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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: April 2, 1946 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - April 2, 1946, Mason City, Iowa                                NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH 10WANS NEIGHBORS VOL LU AaoctMtd Pica and UaMrf Pnas rull Leased Wires Five Cents a Copy MASON CITY IOWA TUESDAY APRIL 2 191G Waves Almost Caught Hilos Business Rush By DOUGLAS LOVELACE Associated Press Correspondent Hilo Hawaii seismic wave death toll might have been in the thousands had it struck 2 or 3 hours later than it did The swells engulfed Hilos waterfront business district while the city slowly was waiting to life Monday A little later employes aud shoppers would have thronged warehouses and stores in the ravished area The warning given by the 2 smaller of Hilos 3 waves saved hundreds who had time to flee from the waterfront This is how the waves struck The first Inundated 50 feet along the of it park and warehouse areas Cries of warning sounded and people raced into the streets in a mad rush for higher ground A few merchants remained to tidy their stores which were barely touched by the water Ten minutes laier a second larger wave struck driving 100 yards deeper Into the city smashing frailer buildings and strewing mud coral and debris through stores Volunteers poured into the area routing laggards A few minutes later the third wave towering angry 20foot wall of water rushing in from the north at incredible speed It smashed buildings to smithereens as it coiled and whiplashed 2 blocks deep into the city in a wave of destruction William Haua who rescued his mother and 2 other women from the Hana hotel described the fury We heard the water crash into buildings Screams of people the crunching of wood and the shattering of glass filled the air Onr hotel was shaking so fiercely we couldnt move There were about 25 women and children inside Then the waters receded and men started helping the women and children out Everyone hi the hotel was saved but we found 2 children Tuesday tearful grimfaced families wandered about this once beautiful city of 25000 searching for their missing Kamahameha a street of warehouses cheap frame hotels and little shops was reduced to a tangled muddied jumbled mass of wreckage Entire buildings were missing the fate of their occupants unknown Streets were blocked by rubble that once was buildings Power lines were down Railroad narrow gauge tracks were twisted like confetti A huge steel bridge was washed out Scores of small craft i1 were shattered Out in the harbor the ocean was pouring through the break water that cost several million dollars to build From the air the waterfront looked as if the ocean had picked up buildings swept them out to sea then dashed them back on land again like thousands of matches This Paper Consists of Two Ono NO 150 ft P If fa TIDAL WAVES HIT ALASKA Report Over 300 Dead in Pacific Disaster Security Council Delegates Expect Soviet Retaliation New York nations security council members braced themselves Tuesday for possible soviet retaliation against the United States and Great prosecutors of Irans case against Eussia At 10 a m CST only 24 hours remained before ihc next council meeting The opening of that meeting Wednesday is the deadline for both Iran and Russia to reply to the councils request for clarification of their dispute Secretary of State James F Byrnes will return to New York late Tuesday to resume direction of the U S delegation in the Iranian case He is ready to press council consideration of Irans charges in detail if the Russians do not ply or get out of Iran There are a number of other difficult political issues the soviet union could bring before the it did in it wishes Some diplomats connected with the council would be surprised if the soviet union accepts the UNO formula set up for disposal of the Iranian case without coupling its reply with charges against Britain and possibly the United States which might overshadow the Iranian issue In London when the Iranians brought their first case against Russia to the council the soviet union and soviet Ukraine snapped back immediately with charges against British policy in Indonesia and Greece The Russians still think that the British urged the Iranians to make those original charges and are extremely bitter about the leading role Byrnes has played in the Iranian case here TJispatches from Shannon Ire land reporting 2 heavilyladen Russian couriers en route from Moscow to Washington with im portant dispatches aroused coun cil memberscuriosity as they awaited Russias reply to the coun cils request for 1 Explanation of the exact status of sovietIranian negotia tions 2 Assurances that removal of Russian troops is not conditioned upon other Iranian concessions In oil etc Iranian