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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: May 29, 1946 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - May 29, 1946, Mason City, Iowa                                NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME CQMP DEPARTMENT OP HlSTOfiY AH3 ARCHIVES VOL m Associated Press and United Prtsi rull Leased Wires Five CeoU a Copy THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES AVL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS MASON WEDNESDAY MAY 29 1916 No 19 j COAL STRIKE SETTLEMENT IS NEAR Senator Ellender Says Truman Determined to Get His Bill Through Washington W The house Wednesday passed President Truman and the sent to senates version of the Case strikecontrol bill Passage was by a roll call vote of Z30 to lOB slightly more than the twothirds majority required to override a veto if the president rejects the measure The senate voted 49 to 29 for the bill last Saturday The party breakdown on the roll call vote democrats and 132 republicans for the measure 91 democrats 13 republicans and 2 minor party members against it As rewritten by the senate the measure contains a prohibition against employer contributions to unionadministered welfare funds and provides for a 60day pre strike cooling off periods Amid veiled hints that its action would bring a veto the house rammed the legislation through by a rollcall vote after 2 hours of debate Congressional action on the con troversial Case bill was completed as the senate neared a vote on the presidents request for emer gency legislation to draft strikers who refuse to work for the gov ernment Senator EHender D told reporters alter a white bouse call that Mr Truman was determined oil haviu the emerreneypowers be requested in a speech before congress last Saturday Ellender said he called to assure MrTruman of his own support for the draftstrikersprogram laid down by the president in speech to congress Saturday his On his own part Ellender said he felt the president should have sufficient power to protect the country from internal enemies and from uncontrollable labor leaders He declared that a nation which can draft men to fight enemies on the outside should be able to protect itself from situations at home The senate agreed to vote late Wednesday afternoon on the ques tion of knocking the draftstrikers provision from President Trumans emergency labor legislation The agreement asked by Ma jority Leader Barkley came amid indications by an Associated Press poll that the senate would not accept the draft provision Barkley also obtained an agree ment for a limitation of debate on the measure as a whole to 30 min utes for each senator In view of that agreement he told the senate he would not in sist on a night session or on meet ing Thursday Memorial day The limitation of debate assured sen ate action within a few days Adm Hustvedt to Give Memorial Day Address at Decorah Thursday Vice Admiral Olaf Mandt Hustvedt of the U S navy on whom Luther college conferred the honorary degree of doctor of science at Mondays convocation will deliver the Memorial day ad dress here Thursday He is a guest of his sisters and brothers Survey Shows Defeat for Truman Bill Washington resident Trumans strikedraft plan faces almost certain defeat in the senate if the coal dispute is settled quick ly an Associated press poll showed Wednesday Of 63 senators willing to state their position 45 said they are op posed to that section of the house passed emergency bill which would empower the president to induct into the army those who strike in governmentseized in dustries Eighteen senators an nounced their support of the pro posal The senate began its 2nd day of debate on the measure Wednes day At the same time the house rules committee was expected to clear the way for early action by hat body on the senates version of the socalled Case labor dis putes bill The 45 senators lined up against he draft section of the emergency measure passed by a dramatic 305 o 13 house vote last Saturday in clude 20 democrats 24 republicans and a progressive They represent a bloc only 3 short of a 48 major ty now that there is one vacancy h the senate Moreover there seemed little loubt that when the coal dispute s settled and the Industrial scene quiets even temporarily the mar gin for defeat of the draft provi sion would be supplied from among 14 democrats and 11 re publicans who decline to commit themselves publicly right now In fact 5 of these told reporters hat if the proposal ever comes to a vofe they will oppose it while 2 said they will support it Six democrats and a republican could not be reachedin the poll All were out of the city Senators