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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: July 13, 1946 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - July 13, 1946, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME CQHf DEPARTMENT QF RY AH9 ARCHIVES I A VOL UI Ataodated PMM and United Press Full Leased Wires THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS Five Cents a Cojy MASON CITY IOWA SATURDAY JULY 13 1946 This Paper Consists ot Two SectionsSection 6aa No SENATE PASSES OPA REVIVAL BILL WILLIAM HEIRENS Fingerprints Match Link Heirens in Lipstick Murder Case Chicago Heirens youthful suspect in the kidnap slayingof Suzanne Degnan was under a 24 hour a day surveillance at county jail Saturday after au thorities decided he was too dan gerousto be left unguarded Heirens 17 described by Chief of Detectives AValter Storms as The greatest criminal of his age in Chicago annals was linked through fingerprints Friday with the Dec 10 lipstick death of ex WAVE Frances Brown States attorney William J Tuohy said the youths finger prints had Been found to check on I 22 points with prints found in Miss Browns northside apartment Nine of the points were on the first joint of the finger and 13 on the second Tuohy said Chief Storms was elated at the discovery which he saidrdefinite ly put Heirens at the scene of the crime He said the prints had been sent to the federal bureau of in vestigation at Washington for con firmation After being advised of the new J discovery Warden Frank G Sain I removed Heirens from his cell in 1 a regular tier block at the county jail to the observation tier where he will be under constant observa I iion The youths finger and palm print earlier had been matched with those found on a ran som note left in the kidnaping of 6 yearold Suzanne Degnan Parts of the little giris dismembered body were found in sewers after she taken from her room last Jan 7 Heirens paled when told of the evidence linking him to the WAVE murder A reporter told the young Uni versity of Chicago student about the fingerprint discovery and he started to speak Attorney John P Cpghlan interrupted however and said As your lawyer I advise you to say nothing In recent years the percentage of waste in oil wells has been cut from about 80 to approximately 25 per cent Weather Report FORECAST Mason City Clear skies Saturday night Sunday partly cloudy Continued warm and becoming more humid Iowa Partly cloudy Saturday and Sunday with thundershowers in the northwest and extreme west portions Warmer Saturday night Quite warm and more humid Sunday Minnesota Partly cloudy Satur day and Sunday with widely scattered thunder showers north and west portions Continued warm IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics for 24 hour period ending at 8 oclock Saturday morning Maximum gg Minimum 57 At 8 a m Saturday 76 YEAR AGO Maximum Minimum 55 WILD GAR TAKES FLYING LEAP Hits Telephone Pole 15 Feet Above Ground An automobile which had just sideswiped another took off from the shoulder of highway 65 4 of Mason City early Saturday morning and clipped off a telephone pole 15 feet above ground Sheriff Tim Phalen re ported after investigating the ac cident Marks on the pole as well as the break showed where the car hit it he said The sheriff said that the car driven by Grant Miller 507 fllon roe N W sideswiped one driven by Mrs Mary Smith Mason City continued northwestward across the paving and shoulder of the road and hen traveled through theair for approximately 15 feet before hitting the pole It then dropped to the ground landing on its top Miller was ap parently unhurt but 2 passengers Mrs Eleanor Weaver 1517 K Madison and Mrs Dorothy Lang 633 Jefferson S W both were taken to Mercy hospital where their condition was reported Sat urday as not serious In the car with Mrs Smith was her brother Clarence Shipley and her 4 year old son Gary One of Shipleys legs was slightly injured and Gary suffered minor cuts about the face according to the sheriff The car went off the east side of the road south of the bvWge and turned over in a 15 foot ditch Waste paper is urgently needed Dont throw it away The Boy Scouts will call for it each month House Refuses to Reduce British Loan MEMBERS VOTE AGAINST MOVE ON COLLATERAL Motion to Kill Bill Defeated in Lower Chamber by 180 to 19 Washington house re fused Saturday by a voice vote to reduce the proposed loan to Britain from to 250000000 Immediately hereafter the members also rejected by a 168 to 112 standing vote an amend ment to require collateral for funds granted Defeat of the proposals repre sented another smashing victory for the administration Earlier the house defeated 180 to 19 a motion by Rep Celler D N Y to kill the loan ratification bill The amendment to slash the proposed grant was by Rep Ben der R It received only a scattering of votes and only a few members spoke on it The collalerial proposal by Rep Dirksen R was debated vigorously for nearly 2 hours and was one of the key offerings of loan opponents Dirksen asserted that the only sensible way to loan money is to demand security for it The house defeated his amend ment however after loan sup porters declared its approval would break the entire financial agreement with Britain Celler had moved to strike out everything after the enacting clause in the legislation Thehouse then moved toward a final sHowddVri on This test on the Celler motion camo shortly after Speaker Ray burn D Tex personally ap pealed to the house to ratify the credit lest England and western Europe be pusned into