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Mason City Globe Gazette: Monday, August 19, 1946 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - August 19, 1946, Mason City, Iowa                                NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME VOL One Mans Opinion A Radio Commentary by W EARL HALL Managing Editor BROADCAST SCHEDULE KGLO Mison City Sunday p m IVTAD gainer 111 C D S T WOI Ames Wednesday p m WSVl low City p m Civilizations Debt To Sprawling China TJOOR OLD CHINA SHE r HASNT HAD A NEW IDEA IN A THOUSAND YEAKS Thats the view of that ancient land held by the average Ameri can And its a view shared by Europeans almost universally Our socalled western civilization has developed an attitude of superiority if not contempt to ward China as a result of our own industrial revolution of the past century or two If however wed take the lime to dip into an dent be amazed bj the contributions made by thi Chinese to what is accepted a our western civilization The situation Is this Weve bor rowed extensively from China through the centuries bu If China has been slow to adopt the ideas which she might have bor rowed with profit from Europe and America rpHE earliest known gift from China to the rest of the world was silk The secret of unraveling the thread of the silk cocoon anc weaving it into cloth was discov ered by the Chinese at least 1000 years before Christ As Chinese influence cxtendec into Central Asia diplomatic en jjj voys and merchants carried silk back home with them A century before the birth of Christ silk be gan to reach the part of the world dominated by the Romans In the centuries since silk cul ture has spread to all parts of the world But for the finest silks civilization has had to go to China I is another important commodity for which the re mainder of the world stands in the debt of China In Chinas own histories the year 105 A D is given as the time ol the first sue cessfur manufacture of real paper As In the case of silk the use of paper spread along the trade routes of Central Asia first into India then intoArabia and ulti mately into Furope It wasnt until the invention of movable type and printing that the demand for paper developed in the western world on a large scale Then it was that paper quickly displaced the more ex pensive sheepskin parchment ipHE mention of printing brings up an interesting subject Most of us in America have been taught by our histories that movable type and the modern technics of printing trace back to the 15th century and a German by the name of Gutenberg But its a provable fact that the Chinese were printing books from wooden blocks as early as 868 A years before the advent of Gutenbergs movable type long before the geography of modern Europe had jelled From China the printing idea spread to Korea and westeward by the trade routes ultimately reaching Persiawnd Egypt Block printing made its first appearance in Europe soon after the Cru Prea and United Press Full Leased Wires Five Cents a Copy MASON CtTY IOWA MONDAYAUGUST 19 1946 This Paper Consists of Two One M v ot Two One No 268 EW ATTACK FAILS TO DEVELOP sades Inasmuch as the Crusaders brought back many new ideas from the Near East its more than an outside possibility that print ing was among these importations At any rate its plausible theory a reasonably HE history of the mariners compass is a bit obscured in the mists of time Its provable however that the Chinese from antiquity knew the properties of the magnetic needle and made use of it for various ceremonial pur poses By the end of the llth ceii tnry Chinese mariners were using the magnetic needle in navigation and it is the common assumption that Arab seamen borrowed this useful Instrument from the Chi nese Significantly the compass first appears in European history near the close of the 12th century riUNPqWDER is another Chi nese for which the people of that country are not too proud Its benefits to civiliza tion are extremely doubtful As early as the 6th century the Chi nese were using gunpowder for firecrackers Explosive missiles were being used in Chinese war fare by the 12th century Followingthe usual pattern the Arabs learned of Chinas strange Invention in the 13th cen tury They called saltpeter Chi nese snow and the explosive mis sile in the form ol a rocket be came a Chinese arrow in the Arabian language The exact date and method of introduction of gunpowder into Europe are not known But it seems certain