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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: May 18, 1946 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - May 18, 1946, Mason City, Iowa                                NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME SEP7 rut NT r H i Tift V Ij H v fcO I fill I THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS UI Associated Ptea and Units i FuU Leased Five Centj a Copyl MASON CITY IOWA SATURDAY MAY 18 1940 No 190 ODT EYES RAH STRIKE MEASURES Railroads Put Embargo on Perishable Goods Livestock TRUMAN HOPES TO GET RUSSIA HELP ON FOOD Stalin Rejects Appeal for Participation in World Famine Battle Washington can hopes of enlisting Russia in a united fight on world famine re ceived a fresh setback Saturday from the report that General issimo Stalin has turned down an appeal fromvPresident Truman for Soviet participation The TrumanStalin exchange was reported by a strategically Placed official who declined to be quoted by name but asserted the Russian reply contended pre vious Soviet relief commitments made the American request too late Mr Truman was not content with the reply according to un official reports and apparently still hopes to get Moscow to re consider its aloof attitude toward the world foodproblem However Soviet Commentator Peter Orlov declared in a Moscow radio broadcast Saturday Russia had pledged more than 1100OOC tons of wheat and corn to Fin land France Poland and Ro mania since the surrender of Germany Russias own food supplies are still limited Orlov said Also in Moscow Marshal Mac Dnffie chief of the UNRRA mis sion o the Ukraine said pro tracted drought threatened ihe grain crop there Unless rain came within 2 weeks he added the effect will be ruinous on thi growing cereals of Russias grea bread basket area Fresh stress meanwhile wa laid on the urgency of the relie situation A joint United StatesBritish communique issued here Friday night reported that a 3400000 ton grain deficit was now likely in the MaySeptember period effort to meet requirements of need nations Former President Hoover speaking in Chicago Friday night described the present picture as the grimmest sgectre of famine in all the history of the world He said it threatened 800000000 Back from his world survey of hungry nations Hoover in a radio address urged Americans to prac tice even greater food conserva tion arid appealed to fanners to market every grain of cereal on their farms Says XRays Can Identify Hitler Remains Los Angeles American medical intelligence officer Satur day produced Xrays of Adolf iitler which he said could identify he dictators remains The Xrays were taken by Ger man doctors who treated Hitlers diseased body The investigator Herman Merl said the reports and photographs were taken from 6 physicians who lad charge of Hitlers health They showed a normal brain with no delusions or obsessions he said but a body plagued by ailments The Xrays included careful ictures of Hitlers head Merl said le believed they could be used to determine whether the body the Russians now have is Hitlers or not Merl said that Hitler from his doctors point of view was a man of many ills whose most serious ailment was a heart disease That would have knocked htm off in a few years if the allies hadnt Merl said Hitlers temperament was so ex citable the doctors reports said that he suffered from constant stomach ache Once his ailing stomach aggravated by poor diet gave him abdominal cramps To ease the pain he took female sex hormones Then he started to worry about a shift in his masculinity Merl said So he dosed up on male hormones Extracts from young bulls to be exact Hitlers sex life was fairly nor mal his doctors believed He was very fond of the soci ety of attractive women particu larly during the years of his rise to power the said In later was sublimated with the increase in duties and responsibilities Hitler was not a hypochondriac and did not like to be babied Merl said But his chief physician for 8 years Dr Theo Morell won his confidence by close attention to his slightest ills combined report years his libido GRAIN FOR and com from the plains of the Argentine are stream ing into the port of Buenos Aires to be loaded on ships bound for faminestricken Europe Draft Boards Begin Culling Lists to Meet Service Needs CHARGE 10WAN WITH MURDER Clarinda Edward Gordon 25 was charged with first degree murder in an indictment returned Friday by a special Page county grand jury County At torney James Howard said Gordon is accused of attacking with an axe and knife his 22 yearold wife Mildred who diec at a Shenandoah hospital March 27 The alleged attack took place at Mrs Gordons parents home Shenandoah Howard previously quoted Gor don as saying that Mrs Gordon had married another serviceman without divorcing him Most of the citizens of Saskat chewan Canada have been set tled there since 1910 RECRUITING IN IOWA SLUMPS Not Expecting to Enlist Many 1819 Year Olds Des Jloines the high schools close Iowas district army recruiting headquarters here is not expecting to enlist many 18 or 19yearolds Col Ernest E McCIish com manding officer of the headquar ters said Friday that amendment of the selective service law so that teenagers could not be drafted had sharply reduced voluntary en listments