN MASON CIT GlobeGazette weather statis tics for 24 hour period ending at 8 oclock Tuesday morning Maximum 54 Minimum 41 At 8 a m Tuesday 50 Precipitation 05 YEAR AGO Maximum 84 Minimum 43 I THE HORSE COMESJPO THE to get any other red meat the Massachusetts General hospital in Boston Mass has started serving horsemeat to person nel Jacqueline Burns student dietitian samples horse burger as Wauneta Westcott watches If the meat situa tion doesnt ease the patients will soon get it also AP Wirephoto Bulgaria Fortifications Are Cut by Peace Commission Paris peace conference military commission voted Tues day to defortify the southeastern border of Slav Europe adoptinga Greek amendment to the Bulgarian treaty which would shear Bul garia of frontier fortifications The vote was 11 to 7 with 3 abstentions It came as the 4 Power foreign ministers council was arranging to liscuss Italian colonies and other lisputes holding up the progres if the conference The proposition is to demili arize Bulgarias 18 mile frontier with Greece to the same extent s Italys frontier with Yugoslavia Only Brazil and the Slav dele gates opposed the move China Ethiopia and Norway ab tained The Brazilian delegate aid heregretted to vote agains he amendment but that Brazi a matter of principle hat all nations should be entitlec o organize the defense of their wn frontiers issue rose from sovietbacked Bulgar an for Greecescoastal anhandle south of the border irhicb would give a Slav Europe ts centuryold dream of a strategic utlet on the Mediterranean The disputed Greek territory has een invaded by Bulgarian forces tunes since 1912 Bulgaria her elf demanded the territory at the eace conference Greece at first made counter emands to shift the border to ive her strategic mountain eights Jefferson Caffery U S ambas ador to Paris suggested that reeces security could be better ssured by demilitarizing Bui arias side of the frontier with ut creating new population prob ems Greece accordingly proposed the mendment resulting in a Slav alkout from the Bulgarian poli cal and territorial commission be re the proposal was referred to ie military commission In Tuesdays discussion Soviet en N V Slavin broke tie news tat the United States Britain and ranee were supporting the Greek amendment when he protested gainst their change of attitude U S Brig Gen Jesmond D aimer replied that the 3 powers ad made up their minds 10 days The soviet general persisted in ewing the Greek amendment as change in an agreed portion of e draft text although the Bul rian treaty says specifically that thistext should beconsidered as tentative The Russian even abstained on a desperate last minute sub amendment by Yugoslavia to limit the defortified zone to a depth of 5 kilometers about It lost by 11to 4 with 6 abstentions Another last minute move a Czechoslovak motion to adjourn lost 12 to 8 with 1 abstention Valuable Sausage Is ie of Car Mishap Chicago Helen Tern pies worries about her sausage in these meatless days left her with a smashed car aid bruisedtoee As she drove along a north side street the sausage began to slip off a seat beside her When she reached for it she lost control of her automobile and crashed info a lamppost Highway Deaths 372 Des of 1946 motor vehicle fatalities in Iowa stood at 372 Tuesday This was the same number recorded during all of 1945 and a year ago at this time220 persons had lost their lives in traffic accidents But as a practical matter h added no one man in our organ ization could testify as to all o these complicated corporate fin ancial and business transaction over a 5year period I cannot d it No one can do it He reiterated that combined ne profits after taxes of the 4 Kaiser shipbuilding companies were les than of one per cent of th total volume of work done for th maritime commission after de ducting all losses Even if the losses on other op erations are not deducted h said the combined profits ar less than 1 per cent He said that taking into accouri all integrated operations in wa production which includes making steel for ships and guns a well as building the er Inc did not make a profi but in fact suffered losses The committee hearing which will cover operations of companie which built ships for the maritime commission in governmentownec shipyards were scheduled to las only a week One week wont be enough Bradley told reporters This wil take weeks to get to the bottom of The testimony already given shows that one company ran up to more than with out any risk and that others did the with larger amounts Bradley referred to was identified Monday as thi St Johns River Shipbuildini Corp near Jacksonville Fla Statistics supplied by the mari time commission and read to tlv committee by