Wheeler and OlWahoney DWyoj were reportedto have urged Btr Tru maii at a white conference Tuesday to withdraw his entire emergency bill if an agreement is reached In the coal controversy Comments included Senator Wherry I intend to uphold the president in every way I can but I cannot vote for the draft section of the bill Hickenlooper There will have to he some amendments to the bill Strong methods have to be taken but I am not sure drafting into Hie army is necessarily the answer Wilson will not go along with it as It is House Votes for Senates Version of Case Measure BILL NOW GOES TO PRESIDENT FOR APPROVAL Army Ordnance Plants Are Put Up for Sale Washington war as sets administration Wednesday hung a for sale or lease sign on 6 army ordnance plants in 5 states The plants are located at Jack sonville and Hope Arlc and Bar aboo Wiv Prairie Miss Choteau Okla and Point Pleasant W Va 1 The war assets administration said most of the acreage involved was classified as industrial prop erty but that some might be found suitable for such purposes as graz ing housing or institutional uses In such cases it said sufficient space will be alloted lor expansion by the prospective purchaser The Wisconsin property 1058 acres known as the Badger ord nance works was operated by Hercules Powder company to pro duce rocket and smokeless pow der About 1800 Blackbird anom aha Indian chief was buried sit ting on his favorite horse OPA Boosts Price of Cantaloupe Melons Washington UR OPA an nounced Wednesday a centa pound increase in the retail price of cantaloupe and honey ball melons The increase follows an axer age 425 cent increase in the standard crates packed by grow ers OPA granted the price boosts to compensate growers for in creases in parity and packing costs The increases per crate F O B shipping points in California and Arizona for the season Jan 1 through July 5 are Standard crate compared with at the old price jumbo crate compared to the old price of 395 and pony crate com pared to the old price of It is estimated that for every American 241 pounds of paper products are consumed each year Weather Report FORECAST Mason City Scattered thunder showers Wednesday night and Thursday becoming cooler Thursday Iowa Scattered thundershowers in west and south portions Wed nesday night and in most sec tions of the state Thursday be coming cooler Thursday Minnesota Mostly cloudy with showers and thunderstorms late Wednesday night and Thursday Continued warm Wednesday night becoming cooler Thurs day IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics for 24 hour period ending at 8 oclock Wednesday morning Maximum 31 Minimum 47 At 8 a m Wednesday 61 YEAR AGO Maximum 59 Minimum 52 BALL PARK AND NEW HOMES HIT BY OVERFLOW ING from the overflowing Chemung river 4 feet above the flood stage fill the ball park of the Elmira N Y team of the Eastern baseball league and surround new homes in the area More than a third of the city was inundated AP Wirephoto Byrnes Says US Working Washington of State Byrnes told congress Wed nesday that the United States is oing to work for limitation of arms among the nations of world the 10 Missing as Flood Waters H it Eastern States ME ASSOCIATED PRESS death and destruction in its wake thr dugh northcentral Pennsylvania and southern New York the rampaging Susquehanna river flood crest surged southward Wednesday after overflowing its banks into cities and rich farmlands At least 10 persons drowned and 4 others were missing in the muddy started rising rapidly fllonday night after 4 days of almost continuous Estimates of damage exceeded exceeueu Byrnes enunciated this policy in Thousands were iiomc testinwny hefore the house foreign affairs committee He said details have not been worked outi but the government is going to work for limitation oE We desire to see the world free from the fears and burdens which unnecessarily large armed forces would impose on the peoples of the world Byrnes declared He made the statement with out further elaboration after urg ing congressional approval of leg islation providing for a broad pro o military cooperation with other American nations As he went before the commit tee American officials looked lo Moscow for Russian reaction to Byrnes denial Tuesday of For eign minister Sloloiovs charges against him and the United States rrowing out of the foreign min isters conference in Paris Byrnes denial raised the ques tion What will be its effect or less The U S weather bureau in Harrisburg Pennsylvanias capi tal announced a crest of 317 feet than 9 feet above flood reached at Wilkes Barre and said the waters were near this peak in Sunbury miles downstream There the river was 7 feet over its banks and