in those age groups He said 12 youths sent from the recruiting station here to Fort Snelling Minn Monday for in duction changed their minds when congress amended the ct They hadnt been inducted yet so withdrew their enlistment appli cations Weather Report FORECAST Mason City Cloudy Saturday night and Sunday with showers Sunday No decided change in temperature Iowa Mostly cloudy Saturday night and Sunday Showers in west Saturday night and in south and east portions Sunday cooler in south portion Sunday Minnesota Mostly cloudy Satur day night and Sunday Light showers southwest portion Sat urday evening Slightly cooler south portion IN MASON CUT GlobeGazette weather statistics for 24 hour period ending at 8 oclock Saturday morning Name Farm Fieldman Des Moines of Arthur Gerlack Mitchell county farmer and purebred Hoi stein breeder as an Iowa produc tion and marketing administra tion fieldman has been announced by A J Loveland state PMA di rector Loveland said Gerlack who succeeds Otto Brandau would serve AAA committees in northeast Jowa Hershey Tells Boards to Give Exams to Men in Late 20 Age Bracket Washington Selective service boards began culling their ists of childless men 2G through 29 years old Saturday to meet the service manpower pinch resulting rom a congressional ban on eenage inductions Maj Gen Lewis B Hershey selective service director told Ihe boards to call up for prcin ducfion physical examinations men in the late20 bracket who may qualify for military service under existing physical and occupational standards He directed that men who have been discharged from the armed forces and any with manifest7 physical disabilities be exempted from the call The others may be classified 1A unless they can ob tain occupational deferment On capital hill Chairman Elberl Thomas D Utah the senate military committee planned to try for unanimous senate approval of a committee bill providing a 1 year draft extension with 18 and 19 year olds eligible increases in pay for enlisted men and discharge of fathers or men with 18 months or more service on request Maximum 50 Minimum 39 At 8 a m Saturday 47 Precipitation OS YEAR AGO Maximum 64 Minimum 35 Name Hickenlooper Washington Hick enlooper RIowa was appointee Friday to a fivemember commit tee which will investigate thi years senatorial campaign expen ditures NO PEACE HOPES IN COAL STRIKE Union and Management Reported Standing Pat Washington IP Charles G Ross presidential press secretary said he anticipated no white house levelopments Saturday in the deadlocked coal contract dispute There is nothing new in the sit uation Koss told reporters There was no hint of any new presiden ial move Sunday cither Ross an nounced IMr Trumans plans to fly o Missouri Sunday afternoon on an overnight trip There was no indication from the soft coal operators or John L Lewis and his United Mine Work ers of a weekend change in the picture With only a week remaining of the truce under which Lewis let UHnVs 400000 miners return to the pits last Monday fcoth union and management were standing pal Lewis backed by AFLs execu tive council in a resolution Friday pledging support of 7000000 fed eration members until victory is won showed no sign of weaken ing on his demand for a health and welfare levy at which the oper ators have balked ALL FREIGHT FAKEN SUBJECT TO RAIL DELAY Officials Plan to Keep North Iowa Mainlines Running in Some Manner An embargo on all perishable reight and livestock was clamped own Saturday and freight ship nents were accepted subject to clay only by all of Mason Citys railroads Every office in Mason City was sitting tight waiting for the 4 m walkout hour when the na ionwide railroad strike was ex eeled to go into effect As nearly as could be forecast vithout definite statements from he 4 railroad unions a strike vould tie up switching and trains n Mason City but the mainlines vould be kept running in some manner One railroad official said that f the brakemen and engineers walked out with every indica ion that they will the trains vould have to be operated by superintendents train masters and others authorized to operate trains This would of course cause de ays The conductors and firemen iVere expected to remain on duty but this again was unofficial If the strike goes into effect at least one train the southbound North Western will be tied up in Mason City Saturday night and possibly others waiting govern ment orders to go ahead No embargo has been placed on shipments by trucklines however and the Mason City Warehouse corporation reported all truck lines are operating into and out of Mason City on schedule and that all attempts would he made to handle shipments via these lines without delay Although it was still early Sat urday to determine whether in creased passenger traffic would be found on the Jefferson Transpor tation company buses and the Winnebago Lines both lines ex pected the traffic to increase in the event of the rail strike MidContinent Airlines also were receiving inquiries as to passenger service by air in the RAILROAD NEWS Trainman William W Lanzarone right of Hillis Long Island N Y shows Engineer L R Reed of Wilmington Del a notice that President Truman had seized the nations railroads and appealed to engineers and trainmen to disregard the strike call AP Wirephoto May Get Television