Ralph E Casey at torney for the general accounting office showed that the compan had a capital investment of as a shipyard operator and realizec an estimated profit of At Jacksonville Kenneth A Merrill shipyard executive ant vice president of the now defunct St Johns River corporation de scribed the report as fantastic1 adding We did nothing but manage the enterprise and we were on a fee basis from the maritime commis sion OTOWA BUS STRIKE ENDS Lines Must Still Get Revoked Licenses Back Ottumwa This citys buses strikebound since Aug 30 were back in operation Tuesday Settlement of the 24day strike was announced Monday night aft er a meeting between striking union membersand Ed Houghton hicago of the National City lines which operates the Ottum wa City Lines Houghton said a memorandum agreement was signed providing or reinstatement arcel president Lester D the AFL Street Railway Employes union ocal Parcel immediately was granted sick leave The strike had irisen because of a dispute over lis status Operations were resumed by ermission of Mayor David A Jevin pending appearanceof the ines before the city council Tues lay to seek reinstatement of their icenses The council last week cancelled he lines licenses in an effort to peed settlement of the contro versy which involved 43 drivers and 11mechanics The company operates 23 buses and has a vol umeof about 13000 fares daily Sternwheel River Steamer for Sale Washington a stern vheel1 river steamer The maritime commission has ne and will acceptbids from in erested buyers until Oct 18 Its he passenger steamer Delta King sed by the navy during the war s a barracks ship and now at uisuh Bay Cal Built in 1926 the Delta King is 80 feet long with a speed of 10 knots and grosstonnage of 1937 POWER STRIKE HITS power units in downtown Pitts burgh are set up to supply power to the city and county buildings where the mayors office and courts are situated as the walkout of the Duquesne light company employes got under way Tuesday AP Wirephoto Pittsburgh Is Hit by 3rd Power Strike in 7 Months Pittsburgh 3rd power strike in 7 months hit the steel metropolis Tuesday curtailing steel operations and street car trans portation in an area of 1500000 inhabitants As the walkout of Duquesne Light company employes got under way the Pittsburgh Railways company announced a 50 per cent cu n trolley citys main method of public transportation Trolley normally transport 1000800 persons daily here The lightcompany announced is industrial consumers were practically shutdown A spokes man said of its 1500 employes walkedout bu na the company stillhas a lim ted amount of power He addec hatthe power output would be curtailed unless homeowners tores office buildings etc con inue to conserve electricity The strike was called by an in ependent union against the Du quesne Light Co to enforce a de mand for a 20 per cent wage in rease among other things The union isthe Independent Associa ion of Employes of the Duquesne jght Co and associated com lanies The strike was called at the ame hour as was set for a hear ng by 3 judges in common pleas ourt on a petition by the city of Mttsburgh to make permanent an njunction forbidding the strike The power strike began to ripple Pittsburghs business and industrial activities within a few minutes after it was called Thousands of downtown work ers were sent home from work nd others had been told not to eport Several large industrial plants ere forced to close down entire So were department stores Hotels and office buildings were pen but in most cases services fere severely curtailed The situation at the William enn hotel seemed typical of the roblem conirontihg most down own hotels Therej lights except those i the corridors anda few in the ibby were turned out people had i show a room key to get up tairs and detectives guarded all ntrances The hotel has its own power but it was taking precau ons to conserve the electric upply Only one elevator in each bank elevators at the hotel was op rating and each of these had a elective aboard Most of the guests including the undreds here for a Masonic con vention iKfdimlylit lobby because their room lights wereturned outIt was a dark gloomy day with overcast skies traditional of the Smoky city Scientist Sees No Necessity for Sun in Future Garden Growing Princeton N jr scien tist who had much to do toward developing the atomic bomb said Tuesday that the time may come when man will not need the sun to make his garden grow This scientist tall lanky Glenn Seaborg University of California physicist told a conference on the future of nuclear science that mans ability tosynthesize food and also fuel was not out of the question This could rise he said to a literal harnessing