it came to the west from China Europeans have taken CONTINUED ON PAGE 2 ITALIAN TREATY CAUSES PEACE PARLEY DELAY Committee on Italy in Lengthy Debate on Various Parts of Pact Paris peace confer ence went into its 4th week in low gear Monday as the Italian econo mic committee became involved in a lengthy discussion of how vari ous chapters of the Italian treaty should be divided between it anc the political committee Committees for the Finnish and Hungarian treaties also began de liberations France touched off the discus sion with a suggestion that the economic committee include on its agenda article 72 which sets up a conciliation commission in case of disputes over Italian restitution of allied property Russia supported the proposal and Deputy Foreign Minister An drei Vishinsky said it should be adopted as a general principle that all questions of a predominantly economic nature should be con sidered as falling within the com mittees scope Brazil Yugoslavia he United States Greece Belgium and White Russia all joined in the debate SETMTESFOR CE VAN HORN Mason City Policeman Killed in Cleaning Gun Funeral services for Charles E Van Horn Mason City police of ficer for 19 years who died Sun day from an accidental gunshot woundwill be held Tuesday Aft ernoon at 2 oclock at the Patter son funeral home with the Rev Wilbur F Dierking pastor of the First Presbyterian church charge Burial in Memorial Park ceme tery will be with full military tionors Officer Van Horn had 20 years of active service in the Iowa national guard and United States army Born at Boscobel Wis Feb 26 1890 he lived at Postville for a number of years before moving to Mason City in 1923 He enlisted at Charles City April 14 1917 in World war I and saw combatduty overseas He was executive officer of company F ol the national guard when the 133rd infantry of the 34th division was called to active duty in February 1941 and spent he remainder of the time with he company at Camp Claiborne La being promoted to captain He was separated from the serv ce in December for physical dis ability after spending a shorftime in the La Guarde hospital in New Orleans In 1942 he organized the state guard police battalion at Camp Dodge and served for a year as plans and training officer He is survived by his wife Ethel and 1 daughter Mrs Thel ma Long and a granddaughter also 4 sisters Mrs Iva Ringdahl Decorah Mrs Ben McGreevey Madison Wis Mrs H T Krueg er Elgin 111 and Mrs Walter Curth Milwaukee and a brother E E Van Horn Monroe Wis Officer Van Horn died as the result of a shot from his own re volver which he was about to clean in his garage Friday eve ning when it was accidentally dis charged Former members of the 34th division were asked Monday by Will Hall to meet at the funeral lome at p m Tuesday to at end the services in a body Those laving uniforms should wear hem it was suggested 8 GlobeGazette Staff Writer The little town of Wells Minn with a population of 2500 was under martial law Monday as work was started cleaning up the rub ble left in the wake of the tornado which struck the business section at p m Saturday and left destruction in property of un wards of 52000000 Berger general represen tative of the American Red Cross Minneapolis estimated the dam age with the assistance of town officials in getting priorities for building materials with which to make repairs Approximately 75 business buildings and any num ber of homes were damaged The storm struck about an hour after the twister had struck a tour ist camp at Mankato Minn kill ing 8 persons and injuring 36 Only 4 persons were known to be injured in the Wells storm and no deaths were reported despite the fact that the regular Saturday night shopping crowd had already started to form in the business district Gordon Danks city policeman was standing in front of the State theater when he saw the tornado approaching from the southwest There was a tremendous roar ac cording to Officer Danks who has been through 3 tornadoes and he realized at once it was going to strike With Ihe aid of William Heath manager of the theater they kept trict The K C buildTng covet a crowd of more than 300 persons in the theater and off the street Although the roof was torn from the back end of the theater and pitched onto the stage no one in the theater was injured When the crowd was finally al lowed to leave the theater a few moments later the street was cov ered with bricks broken glass splinters of wood and damaged cars