Washington is one of 27 cities where permits for 46 new commercial television stations might be issued without a hearing the communications commission said FridayApplicants were not listed by the commission which said sufficient channels were available in these cities for all pending applications event a tieup of trains should take place on the railroads Bus lines and airlines are operating on schedule as usual Throughout Iowa trainmen and locomotive engineers were sched uled to go on strike at 4 p m Saturday unless they receive dif ferent orders from their superior officers Despite President Trumans or der putting the railroads under federal government control it was indicated trains in the state would be stopped at the nearest division point when the strike deadline arrived Expressing hope that the dis pute would not end in a strike Saturday Lloyd E Durbin West DCS Moines division Hock Island chairman of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers asserted that unless we receive notice from our superior officers the order for he strike will have to stand Troop and hospital trains will be handled by union members Durbin said The Hock Island was not ac cepting any livestock shipments which would not arrive at their destination by noon Saturday and B R Dew Rock Island superin tendent in Des Moines said other freight shipments were being ac cepted subject to delay belt and feeder exempted from lines have been the strike The Outlook in Rail Strike Cleveland is the outlook in event a strike by members of the Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen and the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers materializes at 4 p m Saturday Industry emerging from the effects of a crippling coal strike would face shutdowns within a week Food shortages would develop rapidly with perishables disap pearing from store shelves in ar matter of hours Travelers would be stranded away from homes Busses could handle only a fraction of train passengers Trucks could handle only a small percentage of freight The nations mail service would be disrupted The strike was called for 4 p m StandardTime in each affected area Thus a strike will require an overall time of 3 hours to be come effective over the nation Not affected in thestrike call are troop hospital and milk trains Brotherhood officials have instructed their members that so CONSIDERUS1NG ARMY NAVY TO FLY ALL MAIL Would Permit NonRail Carrier Systems to Haul Freight and Passengers Washington office of defense transportation considered Saturday a proposal to have mili tary plaries fly the mail and non rail transportation systems handle their capacity of freight and pas senger traffic if a strike paralyzes the railroads Consultations were hastily called early Saturday afternoon with postal officials and officers from the war and navy department as 4 p m hour for the scheduled walkout of 230000 engineers and trainmen ncarcd An ODT official said no decision was reached immediately but that it was possible that all first class Cancel Trains New York The New York Central railroad announced Saturday afternoon it had can celled the Ohio State Limited scheduled to leaxc Grand Cen tral terminal at 3 p m CST for Cincinnati and the Pace maker due to depart at p m CST for Chicago mail might go by army and navy planes The airlines water carriers truck and bus systems were asked to assume if necessary what share they could of hauling the nations freight and passengers A union statement that the railroad strike is an dampened alreadyfaint hopes that the rail transportation system of the country might be spared an im mediate crippling Second Assistant Postmaster General Gael Sullivan said Sat urday that a limited embargo on the mails might have to be de clared Sullivan made the statement in telling reporters shortly after noon CST that he had tele phoned Presidents A F Whitney of the Brotherhood of Trainmen Illinois Central went under gov ernment supervision months ago J A Krug secretary of the in terior is the tallest man in Pres ident Trumans cabinet He towers six feet four inches and weighs more than 250 pounds far as their legal right to strike is concerned there is no differ ence between a mail train and any other train Other brotherhood instructions No man in road service in volved in the strike will perform any service after the hour set to strike unless he already has be gun a trip and actually has left the terminal If the train has left the termi nal he will complete the trip and deliver the engine and train at the end of the run or tieup poinl x x x Men in other than road service will leave the service at the appointed time The strike call originally was issued against 348 railroads and terminals in the United States The Illinois Central and 27 small lowan Dies When Truck Hits Train Fairmont Minn L Schmall 22 Ledyard Iowa was killed Saturday when his lum ber truck crashed into a fog EhroiKled Chicago North Western freight train standing on a Min nesota highway crossing on the east city limits of Fairmont The train had stopped to set out cars Clinton to Change to Daylight Saving Time Clinton clocks will be turned ahead to daylight saving time at 2 a m Sunday June 2 according to a resolution adopted Friday night by the city council High frequency sound equip ment has now been developed