Ambassador Hussein Ala denounced by the Russians for allegedly not following his governments instructions re ceived 100 per cent support from his premier Ahmad Ghavam ex sultaneh Monday In a cable to lie Ghavam indicated Iran is not backing down an inch in its case against Russia and officially assured lie that Ala has his full farmer to Trade DSC for Priority Beliirigham Wash William McLaughliu ran this ad Will trade distinguished service ross I won in World war I for pri ority on tractor The exmachine gunner of the irst World war said he had saved or 5 years to buy a tractor but couldnt buy one now because pri ority regulations favored veterans of World war II His decoration was for wiping out a German ma hinegun nest singlehanded AMBASSADOR IS DUE ARGENTINA Washington bitter tension in U SArgentine rela tions was eased somewhat Tues day by the announcement that a new American ambassador woulc be named this week to fill the vacant Buenos Aires post State department officials were qnick to deny that the surprise decision marked a reversal of Tl S policy loward Argentina fan1 most observers hclicved it was the first step in a move to patch np the No 1 lilt In the western hemisphere The announcement was au thorfzed by Secretary of Stati James F Byrnes following series of weekend conferences with Assistant Secretary SpnUUe Braden who withdrawn as ambassador to Argentina last Sep tember Informed sources speculated that the Buenos Aires assignment might go to William D Pawley now ambassador to Peru REPORT HOMMA but reliable sources reported in Manila that Gen MasuharaHomma was executed by a firing squad between mid night and 1 a m Tuesday Hom ma was the Japanese command er who ordered the notorious Bataan death march and the conqueror of Bataan and Cor rcgidor He was convicted as a war criminal on Feb 11 after be ing tried STASSEN PUTS SOUR NOTE IN REECE ELECTION Former Governor Does Not Approve of Reeces Stand on Past Issues Washington ff Harold E Stassen sounded a discordant note Tuesday in republican praises for the GOP national committees choice of Rep Carroll Reece of Tennessee as the partys new chairman Sfassen who is almost avowedly i the race for the 1948 presiden al nomination declared it is well known that I do not ap irove of Chairman Reeces stand n many issues in the past The former Minnesota gover nors statement left little doubt bout his disappointment over the committees ac tion in naming Reece a close political associ a t e of Senator Robert Taft and former Gov John W Bricker of Ohio over 2 other Candida tes Reece succeeds Herbert E Brownell J r who resigned STASSEN to devote full line to his New YorV law practice With the almost solid backing of southern state republicans plus some such veterans of GOP po itical battles as Werner Schroeder of Illinois Reece won on the 3rc Ballot In a torrid committee ses ion The 56 year old Tennesseean a veteran of nearly 25 years of con gressional service told delegates at a victory dinner Monday nigh he realizes the national chairman cannot make the republican party or determine its destinies That was the same point made by Stassen who said he did no believe Reeces selection consti tutes a declaration by the republi can party as to its policy or plat form Stassen said significantly he was prepared to cooperate with Reece in this years congressiona elections He did not go furthe than that Of course Stassen said i is well known that I do not ap prove of Chairman Reeces stani on many issues in the past The former Minnesota governo declined to amplify his remarks but it was apparent he consider Reeces congressional record on international issues open to ques tion Reeces forces headed by Wai ter Hallanan West Virginia com mitteeman defeated former Sena tor John A Danaher of Connecti cut generally regarded as th choice of Gov Thomas E Dewe of New York tanaher and John W Hanes North Carolina democratturned republican at one point on th 2nd ballot polled between them a total of 53 votes enough fo election had it been amassed b 1 individual Idaho Politician Dies Boise Idaho Be Ross 69 who fulfilled a boyhoo ambition by serving as governo of his native Idaho died Sunda of a heart ailment Ross was th states only 3 term governor H was chief executive from 1930 1936 y CLEANUP AFTER TIDAL road scraper removes debris from the main street m B Granada Gal Monday after tidal waves swept in from the Pacific battering seaside buildings and washing boats inland AP Big Waves Roll From Aleutians to Chile By UNITED PRESS Tidal waves hammered the Alaskan coast Tuesday weeping down on the Dutch Harbor naval base in the second ay of oceanic turmoil which devastated some areas of Hawaii where 800 persons were reported dead or missing At San Francisco the coast guard reported that heavy it called tidal running along he coast line at 5 minute intervals in the San Francisco