From one end of the towns main street of Broadway to the other was a line up of damaged store fronts The other cross street Market was as badly damaged The storm apparently struck heaviest at the intersection of Broadway and Market streets the exact center of the business dis ing a quarter of a block was ut terly demolished Parked along the north side of this building were 9 cars now flattened almost to the paving by falling bricks stone and timbers On the east side of the build ing facing Broadway other cars were parked In one of these was Al Meyers of Walters Minn There was not a scratch on his car but both his legs were broken He was helped from the car by Officer Danks and was taken to a hospital at Albert Lea Minn Cecelia Benashek 17 who was employed at the home of Otto Gottfried was another victim tak en to the Albert Lea hospital She was pinned under the house which was moved from its foundation WHERE TWISTER HIT HARDESTThis aedal vew 01 the town of Wells Minn shows how the twister hit the view of t nd leavinS in its wake a mass of rubble but without takmg a single life Only 7 persons were reported 5 to the north showing how the twister The picture was Death Separates North Iowa Couple Mankato Minn sep arated a honeymooning Iowa cou Ie who had been married just one day when the tornado struck the Green Gables tourist camp on the edge of Mankato Saturday night Gerald Nurre Bancroft was tilled in the storm and his bride uffered injuries CHARLES E VANyHORN 2000 Dead in Fighting at Calcutta Calcutta and Hin dus killed each otherat a slack ned pacsJVIonday in the stinking trcets of Calcutta which in 4 lays have been strewn with 2000 o 3000 corpses The situation was the quietest mce Friday when the rival fac lons started the most ghastly riots n Calcuttas turbulent history uarreling over differences re arding the British proffer of in ependcnce Sporadic shooting continued Eerie cries rang through the streets Bodies were piled here and there many of them dead 4 days and picked by vultures Many were bloated The danger of an epidemic which might dwarf the present number of casualties mounted by the hour Several thousand lay wounded The food situation worsened as stores remained closed Looting was rife Police blot ters were filled with accounts of women sadistically raped muti lated then butchered or burned with their families One 7 year old rape victim was removed to a hospital in critical condition Waste paper is urgently needed Dont throw it away The Boy Scouts will call for it each month Dead Other storm pictures on pages 2 and 8 V List of Dead and Injured U S Plane Tllraf ATivm in mit w in Austria Is Overdue Mankato Minn of dead and injured at Mankato and Wells in Saturdays wind storms follows AT HIANKATO Mrs Lewis H Tataan 60 Man kato Minn Gerald Nurre Bancroft Iowa Donald Nelson Butterfield Nelson 33 Welcome Minn Leroy Minn Sidney Casper Mankato Mrs Alice Watland Minneapo Donald J Wirig 44 Mankato Ray Melvin 53 Mankato Injured Mr and Mrs Glen Boech and daughter Kathryn Luvernc Minn Sidney Casper 21 and son Mankato Husband Mrs Alfa Davidson 19 Corbin Kans Loren Davidson and son Gary Corbin Kans Charles Dingcr Mankato Mrs George Enns 62 Mankato Mrs Clarence Ervin 55 Dan ville 111 vilT and son Larry Dan Mrs RobertHewitt 22 Lake Crystal Minn Clifford Johnson 35 Mankato Mrs Howard Lankford 31 Mankato Mrs Hay Melvin Mankato Mr and Mrs Paul McClellan Marion Ind each 50 Mrs Gerald Nurre Bancroft Iowa Husband Mrs Delia Peterson 30 Man kato Mr and Mrs Lawrence Polinski and daughter Patsy Eagle Lake Minn Eda J Reed Mankato Mrs Regina Sandvik Mankato Valene Sandvik Mankato Miss Marie Sandberg 21 Ma delia Minn Louis H Tatmah 68 Mankato Mr and Mrs Richard Tetman and baby Katherine no address Alle Watland 58 Minneapolis Lester Watts 33 Mankato camp resident Mr and Mrs Elmer Walter Mapieton Minn AT WELLS Injured Alfred Meyer 44 Walters Minn fractures of both legs Cecelia Banashak 17 Wells shock and bruises Mrs Bert Olson 34 leg lacera tion Mrs Walter Brandenburg 19 cut right hand Weather Report FORECAST Mason Monday night and Tuesday night Cooler Monday Iowa Fair Monday night and Tuesday Cooler Monday night Not so cool in west portion Tuesday afternoon Minnesota Fair and cooler Mon day night Fair Tuesday except partly cloudy with a few scat tered showers northeast and ex treme north portion Continued cool Tuesday IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics for 24 hour period ending at 8 oclock Sunday