an ideol ogy I despise As the house assembled to cast its crucial vote on the ratification legislation already approved by the senate Rayburn arose and declared World leadership is offered us today Voices throughout the world are crying for American democracy to lead Will we seize that leadership or will we allow somebody else to seize it If that happens God pity us and God pity the people of other nations Set No Publicity Rule on Palestine Discussion London foreign office said Saturday that absolutely no publicity will be given to dis cussions of the AngloAmerican talks on Palestine Since this is a conference of experts it was decided to give ab solutely no publicity to their pro ceedings a spokesman said Conferees met Saturday to open discussion of 10 recommenda tions of the AngloAmerican Pal estine commission report Byrnes Wants Another Big 4 Council After Peace Meeting 1 1T7F Russia and Western Allies in Dispute on Plan for Germany Paris of State Byrnes declared Saturday he wanted another foreign ministers council to take place immediately after the impending peace confer ence adopts the peace treaties His intention to urge another foreign ministers session prior to the United Nations meeting in New York tentatively set for Sept 23 was disclosed at a press con ference before he enplaned for Washington Reviewing the councils work Byrnes remarked that internation alization of Trieste would be a good experiment in international cooperation Byrnes said he had not hesitated to accept compromises on the European peace treaties because if we had not gotten a treaty we would have had a clash that no body wants Therefore we did not hesitate wherever there was any possibility to reach a reconcilia tion Concerning Trieste he staled the nations of the world have entered into what is a great ex periment that should determine whether it fs possible for the United Nations in a situation of this kind to reach a solution Byrnes said he would broadcast in the United States Monday night Senators Vandenberg and Conally D will re port to the senate next week Byrnes said no decision had been taken on the composition of the American peace conference dele gation He said he would discuss it with the 2 senators while en route to Washington and later would take up the matter with President Truman Byrnes plane roared down the Orly field runway at p m bound for Iceland and then Wash ington There were some indications that the adjournment of the con ference Friday night marked a parting of the ways between Rus sia and the western allies on the administration and future of Ger many Soviet Foreign Minister V M Molotov refused to support a United States plan for a central economic administration for Ger many This proposal was backed by French Foreign Minister Georges Bidault in a remarkable concession when he agreed to go along with Byrnes if the coalrich Saar was not included Molotov asked further time to study the by Britain and the United States that the Saar be placed under French supervision GIsKin2 Yugoslavs in Border Fight Gorizia Italy U S 88th division announced Saturday that an American army patrol killed 2 Yugoslav soldiers in skirm ishes Friday after a Yugoslav pa trol opened fire when it was caught west of the Morgan line The line divides the British American zone from the Yugoslav zone of occupation in disputed Venezia Giulia It extends north from Punta Grossa a prominent headland 4 miles south of Trieste to Gorizia Caporctto and Ratece on the ItalianYugoslavAustrian border The 88th divisions headquarters said the skirmishes developed after the Yugoslavs crossed the line near Aurisinia in the Isonzo river valley southeast of Caporetto which is itself 22 miles north of Gorizia American troops in the zone were ordered on the alert The official statement saidr At approximately 1600 hours GMT Greenwich mean time on July 12 a Yugoslav patrol which crossed the Morgan line near Aur isinia southeast of Caporetto was sighted by a United States outpost An Americanofficered patrol which immediately investigated the violation of the line was fired on by the Yugoslavs at a point ap proximately 30 yards from the Morgan line in zone A Acting on instructions to fire only when fired upon the United States patrol returned the fire Alter a brief exchange of firing one of the Yugoslav soldiers was found dead The United States patrol con tinued to advance until another Yugoslav patrol was encountered which apparently was intent on ambushing the United States pa trol Another brief firefight fol lowed after which the Yugoslavs retired The American patrol returned to Aurisinia where it was ascer tained that there were no United Slates casualties All actions definitely took place in zone A and American troops in Caporetto and Aurisinia have been alerted while further investigation is being made Later reports confirmed by 88th division headquarters state that a 2nd Yugoslav soldier was killed in the latter part of the ac tion Irish Bankers Strike Belfast ff All of northern Irelands banks were closed Sat urday by a strike of 1450 em ployes demanding wage increases and improved working conditions About 100 banks were affected CLARENCE K if Recapture Prisoner After Escape From Cedar Rapids Court Cedar Rapids fleetfoot ed prisoner who was too fast for a deputy sheriff and escaped shortly after he had been sent enced in district court on a forg ery charge was recaptured Friday night Clarence Kriz 22 who deputy sheriff Larry Condon said was too fast for me made his break as Condon was returning him to the county jail Friday after