had cut the community of 14000 prac tically in two A level of 225 Teet was pre dicted for Harrisburg sometime Wednesday night Streets there already were flooded in low ly ing areas and more families have been than 100 evacuated The swirling waters of Susquehamm river raced Some arterial highways have been cut by rising waters the vir tually out of control striking hardest at Williamsport Eyewit nesses said this central Pennsyl vania community of 43000 lay helpless AVednesday in the most crippling flood since 193G The raging river crested at 31 tfusso American relation 5 inches at Williamsport late ready strained and on chances for early peace in Europe The military cooperation program which Byrnes endorsed before the house committee was contained in a bill proposed to congress May 6 by President Trti man It would permit transfer of arms to the other American re publics It also would authorize the United States to help train mili tary and naval personnel in those countries and to Kelp repair their equipment Byrnes declared that the pro gram would not stimulate an arms race Tuesday night 85 feet above flood level Eighty per cent of the citys industries are floodbound 60 per cent of the residential areas are awash in several feet wa ter Elmira N Y looked old man Chemung a Susque hanna tributary right in the face One third of the community its 50000 residents battling the raging torrents at every turn was under more than 5 feet of water Utilities were disrupted All roads but one closed The flood inNew York centered here As waters in upstate New York receded but continued to rise in Pennsylvania communities furth 14 DACHAU CAMP OFFICIALS DIE Nazis Are Sent to Gallows in Pairs Landsbergr Germany last of 28 Dachau concentration camp officials sentenced to death for atrocities were hanged Wed nesday within sight of the fortress prison where Adolf Hitler wrote Mein Kampf Two at a time the last 14 con demned nazi tough men mounted the gallows beeinning at 6 a in Thr first group of 14 were ex ecuted Tuesday All the condemned men were convicted killing beating and otherwise torturing inmates of the Dachau camp and its satellites An American army executioner Muster Sgt John Woods of San Antonio Tex and a German hangman worked side by side as the victims walked in pairs to the gallows Dr Klaus Karl Schilling the bearded malaria scientist who worked with human guinea pigs at Dachau was in the group hanged Tuesday He worked through his last days compiling data of his experiments The prisoners sang songs in a group before the guards marched them from their cells Nation Faces Threat of pingKift er south on the Susquehanna and its tributaries prepared for floods In Sunbury and Harrisburg in Pennsylvania water already had crept into the streets Washington UR The govern ment came to grips Wednesday with the threat of a 3rd nation wide time by mari time workers Secretary of iabor Lewis B Schwellenbach called in union and management representatives for Joint conferences to prevent a walkout of 200000 seamen am longshoremen scheduled for June 15 They seek pay Increases up to 30 per cent A strike would af fect 3100 ships in every major port in the United Slates The walkout was voted by one independent and 6 CIO unions Strong communist elements an in some of the unions Among the organizations threat ening to strike are the Interna tional Longshoremen and Ware housemen CIO headed by Ham Bridges and the National Mari time union CIO headed by Jo seph Curran Bridges hand for and the Curran were conferences witl 2 North Iowa Youths Drown in Minnesota bodies of 2 young men of Manly who drowned in he lake at Albert Lea Minn vhen their canoe overturned vere brought to Brides funeral home here early Wednesday The victims are Dale John Sankes 16 son of Mr and Mrs L J Bankes and Carl Stcffeu cn 18 son of Mr and Mrs Harry Steffcnscn all of Manly The accident happened at Tuesday while the 2 young men vere riding in a canoe on the ake Darrell Bankes twin broth er of Dale went with them to the ake but he was asleep in the car at the time of the drowning Both Bankes and Steffensen vere good swimmers and it is believed one of the lads suffered in the cold water and the her may have attempted a is cue Only one witness a young man at Albert Lea could be found who saw the drowning and he could give few details A drag was used to recover he bodies which were found a short time after the accident Dale Bankes is survived by his parents 5 brothers and one sis ter all at home Steffensen who was recently discharged from the navy is sur vived by his parents and a sis ter Mrs Evalyn Rhoades of Al bert Lea Funeral arrangements had no been completed Wednesday morn ing but it was announced