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Mason City Globe Gazette: Friday, August 23, 1946 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - August 23, 1946, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME H I i T 0 Y A K s k 3 C H t V r 1 ISO I fit 3 THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH 10WANS NEIGHBORS VOL LJJ Associated Press and United Press Full Leased Wires Five CenU a Copy MASON CITY IOWA FRIDAY AUGUST 23 1946 This Paper Conslsls cf Two One No 273 Downed Pilot Tells of Plane Shooting Gorizia Italy pilot of the U S army transport plane forced down in Yugoslavia 2 weeks ago said Friday he failed to understand the signals of 2 Yugoslav fighter planes which later forced him down with gunfire The fighter planes flew around us a couple of times said Capt William Crombie of East Longmeadow Mass One rocked its wings I was told after I landed that that was the international signal to land but in the American and British air forces that means assembly I did not know what they meant They kept diving at us and pulling away Crombie recalled that he had flown 23 missions over Marshal Titos country during the war drop sorely needed supplies but this was his 1st flight over the ViennaUdine route on which a 2nd unarmed U S army transport was shot down last Monday with possibly 5 American fatalities Crombie was set free Thursday with 3 crewmen and 2 military and 3 civilian passengers after an angry American ultimatum was issued to Yugoslavia Crombie said one of the Yugo slav bullets went through the tail of his transport just above the left rudder gravely wounding one of the passengers a Turkish captain whose name was not disclosed The other occupants of the plane had to leave the wounded man behind in a hospital at Ljubljana headquarters of the Yugoslav 4th army Crombie said he crashlanded his plane in a small cornfield and that no else was injured The plane was wrecked The weather was bad the day we took off Crombie said in an interview closely sheperded by an American security officer who specified that the conversation be conducted as not to prejudice future handling of the United States diplomatic case against Yugoslavia We were supposed to take at a m but we were held up until There was a goad hole in the cluuds above the field then He said he was supposed to fly in a tenmile corridor from Vien na to a lake thence to Graz to Klagenfurt to Travisio and Udine I flew contact as far as the lake and then I started to climb to get above the clouds he said At 15500 feet 1 was over some of the weather It closed in and I went on instruments although there were occasional breaks in the clouds I would have gone back but it was getting worse behind He said he recognized the Aus trian city of Klagenturt and set his course slightly north of west He had his radio operator ask the Udine airport for a bearing He was deferred because the air port was working another plane So he flew west for 15 minutes until he thought he was north of Udine He was then at 16000 feet and he was passing an oxygen bottle back and forth with his co pilot Lt Bill McNew Atlanta SMASH MANLY THEFT RING Yugoslavia Files Appeal to UN Council MAKESPROTEST ON HOLDING OF DANUBE BOATS WHERE PLANES WERE locates Ljub ljana 1 near where an Ameri can plane was forced to crash land Aug 9 and point near Aus trian border 2 north of Bled where American plane was shot down Aug 21 in Yugoslavia Seven American citizens were held by Yugoslavians in a ho tel at Ljubljana Shaded area is AngloAmerican zone Yugo slavs control zone to east of Tol minoGorizia line AP Wire photo Map Ga Anderson Is Fearful of Surplus Crop By OVID A MARTIN Associated Press Staff Writer Washington lest som crops may yield surpluses nex year Secretary of Agriculture An derson is casting about for method of inducing farmers stick to government productio goals Under existing farm laws th agriculture department is require to support prices of most agri cultural commodities Specifically prices or returns t growers must be maintained a not less than 90 per cent of parity except in the case of cotton which It was then the pilot said that a fighter plane dived on us I thought it a British ship he related I said Hello on the interphone but there was no answer I continued southeast and I saw 2 other fighters From their mark ings I recognized them as Yugo slav fighters Then I knew I was over Yugoslav territory Everything happened then Then he related how a fighter rocked its wings how he failed to understand the signal and how the fighters started diving at him He continued I circled a town which I later found out was I thought might be Udine and at 14000 feet I let down That was when I saw the first burst of machinegun fire although others in the plane said there had been an earlier one I saw 6 trac ers burst Some of the bullets hit just above the left rudder There was no damage to the ship But that was when the Turkish captain was hit A bullet went through his back came out just over his heart and shattered his wrist They say he is still liv dont see how for he lost a lot of blooa Crombie said he sent the co pilot back to put the parachutes on the passengers but when the Yugoslavs dived