of the suns en ergy To dovthis trick scientists will lave to do further research with radioactive isotopau the byprod uct of the uranium chainreacting piles in the atomic bomb factor Babe Bisignano Gets 0 Day Sentence Stay Des Moines A 60day itay in his contempt of court sen ence was granted 91 Babe Car nera Bisignano by the Iowa sup erne court Monday in order that lemay carry an appeal to the U c supreme court The court granted the stay after denying the Des Moines night club operator a rehearing of the case in which he was sentenced to 6 months in jail and fined by unicipal Judge Harry B Grund Plan Farm Meeting Washington D The re congressional food study ommittee will meet at Sioux City Iowa Oct 1 in one of a eries of midwestern sessions to btain the ideas of farmers on a ong range agricultural program Meat Hungry Nation Eyes Near Record Cattle Grazing Washington meat hungry nation is witnessing the aradox of nearrecord numbers of cattle roaming the ranges while dinner table platters are empty of beef Agriculture department officials said Tuesday the number of cattle in the nations farms is not far below the 1944 peak and that the lumber on western ranges may e the largest of record But grassfed cattle are not moving off ranges to slaughter lens in numbers the government lad expected Department experts aid uncertainty over future prices ends to delay marketings This picture of the beef situa ion was depicted as Secretary of Agriculture Clinton P Anderson prepared to make a radio talk at p m CST Tuesday night on government price policies on farm products Aides said the secretary was expected to discuss the livestock situation This is the season when cattle normally start moving off ranges in large numbers But the move ment has been slow since live stock price controls were reestab lished Sept 1 Hence beef sup plies in butcher shops are meager Cattle fea on southern and west ern ranges usually start market ward as soon as pastures begin drying up which sometimes is as early as July The movement usually reaches its peak in October Range cattel have two markets slaughters and B mid western corn belt feeders Slaugh ters bid lor the fatter grassfed stock while feeders buy lean and moderately fattened animals These are put on grain feed for several months to fatten them to heavier weights and better quality In discussing the small number of range cattle reaching slaugh terers this month officials cited several reasons among them 1 Some western cattlemen are holding back in the hope of higher prices either through a hike in OPA reilirvfc pr possible removal of price controls 2 Cornbelt feeders have been bidding heavily against slaughter ers for cattle which might go either to the slaughter pens or to feed lots With a record corn crop in prospect and with feed prices expected to decline feeders see a chance ofmaking money by producing heavier weight cattle 3 Some cattlemen are waiting until after January 1 for income tax purposes Cattle sold after that date would be charged against income in 1947 which farmers expected to be smaller than this year Hence they would pay less taxes than if they sold this year Egypt Reveal Negotiation on British Force Lake Success N Y Egyptian government served no tice on the United Nations secur council Tuesday that it pre on 4he British troops in Egypt and it was not ready to bring that case beforethe coun cil at present Opening the 2nd day of debate on Russias proposal that the se curity council gather information on the disposition of allied troops in foreign nonenemy countries Mahmoud Bey Fawzi Egyptian delegate to the council said that negotiations are in progress be tween Egypt and Great Britain on that question If these negotiations fail Egypt will not hesitate to bring the case before the security council he said He declared thatEgypt felt the door should be left open for inclusion of the question at some future date Hsia discloSea his position as the delegates prepared to resume discussion on the question of ad ftitting to the councils agenda a Soviet demand for data on the disposition of allied troops in for eign nonenemy countries During Mondayslengthy debate Soviet Delegate Andrei A Gromy ko cited China as oneof the 8 spots where eitherAmerican oc British troops mightcause inter national friction unless they are withdrawn The other spots he isted were Iceland Panama Bra I Egypt Iraq Greece and Indo nesia Hsia said he would object to consideration of the Russian ques ion on the ground that no situa ion existed which warranted se curity council intervention under he provisions of the IT N char ter Uovernor Proclai ms towa Newspaper Week From Oct 1 to 8 Des Moines news paper week Oct 18 has been proclaimed