that Steffensen would be buried a Mechanicsville former home o the family Schwellenbach and shipping rep resentatives Schwellenbach warned that a shipping tieup coming after th railroad and coal strikes woulc seriously impair reconversior and distribution of food tor slarv ing peoples abroad Government officials however were cautiously hopeful that the strike would not materialize The labor department said 2400 of the ships which would be in volved are owned by the war shipping administration They are operated on the east coast by a committee of Atlantic Gulf Port shippers and on the west coast by the Water as sociation MISS RIDGEWAY NEW TREASURER Deputy for 19 Years Named by Supervisors Miss Ethel Hidgeway deputj county treasurer lor 19 years Wednesday was appointed treas urer to fill the vacancy caused by the death of L L Raymond i was announced by the board o supervisors Bliss Kidgeway will hold offici until the election of a surcesso next November according to stati law Election of a successor Involve nomination by convention of con didates for the office followinj the June 3 primary at which Ray mond was unopposed for the re publican nomination Nomination may be made by the republican not only for the 2 year term be ginning next January but also fo the uncompleted term of Raymon from election time in November to January Emery A VanEvery is unop posed in the democratic primarie for the 2 year term but the dem ocratic county convention can als nominate a candidate for the shor term Japs in nefl Cross Tokyo news agency reported Wednesday the Japanese Red Cross society would accept an invitation to send representa tives to the 17th international Red Cross conference at Geneva Switzerland in August Iowa Plans Solemn Memorial Day Tribute to War Dead by THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Iowa will pay solemn tribute Thursday to its dead and living veterans of all services and all wars in the first peacetime Mem orial day observance in 4 years Veterans of World war It many of them in uniform will join In paying homage to their departed comrades In arms as Iowa cities mark the annual holiday with parades cemetery ceremonies and other rites The toll oJ Iowas war dead in cludes more than 7600 ot its sons who fell in the conflict which ended last year Many of them still sleep in neatly kept military cemeteries across the seas where other Americans still under arms will honor them at ceremonies Thursday More than 275000 lowans served in World war Its armed forces The lowans who died in uni form also include 3578 of the 114 223 who served in the first World war 1301 who came to their deaths in the Civil war and a les ser number of SpanishAmerican war dead More than 55000 graves of Iowa both wartime dead and those who died after be decorated daring Thursdays observances in cities towns and hamlets In some Iowa cities formal volleys of tribute will be fired by nnlformed detach ments Memorial day speakers includ ing World war II chaplains and men who served in the line have almost uniformly taken as their theme for Thursdays addresses the plea that war must not come to the world again For many cities Thursdays parade will be the first since be fore the war Veterans organiza tions and units of the Iowa state guard patriotic societies will comprise the main contingent of most parades but many cities have asked returning veterans to don their uniforms and participate Iowa cities planning parades In clude Des Molnes Iowa City Du hnqiBe Davenport Sioux City Cedar Rapids Fort Dodge Mar shalltownClinton Council Bluffs Perry Cherokee Boone and Ma son City Special tribute will be paid the states sailor dead in Bridge Riv erside and Lakeside ceremonies in a number of localities including SSoux City Iowa City Des Moines Muscatine Perry Cedar Rapids Fort Dodge and Dubuque At Muscatine a float bearing floral tributes to the sailor dead will be launched in the Mississippi river from Riverside park In most cities floral wreaths will be placed on the water With most formal observances planned for sunrise during the morning and at sundown Mem orial day afternoon will be for many an occasion for family re unions picnics and holiday rec reation In a number places the day will mark the summer open ing of swimming pools In Des Moines the state AAU track and field meet will be held at Drake stadium beginning at 3 p m Dirt track auto races are scheduled at Davenport a n 6 Hawkeye Downs Cedar Rapids FRANCE OBTAINS LOAN FROM U S Washington turned with renewed vigor Wednesday to the job of getting back on her feet backed by aloan of from the United States The two countries made a num ber of agreements in connection with the credit arrangement whicli