morning Maximum 84 Minimum 54 At 8 a m Sunday 68 Precipitation 14 YEAR AGO Maximum gg Minimum 50 GlobeGazette weather statistics for 24 hour period ending at 8 o clock Monday morning Maximum 77 Minimum 51 At 8 a m Monday S3 YEAR AGO Maximum 57 Minimum gl Trieste American army plane enroute from Vienna to Udme was hours overdue Monday afternoon anci the last message from the plane said tracer bullets were streaking past it This came a day after official disclosure that another American transport flying the same Austria Italy route was forced down Aug 3 in Yugoslavia by Yugoslav fight er planes which fired bursts of machine gun fire into it wounding a passenger The plane overdue Monday was assigned to the European air transport service It left Vienna at a m and was reported over Klagenfurt Austria at a m At that rate it should have reached Udine airport for the British American zone of Venezia Giulia at a But at a m the plane radioed that tracer bullets were passing it After that there was silence OPA Boosts Refrigerator Retail Price Washington Monday authorized a retail price increase of approximately 6 per cent for household mechanical refrigera tors On a standard box OPA an nounced the Increase will be from to Consumers will pay the higher prices OPA said as soon as deal ers receive refrigerators ticketed with the new ceilings during the storm She was just going into the basement when the storm struck the house and it was some time before she could be released Cast Harold Schulenburg of the fire department was standing in the doorway of the firehouse which is next to he theater when the storm hit He said he was amazed to see automobiles in the street lifted into the air 4 and 5 feet and bounced along the paving hfee rubber balls Light poles and telephone lines were twisted and snapped but the throwing of the main switch at Wells electric plant saved anyone from being electrocuted and pre vented fires from starting Street lamps which are operated on a separate underground circuit re mained buring throughout the night News of the tornado spread rap idly as people left the town in carsand stories several hund red people trapped in the theater A service company of the 3rd infantry regiment of the Minne sota state guard was hurridly called into action at Albert Lea and dispatched in 2 trucks un der the command of Capt C O Wilde The company took over upon ar rival about 10 p m and posted guards about the business district No one was allowed beyond the roped areas except press photog raphers newspapermen and wom en ana radio newsmen who came from various points in Minnesota and Iowa At from Fairmont dawn regiments and Austin re lieved those on guard and doubled the strength of the guard for Sun day to prevent the public from entering the damaged area The Minnesota state highway patrol placed a guard on Highway 12 which runs north and south through tne residential part of the town and the state highway de partment began working imme diately clearing twisted and broken trees and hanging wires from the highway By dawn this highway had been cleared far traffic while on both sides were the piles oJ wreckage left by the storm In tiie area where the tornado first appeared to have dipped St Catherines Catholic church was badly damaged This is just across the street from the Wells high school building which es caped with broken windows and slight damage About 50 persons attending Catholic church services hustled to the basement at the start oi the storm Shortly afterward 2 portions of the roof caved in The parochial school near the chuich alsa was damaged torn off The roof was Harvey Wedin was one of the maividual property owners most heavily hit his house being torn from its foundation his commer cial garage being destroyed z service station operated separately ay him being demolished and his old blacksmith shop leveled to the ground In the alley in back of Wedins opme 7 garages were torn from neir foundations and pulverized oy the storm This destruction was more or less typical through out the closein residential dis nct Near the outskirts of the own there was barely a trace of the storm The 3 hotels in the city were sadly damaged although some pa trons remained in them through out the night The Wells hotel was hit the hardest the roof and part of the building being torn off A beauty shop operated at the rear of the building was demolished Next o this was the Jacobson mplement company a 2 story building uhich was a single