again he decided to get down as fast as he could I picked a litle cornfield about 15 miles northwest of Ljubljana and crashlanded with the wheels up Everybody lay on the floor and nobody was hurt although the plane was badly wrecked The left motor would not stop running and I stood by with a fire extinguish er while the copilot tried to give first aid to the Turk Everybody else scattered in the field afraid they would be strafed After about 2 hours some Yugoslav officers and soldiers came and asked us why we didnt land We told them we had not understood Crombie said that 5 days before the party was liberated they were allowed to talk to an American representative who came from Belgrade The group first limited to their billet in an officers hotel was allowed to circulate as far as the terrace after 2 or 3 days Crombie said must be maintained at not less than 925 per cent Parity is the figure designed to give the farmer the same buying power he enjoyed in some past favorable period Looking to the prospect th a t world food demands on this coun try may dwindle considerably aft er this year Anderson is known to feel that these support levels may in the case of some commodities be too favorable That is they might provide an incentive which would lead farmers to produce more than is needed Some thought is being given to suggestions that the price support program be linked to a system of production controls Under these suggestions the price support pro grams would be carried out only if a farmer produced within goals set by the department Such a plan might require a re turn to prewar AAA acreage al lotments and price support sub sidies Each producer then would be given a planting allotment for the crops he normally grew And he would be assured the supporl on that portion of his crop grown on his alloted acreage A case in point is this years potato crop Because a surplus was produced last year the de partment made a slight reduction in this years support prices hop ing farmers would folloxv its rec ommendation and produce fewer potatoes Anderson would like to preven a repetition of the potato surplus and the development of other sur pluses next year The only way to do this some of his aides say is to develop a system of limiting price supports to the quantity o Note to Economic and Social Council Doesnt Mention United States New York The govern nent of Yugoslavia has appealed the United Nations economic nd social council for restitution f Yugoslav vessels held by allied military authorities on the north rn Danube The note did not pecifically mention the United States which controls the zone Announcement of the Aug 13 etter to the U N came after the Moscow radio reported that Yugo lavia had filed a complaint against the United States with the powerful security council over re urn of the ships Dr Andrija Stampar Yugoslav delegate to the U N and U N officials said they knew of no such complaint The appeal to the economic and social council said the military authorities were holding 167 ships of Jugoslav origin which the Ger mans had removed to the Upper Danube during their retreat Dr Stampar said the note writ ten Aug 9 asked that the matter be placed on the agenda for the Sept 11 meeting of the social council This is not a question for the security council he said The letter was sent to Mr Lie so that the matter could be discussed at length in connection with the problem of the reconstruction of devastated areas The United Nations confirmed that such a letter had been re ceived Aug 13 calling upon the economic and social council to study the question of Danube shipping A spokesman for Lie said that he had received no communication from Yugoslavia concerning a complaint with the security coun cil Dr Stampar said he khew of no nstructions enroute from his gov rnment requesting that the mat er be moved from the economic md social council to the security ouncil The Moscow radio in a broad ast heard in London declared hat Yugoslavia had alleged spe cifically that the United States re used to relinquish 6 Yugoslav passenger ships and other vessels Slavs Claim Turk Flight Not Accident Paris official Yugoslav spokesman said Friday the Tur kish officerpassenger on the U S transport shot down Aug 9 was being held because his flight over Yugoslavia was not accidental This coincides with a 6 word dispatch from Belgrade to the French Press agency saying that Marshal Tito had decided to reject the United States ultimatum While some terms of the ultima tum already had been met Secre tary of Stale Byrnes said the a pending all official Yugoslav affair was matter He added KITTEN RESCUED FROM DRAINPIPE 4 month old kitten doesnt realize she is being rescued not strangled by a member of the New York Citys emergency squad after she fell in a drainpipe Thursday At right rescuer smiles happily as kitten is pulled free through opening cut in pipe AP Wirephoto Hopes Fade for Safety of 5 Missing American Flyers specific products needed now anchored in the Upper Dan ube Premier Marshal Tito having complied with an angry United States ultimatum demanding the release of 7 interned Americans las given his air force the strict est orders not to fire on foreign planes again