he had been sentenced to an indetermin ate sentence of 10 years to Fort Madison penitentiary Condon said Kriz whirled and ran around the southeast corner of the courthouse and ran across the plaza and caught a bus Highway Patrolmen John Schneider and H R Erts captured Kriz on highway 30 near Lisbon He was riding in a Cedar Kapids taxi FOURTH SET OF TWINS31 year old Mrs Irma Griser proudly holds her 4th set of twins her husband Arthur 38 nurses another pair 1 year old The other twins 3 and 5 Wre lioto a ei chitdren in a11 They live in Pitcairn Pa AP SKINNER KILLS MEAT INSPECTOR Fight Follows Dispute Over Carcass Grading Des Moines marine vet eran of Iwo Jima was stabbed to death Friday following an alter cation at the Iowa Packing Co over the grading of hog carcass Detective Chief Paul Castelline said Castelline said Carroll Skect cr Hall 28 Neero skinner at the plant was held for investigation after Hubert J Mackey 27 a government meat inspector died of knife wounds enroute to a hos pital No charges had been filed The detective said the stabbing occurred after Mackey had placed a rejection tag on a carcass skinned by Hall Mackey who had been a gov ernment inspector at the plant since 1940 except for 2 years spent in the marines suffered knife wounds in his left forearm his left hip across his abdomen and in his left shoulder and neck Death was caused by the sever ing of an artery in the neck Coro ner A E Shaw saiS The weapon used was a skin ners knife with a narrow pointed 7inch blade Mackey who lived with his wife Margaret and his 8 year old son Richard on the Fort Des Moines housing project was wounded in the invasion of Iwo Jima and suffered the loss of sight in his left eye He was discharged from the marines last September Detectives said Mackey had been in charge of inspection of the whole 5th floor trimming room Daves Dream Pilot Father of Baby Boy Tampa Fla about 10 years a boy bom at the hospital here Friday nightwill be able to stop all the other kids in his neigh borhood when they start brag ging about the prowess of their fathers My old man piloted the ship that dropped the atom bomb on Bikini this youngster can truth fully boast A boy wasborn to Maj and Mrs Woodrow P Swanscutf of Wisconsin Rapids Wis here Fri day night just 26 hours after Swanscutt had flown his army bomber Daves Dream into Tam pafrom Bikini Swanscutt must report to Ros well N Mex Monday but the heir arrived right on schedule and the army man was able to be pres ent when his son was born after a long dash from the Pacific The Swanscutts have 2 daughters Wendie 4 and Carolyn 2 Population increase during the past 5 years almost equaled the increase in the 10 years prior to 1940 according to the census bu reau Old New OPA Comparison Washington The OPA revival bill passed early Saturday by Provisions in the new bill not contained Ju the oW would Exempt from price controls livestock meat poultry butter and dairy products cottonseed soybeans and their products gram and livestock or poultry feed made from it tobacco and its products Free petroleum and its products from control except when a de control board found the short of domestic demand Bar federal rent ceilings states having rent controls Forbid OPA to enforce price differentials between textile firms which handle cotton from raw to finished product and those which do not Forbid the commodity credit corporation to pay more than 3675 cents a pound for imported sugar Give southern pine used for pulp as high a ceiling as any other pine used for that purpose Allow at least current produc tion costs on SO per cent of logs lumber and lumber products Make the new measure effec tive as of last June 30 the date the old OPA act expired 2Identical provisions in both old and new bills would Continue OPA until next June Transfer price controls over farm commodities to the secretary independent 3 30 of agriculture Establish an VJ U C man decontrol board which could approve higher price ceilings than either the price administrator or ncretary of agriculture recom ended Grant an additional 000 for food subsidies ban any food subsidies after next April 1 Guarantee automobile and ap pliance dsalers full prewar mar gins and discounts until sales re turn to the 193941 average Kill OPAs maximum average price regulation intended to as sure a supply of lowpriced cloth ing 3 On 2 major points a pricing formula for manufacturers and discounts and markups for whole salers and retailers the new and old bills differed this way The new bills pricing formula for manufacturers producers pro cessors service and transportation industries says prices must be high enough to return on the average the 1940 price plus any cost in creases sincethen But OPA coulri make reasonable adjustments to meet abnormal production And in cases where ctilings were high enough to cover costs it could re fuse to raise them if this a would not boost production or b would reduce production of other necessary items The old bills formula said ceil ings would have to assure individ ual producers processors and manufacturers excluding service and transportation price levels equal to those of he first half of October 1941 plus any subsequent weighted average increase in unit costs throughout the industry The new bills discounts and markups for wholesalers and re tailers would be those in effect June 29 1946 The old bill set the date at Jan 1 1946 War Profits Probers Refuse to Accept Mays Conditions Congressman Wants Council and Right to CrossExam Witnesses Washington senate war investigating committee blunt ly informed