by Gov D Blue in recognition of the great services rendered by our newspapers The proclamation said Our printed pages have been he guide of civilization and one jf our defenses in preserving the iberties of free people The main enanee of a free press guaran ees the right of free speech and assembly and the right to worship according to the dictates of our iwn hearts More Room Needed for Russian Foreign Policy Course at Iowa City Iowa City UniveN sity of Iowa officials scheduled a course in Russian Foreign Pol icy for the fall semester they an ticipated an enrollment of 25 and made classroom arrangements ac cordingly But when more than 100 stu dents signed up an auditorium room in the geology building was hastily pressed into service to ac commodate the crowd FEELS THREAT WITH OUR SOLE BOMB CONTROL Believes Possibility of Friendly Relations With Western Powers Moscow Minister Stalin said Tuesday he could see no real danger of a new war and expressed his unqualified belief in the possibility of long and friendly collaboration between the soviet union and the western democra cies despite ideological differen ces At he same time he said the United States now held a threat to peace in monopolist possession of atomic weapons but that such monopolist possession could not long be maintained In any event he said wars could not be won with atomic bombs He also charged that the reten tion of United States military forces in China threatened peace Stalin expressed these views in answer to 9 written questions sub mitted by Alexander Werth Mos cow correspondent of the London Sunday Times The soviet leader said he did not believe the United States and Britain weretrying to encircle Russia with a capitalist ring and could not doso even if they so desired He said Russia had no intention of usingGermany either against western Europe or against the United States since this would not be in the interest of the soviet union He called for demilitarization and democratization of Germany as one step toward a stable and lasting peace should strongly dif ferentiate between the hue and cry about a new war which does not exist at present Stalin said Stalins replies Jo Werth were foreign correspondents letter since March 22 when he told Associated Press Correspondent Eddy Gilmore he believed in the united nations as an instrument of peace At that time he told Gilmore he belived neither the nations nor their armies are seeking another war and he urged a campaign to ex pose warmongers Werth asked Stalin if he be lieved the actual monopoly pos session of the atomic bomb by the United States of America is one of the principal threats to peace I do not believe the atomic jomb to be as serious a force as certain politicians are regard it the prime minister Atomic bombs are in ended for intimidating weak nerves but they cannot decide the ratcome of war since atomic ombs are by no means sufficient or this purpose He added that there were two remedies to such a threat Mon opoly possession could not last ong and use ofthe atom bomb would be prohibited Werth stating be was using the words employed by former Secre ary Commerce Henry A Wai ace in his recent foreign policy peech in New York asked Stalin rhether western Europe and the Jnited States could be assured hat Soviet policies in Germany would not be directed against hem The prime minister replied that use of Germany as a weapon gainst the west was excluded joth by the Potsdam agreements and by the Soviet mutual assist ance pacts with Britain and France gainst German aggression He dded that such a use of Germany would mean a departure of the Soviet Union from its fundamental nterests Stalin described as absurd ny thought that policies of com minist parties in other nations were dictated by Moscow He dded that he believed commun ism in one country particularly uch a country as the Soviet Jnion was fully possible Thus e said he believed the fu ure possibilities for collaboration mong the nations could increase Stalin said the talk of a new war sprang from the ranks of some naive politicians who loped to prevent reduction of military budgets check demobili ation of troops and thereby pre ent the quick growth of unem loyment in their countries His answer to Worths question s to whether he believed the artiest withdrawal of all Ameri an troops from China was vital to future peace was 3 brief words Yes I do I believe he ie demilitarization and democrat zation of Germany represents one f the most important guarantees or the establishment of stable and asting peace Dies of Injuries Carroll George Peter 4 Glidden who was injured in n auto collision Sept 14 died in hospital here Monday   

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