to detect flaws in thick sheets of metal Heres ABC of Railroad Strike as 2 Out of 20 Unions Schedule Walkout By JAMES MARLOW Associated Press Staff Writer Washington F Heres the ABC of the railroad strike due to start at 4 p m Saturday Only 2 of the 29 hi railroad unions called the strike Those are the engineers and trainmen about 250000 of them A strike by them would be enough to tie up the railroads theyre key men The other un ions could hardly operate the roads without them But although the strike was called by only 2 of the 20 unions i all 20 wanted the same things I They wanted higher pay and I some changes in their contracts with the railroads All of them put I in their de mands almost a year ago They argued with the railroad com panies for months Then when no settlement was reached the dispute went before a number of government boards All this has taken time plenty of time and is just coming to a head now and for this reason The government boards decided the unions were entitled to about only half the wage increase they wanted Also the boards decided the demands for would need a straighten out contract changes lot more time to Not all the unions asked for pre cisely the same things Mar did all go through precisely the same procedure Heres an explanation The 20 unions are divided up this way 1 There are 5 very big unions the Big Five Brotherhoods which operate the trains Theyre called the operating unions The 5 unions are Engineers trainmen conduc tors switctaien enginemen 2 There are 15 other unions of railroad workers They dont run the trains So theyre called the nonoperating unions The Big Five asked for a wage boost of at least S250 a day For slightly more than 31 cents an hour The 15 nonoperating unions asked for an increase of 30 cents an hour For an 8hour day this would be a raise of a day But this is the answer they got from the government boards The government has a wage price policy to keep wages and prices in line Living costs have gone up 33 per cent since January 1941 So under the wageprice policy any one who has not received a 33 per cent wage increase since Jan uary 1941 is entitled to that much i an 8bour day that would be i Railroad workers during the j ed to strike war received wage increases to taling 15 per cent Therefore to brins them up o the 33 per cent allowable increase they now should get an increase of only 18 per cent more An increase of 18 per cent would be 16 cents an hour or for an 8hour day Thats what the various government boards said the railroad workers should get So this would be an increase of a day instead of the asked by the Big Five and the S240 asked by the nonoperating Unions The engineers and trainmen re fused to accept this raise and vot The other 15 oper ating brotherhoods of conductors switchmen and enginemen and the 15 nonoperating decided to argue with the rail roads for the rest of the raise they wanted But the 15 nonoperating broth erhoods are getting tired of the arguments and the other day de cided to take a vote among their members on whether they woulc strike The remaining big brotherhood switchmen and en getting restless too Theyve announced that unles they get action on their demand and Alvanley Johnston of the en gineers at Cleveland to ask spe cifically whether mail would be included in emergency services if workers walked off the job They promised me an answer within an hour said Sullivan who acted in the matter for the postmaster general If the an swer is negative we are prepares to use commercial planes and other equipment up to the hilt but a limited embargo on mail may have to be declared Director J Monroe Johnson oE ODT conferred with representa tives of nonrail groups includ ing the armed forces but the brief announcement on the meet ing carried no hint of the plans decided if any The ODT director also tele graphed the 18 railroad brother hoods who are not going along m scheduled strike He asked hem to continue manning the 337 seized by the government At the white house where President Truman Friday took over the railroads in an effort to stop the strike there was no word to how the government ex pected to keep the trains running Director J Monroe Johnson of he office of defense transporta ion told reporters Friday that he would continue to operate the trains in event of a walkout but was not clear how this could be doneCharles H Euford federal manager of the governmentoper ated lines said he did not contem plate using the military for this purpose Contrary to the belief in some quarters that persons in transit by 4 oclock would be delivered to their destination there ap peared a possibility that some of the the general pub be stranded between points when trains stopped run ning The trainmen themselves kept the situation in suspense with conflicting indications on their course Some subordinate union leaders and ordinary members in timated they were sitting tight pending further word from their national headquarters Others said the decision is up to the individ uals Still others anticipated no change in strike plans D D Robertson president of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen said 25 000 members of his union planned 1 soon theyll also take a strike vote to stay on the job on 169 railroads   

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