Hep May D Saturday that it could find no al ternative to the conclusion that he is unable to explain or contradict facts linking him to a munitions combine it is investigating In a strongly worded letter to the chairman of the house military committee the senate committee refused to accept the conditions he laid down for a personal appear ance before the investigators Stripped of its ands and buts the plain and simple import of your Mays letter is that you decline to appear before the com mittee to face and explain the facts that have been presented the letter said The committee has sought to lind an alternative to the conclusion that you admit to account frequently fully openly No possession should them It cannot find any such al ternative The letter added We all are public servants As such the citizenry and its repre sentative bodies of which we are members are entitled to an ac counting of our stewardship of the trust we have accepted This should induce us to seek and more precious than trie confidence of the public in the integrity and devotion to duly of a representa tive of the people in a democracy When wrongfully challenged we should rush to defend that in tegrity May has been described by army officer witnesses as being persist ent m helping the war contract business of a group of companies m which the Garsson brothers Henry and Murray were active The congressman indicated Fri day he was willing to testify pub licly if allowed to have his own MEASURE DUE WORKING OVER IN CONFERENCE 3 Day Delay in House Looms Senators Keep Restrictions on Rent Washington OPA re vival bill carrying a long list price control exemptions passed the senate 69 to 15 early Satur day and went to the house There a 3day delay before further ac tion is taken appeared likely Final passage came at a m on the 13th day ol OlAs lapse into a legal coma Ap proval was obvious almost from the moment that the roll call of weary senators started 6 minutes earlier Apparently amended far be yond the bounds which would permit its acceptance by President Truman the 1year extension measure was sent to the house But there was no prospect for quick action in that branch where the British loan currently has the right of way Administration leaders said the parliamentary situation was such that the house probably could not even send the price measure to a senatehouseconference commit tee before Tuesday Should that be the next step administration members hope to rewrite it from tip to roots Rep Wolcott of Michigan top republican of the banking com mittee said an effort might be made to substitute for it the orig inal extension bill President Tru man vetoed June 29 Wolcott said the first bill appeared stronger than the latest senate measure As It floundered through a sleepy senate the new measure would revive QPA and restore price control ceilings as of Juno 30 It would reinstate rent con trols with the proviso that states lake over in this field where they have adequate laws Price controls however would not be replaced on meat poultry eggs butler cheese milk or other dairy products cotton seed soy Wilsons Vote Washington fP Senator George Wilson RIowa voted against the OPA extension bill which was passed by the senate early Saturday Earlier Wilson was one of 12 senators who approved propos al by Senator Robertson R VVyn to limit the powers of a revived OPA to rent control alone This was beaten 6112 On other OPA legislation Wil son voted with the majority for adoption of an amendment to the price control extension bill which would exempt grains and livestock and poultry feeds made from grain from price ceilings Wilson voted against a pro posal by Senator Pepper D Fa to revice OPA authority without major changes until June 30 1947 It was defeated ho rfTfl thatyU 3dmit COUnseI and Canted the right to those facts to be true that you are crossexamine and recall wit unable to explain or contradict nesses beans grain livestock or poultry feed nor on any torm of tobacco Petroleum would have no ceilings as long as supply meets domestic demands Reinstated were some of the provisions to which President Tru man objected when he vetoed OPA extender bill No 1 on June 29th These included a section giving final say on the lifting of food controls to the secretary of agri culture instead of OPA which Mr Truman said was an unsound split of authority It contained also what he called cost plus amendments for automobile and appliance dealers and lacked an additional in subsidies he asked In one major respect however it was more satisfactory to admin istration leaders than bill No 1 The senate put in provision re quiring that producers manufac turers and processors ceilings be Placed hieh enough to take care of the average increase in costs in their industry since 1940 This was substituted for a pro vision inserted in the original bill by Senator Taft ROhio which Mr Truman had labelled as the most damaging section of that measure The apparent administration strategy was to take this measure direct to a senatehouse commit tee without further action by the house itself now There it would be matched with a 20day exten sion oE OPA powers voted by the house previously and joined to gether under rules that would permit almost any sort of final compromise Senator ODaniel DTejr who had threatened previously to delay passage of the bill with par lilamentary maneuvers said in a 40 minute speech starting at 1210 a m CST that he hoped the bill would come back to the sen ate from the conference commit   

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