even if they happen fly over Yugoslavia without clearance Tito also has assured U S Am bassador Richard C Patterson that permission would be given American representatives to in spect both U S C47 transports shot down by Yugoslav pilots the 2ml demand in the ultimatum One plane was downed near Ljubljana on Aug 9 and the other near Bled last Monday The Yugoslav government has promised to give satisfaction U S embassy officials said after Pat tersons 2hour conference at Bled Friday with Tito concerning the ultimatum which required satis faction within 48 hours with the alternative of arraigning Yugo slavia before the United Nations Seven Americans including Lt Donald Carroll Elgin Nebr and 2 Europeans aboard the plane forced down Aug 9 were released from custody an hour before Titos conference with Patterson Weather Report FORECAST Mason City Considerable cloudi ness Friday night and Saturday with scattered light showers and somewhat warmer Satur day I o w a Considerable cloudiness Friday night and Saturday with scattered light showers Satur day Continued cool Friday night Warmer Saturday lowest Friday night 58 in east to 65 in west portion Highest Saturday near 85 Minnesota Partly cloudy and a little warmer Friday night with a few light showers Red river valley Partly cloudy and warm er Saturday with scattered showers FIVEDAY IOWA AVEATHER OUTLOOK Temperature wil average 3 to 5 degrees above normal State normal is 71 de grees Warmer Saturday little change Sunday and Monday Cooler Tuesday little change Wednesday Precipitation wil average onetenth to one quarter inch none of conse quence until light showers Monday or Tuesday IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistic for 24 hour period ending at t oclock Friday morning Maximum 78 Minimum 53 At 8 a m Friday 61 Washington for the afety of 5 American flyers shot own by Yugoslav fighters last Monday faded Friday with a state epartment report that the Yugo lav 4th army had expressed doubt any of them had parachuted o safety That note of pessimism was as thedepartment on the basis of a message from its diplo matic representatives at Belgrade fficially confirmed the release of occupants of another American army plane which was forced to crash laud Aug 9 The 2 incidents led to an ulti matum demanding that Yugoslavia release all the flyers still alive or ace an American request for prompt action by the United Na ions security council The message concerning the came from Harold Shantz charge daffaires at Belgrade it read Hohenthal Theodore Hohen thal consul at phoned at p m that the crew and pas sengers of the plane downed Aug 9 have been given liberty and the Yugoslav 4th army offered motor transport to the Morgan line rinslructcd him to accompany them to the Morgan line and de liver them to allied authorities as soon as possible Seven Americans and Z Hungarians were released The Turkish passenger is still in the hospital Hohenthal Draft Eases for Workers Professors Washington of being drafted this fall eased up key Friday for thousands of workers college professors and building craftsmen service at the request of reconversion director John Sleelman sharply modified its tough deferment requirements Heretofore none but registrants indispensable to the nations ex istence got occupational exemp tions Draft boards were authorized to give most serious consideration to occupational claims of produc tion and transportation workers come from Washington Sava Konsanovic the Yugoslav ambassador to the United States and a member of his countrys peace delegation here said in a statement As has been announced 24 hours before the American note was handed to the Yugoslav gov ernment the passengers and the members of the U S transport have been released with the ex ception of a Turkish officer whose flight over the in vestigation has not accidental Government officials in Wash ington told a reporter that if the Konsanivoc statement means the Yugoslav government wants to hold the Turkish officer the United States will object promptly and vigorously They referred to the fact that the No 1 demand of the American ultimatum to Yugo slavia was for immediate release of the occupants of the downed planes The United States made no distinction as to citizenship or na tionality FBI CAPTURES 13 MEMBERS IN RAILROAD GANG Rock Island Agents Join in Uncovering Men Looting Shipments By CARL WRIGHT GlobeGazette StafE Writer The FBI swooped down on the Rock Island railroad yards sit Manly Friday morning arid took into custody 13 mem bers of a ring that had been operating in theft from inter state shipments from freight cars to the sum of thousands of dollars in retail value over a period of time dating back to 1944 Eight of the members were employes of the Rock Island road and 5 outside re ceivers of the stolen goods according to B E Kuhnel special agent in charge of the Des JMoines office of the Fed eral Bureau of Investigation home builders and university teachers college and said that he con YEAR AGO Maximum Minimum 67 49 a Ljubljana hospital from wounds suffered by gunfire when the plane was downed The 9 released men crossed the Morgan line into Vcnezia Giulia Friday night and were taken at once to U S 68th