story Pile of stone cement and bricks when the storm had finished This was across the alley to the west from he K C building which vas heavily damaged Stores damaged in the K C milding were Seegars bakery the Schute hardware store J C Pen ney company the Wiede drug and the DeLux cafe which continued to operate and fed the soldiers of the state guard Eroil Lang SO known to the people of Wells as Santa Claus always came to town on Saturday night for his weekly ice cream cone He was just entering the toor of the DeLuxe cafe when the omado took the front end of he building away Lang got and had his cone On the 2nd floor of the K C juilding was the dance hall but he tornado hit before the dance crowd had gathered The apart ment of Mrs Marie Hanson on the corner of the 2nd floor of the building was demolished On the north side of Market street cars which had been parked by evening shoppers were piled on top of one another One car in which 2 Mexicans were sitting m front of a beer parlor was whisked up Broadway for a block and a half and the rear of it slammed into the side of a build ing The Mexicans got out in a hurry but unhurt GENERAL CALM IN PALESTINE AFTER RIOTING British Clamp Rigid Control on Haifa After Tumultuous Weekend Haifa Palestine nation wide offensive which three under ground Jewish groups were re ported preparing Monday failed to materialize by early evening and a comparative quiet settled upon a still tense Holy Land after a troubled weekend The only unusal Incident up to 4 p m was another operation scram at the Jerusalem postoffice which was evacuated for 40 min utes when an anonymous tele phone call warned the place was to be bombed This rapidly was becoming routine in a war of nerves The general calm since Sunday encouraged some of the moderate Jewish leaders to predict that a corner had been turned in Pales tines turbulent history and that terrorism might be on the down grade here British troops held a rigid cor don around Haifas port area fol lowing Sundays disorders in which illegal immigrants attempt ed to scuttle the transport carry ing them to Cyprus The first infantry division using Bren carriers mounted guard in this city after the Cyprusbound transport Empire Heywood re turned to Haifa following the un successful attempt to scuttle her Sunday The British had used tear gas and fire hoses to drive 64O illegal immigrants from the transport Fenice on which they arrived here from Europe last week on to the Empire Haywood for tranship ment to a refugee camp being pre pared for 10000 persons on Cy prus The Empire Heywood finally left port Sunday morning but re turned less than an hour later after 2 small bombs exploded in her hold U S Charges Yugoslavs in Allied Zone Washington ff The United States charged publicly Monday that on July 12 Yugoslav troops illegally entered the allied zone around Trieste and fired without provocation upon American forces investigating their presence The American view of the clash was madeknown with the release by the state department of a note delivered to the Yugoslav foreign office last Thursday The note emphatically rejected the distor tion of evidence alleged in Yugo slavias earlier complaint about the incident At the same time the state de partment made public a 3 months old rejection of Yugoslav com plaints about American and Brit ish administration of the allied BELIEVE DEATH FALL ACCIDENT Clear Lake Dubuque Men Are Questioned Davenport Capt Harold Thordsen Monday ex pressed the belief that the death of a 33 year old Davenport woman who was found nude in an alley after she plunged from a 3rd story window of a hotel early Sunday was accidental Police Chief Reed Phillips iden tified the woman as Mrs Cath erine Guzc a sales clerk and mother of a 2 year old girl He said the fall occurred after a drinking party at the hotel Capt Thordsen said An im orint on the window sill indicated that Mrs Guze was sitting there when she leaned against the and plunged into the alley He added that foul play was not Phillips said Robert Webb 38 of Clear Lake and Frank Nelson 39 of Dttbuque were being held for questioning in connection with icr death but that no charges have been filed Terminal Leave Pay 3Ianks at Postoffice Application blanks for terminal cave pay were received Monday by the Mason City postoffice and will be available to former scrv ccmcn at any of the windows ac cording to Postmaster A M Schanke   

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