President Truman and French President Felix Gouin announced jointly Tuesday night French officials estimated the money would finance at least one year of their countrys 4year re habilitation plan In addition to United States things the credit the promises these 1 To help France sell her goods here This might mean an ultimate reduction in American tariffs on French goods 2 An additional per haps buy about 750000 tons of American shipping France in turn pledged itself not to raise its tariffs on Ameri can products and joined with the United States and Britain in their campaign to expand world trade through lowered tariffs every where Japs Steal Trousers Urawa Japan IP Disarma ment note Three Japanese bran dishing broadswords raided a former army clothing post drove guards with flourishes of their blades and fled with 120 pairs of trousers EWIS FINISHES MEETING WITH POLICY GROUP Senator Wheeler Says Peace Announcement Is Expected Soon Washington IP Senator Wheeler DMont said Wednes day settlement or the coal strika s expected Wednesday afternoon Wheeler who has been in close ouch with the eoal negotiations alkcd to reporters shortly after he United Mine Workers policy committee ended an unheralded hour meeting at union head quarters There was no announcement ot he policy committee action but ittle doubt it hod met to ratify a jroposed contract negotiated by JMW Chief John L Lewis and Secretary of Interior Krug In a floor speech asking sup ort oL the presidents emergency abor legislation Lucas said the Truman request for the legislation was responsible for settlement the rail strike and the coal strike Lucas spoke shortly after John Lewis conferred for 2 hours with his policy makers at union headquarters The United Mine Workers chief ain smiled broadly as he emerged the polfcy committee meet ing at UMW headquarters but parried reporters Queries about a settlement with a terse no com ment Shortly before the session the CJMWs district 6 headquarters in Columbus Ohio expressed belief the strike was over and that final details of an agreement with gov ernment negotiators would be whipped into shape at the policy session However to meet during the afternoon with Secretary of Interior Krug as federal mines boss has been conducting the negotiations with the UMW There was speculation that the conference between Krug and Lewis would be held at the white house and that President Truman would announce the strike settle ment Newsmen at UMW headquar ters noticed that a sign placed there a feiv days ago to announce deferment of any policy commit tee meeting had been removed The notice had said there would be no further meetings of the group until the status of the min ers under the SmithConnally la bor disputes act had been clari fied The SmithConnally act pro hibits any person from inciting a strike or conspiring to strike in a governmentoperated mine Secretary or Interior Krugs of fice advised reporters that Krug would meet with Lewis and other UMW officials sometime Wed nesday afternoon Krug is federal boss of the mines District 6 headquarters said in Columbus Ohio that we think the strike is over and that final details of the settlement would be worked out at a a m con ference in Washington The headquarters information was described as coming from T J Price district secretarytreas urer in Washington Krug reported some progress been made in drafting a new contract The strike is in its 59th day counting the only partially effec tive 2week truce which ended last Saturday The major terms on which Lewis and the government were said to be in agreement as of Tues day call for I A 45hour 5 day week to re place the present 8day work week with the basic wage rate boosted from an hour to S118V3 Time and onehalt would be paid for work beyond 35 hours each week This would net the miners S5925 for a 45hour week compared to their previous 50 for 54 hours Z Two health and welfare funds One would be financed by the operators at the rate of 5 cents a ton of coal produced and would be administered jointly The other would be made up of present pay roll deductions for such things as medicine surgery and hospitali zation in cases where such pay ments already are made This fund would be administered solely by the union 3 Following the procedures of the national labor relations board in determining by elections which supervisory workers are eligible for membership in Lewis union 4 Safety standards to be set up by the federal bureau of mines 5 Housing and sanitation facil ities to be surveyed by an out standing authority with the help of the public health service in an effort to establish standards for the company towns   

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