division head quarters in Gorizia Italy They were reported in excellent physi cal condition and said they had been well treated while in cus tody Marshal Tito disclosed his cease fire orders to his air force in re sponse to a not sent him by 2 ferred with the 4th army Friday morning and that because of bad weather they decided to postpone until Saturday the visit to the plane that crashed Aug ID also graves registration men now with the ambassador may accompany him at that time The 4th army said they are doubtful whether any of the crew parachuted out They think the crew may have thrown objects overboard which peasants mistook for parachutes Earlier reports had quoted wit nesses of the crashing plane as saying they saw what they thought to be 2 members of the crew para chute as it fell They had been held in a Ljubljana American newspaper correspon representative of the As hotel for almost 2 weeks The other passenger a Turkish cap tain was reported recovering in sociated Press and one of the New York Times Previous provisions for the de ferment of some scientific students and research workers in the phy sical sciences and engineering were also somewhat broadened Selective service had no esti mate of the number of men that might now escape the draft which will be resumed next month after a 60day holiday However education officials had said that in the college field alone thousands of young instruc tors faced induction this fall un less the regulations were altered Housing officials had protested against the imminent drafting of skilled carpenters plumbers and plasterers Local boards in September must furnish 25000 men Only nonfathers 19 through 29 will be called However men as old as 44 arc eligible under the law The new order did not assure any blanket deferments Local boards will make the decisions And each applicant for an occupa tional stay must be certified as essential by an appropriate gov ernment agency PACKING STRIKE NOTICES FILED Swift Armour Wilson Cudahy Firms Named Chicago Helstein president of the CIO United Pack inghouse Workers of America said Friday that 30day strike no tices have been filed by the union against the Swift Armour Wilson and Cudahy packing companies We arc still hopeful thai a sat isfactory disposition of our differ ences can be arrived at anil that a strike can he avoided Helstein said adding that a full round of negotiations with each of the Big Four packers now has been com pleted and that no progress can be reported at this time We will continue to engage in collective bargaining for the pur pose of reaching an understand ing Helstein said We trust that the packers will enter into the conferences with the same desire to make collective bargaining work Outsiders included a locker operator a cafe operator 2 tavern operators and an in dividual FBI and Rock Island agents are continuing the investiga tion into the operations of the men and additional arrests are expected momentarily Through out the entire investigation the FBI and the officials of the Rock Island Road have worked together on the case each helping the other to uncover evidence according to Special Agent Kuhnel Taken into custody for finger printing and arraignment before U S Conurissioner Nathan Levin son were Hclmer Stavncsli 45 Manly ice house laborer with he road since 192G Clair H Miller 37 Manly ice house laborer with the road since Rex Mark Mnorc 27 Manly ice house laborer with the road since 1934 Elmond T Olson 3G Manlyice house laborer with the road since 1943 William G Haackc 26 Manly ice house laborer and extra brake man with the road since March 104G John Micliac Kelly G7 Manly switchman with the road since 1920 Irving Elmer Jones 53 Manly switchman with the road since 1921 Joseph Hall Deninger 47 Manly switchman with the road since 1923 David R Allison 57 Manly low an Named Washington ff Walter R Hutchinson a former assistant U S district attorney for the North Iowa district has been appointed assistant to Vice Admiral W W Smith chairman of the maritime commission Auto Collides With Submarine Miami Fta ff Police Desk Sergeant Jones didnt believe it when a vvomar reported an auto mobile had collided with a sub marine here Policeman D D Carver investi Charge WAC Captain Forced Manager to Open Safe With Gems Frankfurt UR Kathleen Durant WAC Capt was charged gated He jumped a reported retaining car wall had and I Friday with forcing Heinrich Lange estate manager at Kron berg castle to open the safe crammed with the jew els of the ancient house of Hesse Capt Harold H Chase Salina Kans assistant army prosecutor said the safe contineu gems placed there by Prince August Wilhelm of Prussia Chase said the jewels were stored for safekeeping just before the prince was arrested by American agents in April 1945 employe of the Iowa Slate High way Commission named as a re ceiver John Foster Clark 45 Manly owner and operator of a locker plant at Manly since 1340 Farrell W Clark 44 Manly tavern operator Marcellus G Mandl 26 Manly cafe operator George Potlriades 58 Manly operator of the Hidden Inn at Manly As far back as 1944 thefts from freight cars began to show up but officials of the road were un able to account for the thefts be cause they were not discovered until the cars reached their des Benjamin Franklin established crashed into a World war I subj the first circulating library in marine moored in the Miami river I Philadelphia in 1731 The smokestacks on some mod ern ships do not really discharge are camouflage and enclose such things as dog ken nels or ventilation shafts Bigger Troubles Are Seen Behind Row Between United States and Yugoslavia By J M ROBERTS Jr AP Foreign Affairs Analyst Although the safety of their na tionals abroad has always been a serious consideration of sovereign nations the row between the United States and Yugoslavia seems to be more a symptom of larger ills than a definitive inter national incident Under other circumstances the situation might not have provoked such an official furore There were urgency and tension in the air when the Japanese sank the Fanay too but the resultant rep resentations hardly attained the same pitch Odd as it may seem there are careful observers who believe that the RussoTurkish situation is as much or more of an issue in this case than the actual attacks on Americans They believe the United States is now beginning to accept the lines as drawn that there really are 2 worlds instead of 1 that we are firmly out to stop any further in fringement of one upon the other that this is a time of testing of seeing how far the eastern sphere is willing to pursue its own poli cies at the risk of a collision with the west They see the Yugoslavia inci dents as providing a safer means for such tests than would be of fered by a sign across the Bos porus saying Halt As these observers see it Tito acting as a front line patrol for Russia has backed down rather than have an issue drawn between the Soviet and the United States which might have disrupted the United Nations council It is taken as a sign that Russia is not yet ready to attempt more than can be done without an open break The probing is going on back and forth all along the line as witness the new RussianYugo slav agitation over Danube ship ping America keeps on trying to loosen Moscows hold on northern Korea and to fathom the Soviet aims regarding Manchuria and the communists in north China American interests are making a dcep penetration into Afghanis tan The British are moving to balance Russian pressures in the middle east There is 2 move ment apparently designed to pre serve Italy as a buffer and possi ble future ally Where some lime ago there ap peared to be an attitude on the part of the western powers to wait and judge from events just how far Russia intended to go it now appears that the attitude is one of no more regardless As for the actual attacks on American planes it is obvious that Tito would never have gotten so tough except for the stern at titude toward offcourse planes which is established Russian pol icy Some observers were talking about it Thursday as part of an innate word which originally meant hatred of for eigners but which has now come to mean also a fear of being spied upon Be that as it may there is also no question that a subtle propa ganda is being carried on in Eu rope which is spreading fear of all American airplanes America has the atomic bomb so the story goes and no one can tell when she may decide to use it the next war may start through a few innocentlooking planes There are according to new Yugo slav textbooks 2 great countries in the world Yugoslavia and Rus sia plus a fearful group of for eign nations Fear fear and distrust are the daily diet in the eastern European sphere That such a diet always will lead to incidents such as those which now have occurred is axio matic The cheering in the streets as their planes shoot down their allies who have done so much for them certainly emphasizes the state of the world But it is more import ant that the incidents have become transmission lines for far higher voltages generated elsewhere spectacle of Yugoslavs lination possibly on the east or west coast C I Demmitt chief special agent of the Rock Island road at Kansas City Mo concentrated on the increasing thefts mostly pE beer shipments and early in March 1046 located where the shortages Manly C G Graham Kansas City as sistant to the chief special agent was sent to investigate in com pany with D P Fagan Cedar Rapids and Harry L Bosworlh Manly and on July 30 1346 called the FBI info the case Working wilh Graham also was C V Mc Shanc assistant to the chief special agent Kansas City and divisional and local special agents The local resident agent of the FBI began to work on the case and immediately 3 other agents were called in to help with the investigation with the result that when the arrests were finally made Friday 8 members of the FBI were here from various parts of the state as well as Tobias Diamond U S District attorney from Sioux City Thefts from the cars were first detected in beer shipments em ployes of the road having access to the refrigerator cars for cooling by ice at various points along the line Because the ice compartment is separate from the storage com partment thefts were not readily detected until the cars reached their destinations For that reason he tracing   

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