rea The coast guard said the waves were 4 to 5 feet high nd began hitting the coast in the Point Arena area every 3 or 4 linutes starting at 8tl5 a m PST Earth tremors shook the Aleutian chain early Tuesday Navy fficials described it as a 2minule ouake ol low intensity Four hours later about a m Dutch Harbor time Dutch naval officials said a tidal wave hit the naval base there snapping a ferry cable but caus ing no other damage or casualties The original surge of water churned up by submarine earth quakes smashed against the coasts of North and South America the Hawaiian and other tiny Pacific Ribbentrop Lashed Benito on Jew Mercy Nuernberg Von iibbentrop angrily admitted be ore the international military tri junal Tuesday that he had up braided Benito Mussolini because of Italian mercy to Jews in south ern occupied France Earlier he testified that his Ger dian foreign office always sought to soften nazi antiSemitic niei sures in Europe Confronted with captured Ger man records which depicted him in the role of a special antiSemi tic envoy to foreign governments the former German foreign min ister conceded that the documents were substantially correct I knew of the fuehrers plan to resettle European Jews in east territories or later in Madagascar or North Africa Von Ribben trop said Because a largescale espion age system was discovered among Jews in France who helped Brit ish and American intelligence the fuehrer asked me to get Musso linis assurance that the Jews would be stopped The Italians had been working against certain measures taken against Jews by the French government under German influence A lot of un pleasant matters had occurred 5 INJURED IN TRAIN MISHAP Manning persons re ceived hospital treatment and many more were shaken up Tues day when 6 cars of a westbound Chicago Great Western passenger train were derailed 2 miles north east of here at a m A passenger coach was left on its side and a mail car was hang ing from a small bridge F Menzer Manning railroac agent said the injured were taken to Carroll and Manning hospitals The injured were in the coach Most seriously injured appeared to be Mrs Fred R Russell 62 Placerville Cal who sustained a possible back fracture Gran Quivira national monu ment in New Mexico contains the ruins of 2 missions built in 1629 160 Miners Walk Out on Themselves Glenridge 111 dred and 60 miners found them selves on strike Tuesday against a coal mine they own them selves So they went fishing idled in the sun and sent a request to Washington headquarters of the united mine workers AFL for permission to go back to work in their own mine For most of the 300 residents of this village the Marion County Coal Mine Inc is the only source of employment They own it themselves having bought it in 1940 for raised by sub scription Stockholders of the old Marion County Mining Co had shut down the pit for lack of profits The principal stockholder was i Mrs E E Pike of nearby Ccn tralia of the mines presi dent She wanted the miners to have it and offered it not to the highest bidder but to the miners for Bert Jolliff mine superintend ent said the miners did not ob ject to going on strike with the rest of the nations 400000 soft coal miners but he said they were anxious to get back to work to develop new diggings The miners dont object to not working now J a 11 i ff said T h e yr c enjoying themselves They dont object to the disputed isstrcs in the national strike either but they just want to get hack and develop that new terri tory Jolliff said he expected per mission to be granted within 2 weeks Meanwhile the workers will stay home he said Application for the permit made to the district UMW office at DuQuoin where it will be for warded to Washington Jolliff ex plained that permission would im Ply agreement to pay present un ion wage scales and make an pay raise to come ou additional of tho strike apply to the tim worked during the national dis pute Stock in the old mine was sole at a share with a limit of shares to each employ Today 52 workers own stock In 1945 th company distributed a dividends the superintenden said The mine that once was closet for lack of profits last year pro duced 130Q tons of coal a day Jolliff said the same amount WE expeclccl this year WHERE TIDAL WAVES from maltese cross indicated direction of tidal waves which took a toll of 10 men at Scotch Cap lighthouse A and broke with shattering force on the Hawaiian islands C Monday Center of the waves was believed to be at latitude 55 north longitude 164 west maltese according to the U S navy AP No Quick Settlement Seen in Transit and Coal Mine Strikes Lewis and Operators Resume Negotiations After Parley Failure By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS No quick settlement of the coun trys 3 newest major labor dis putes was indicated Tuesday as xansit strikes in Detroit and Ak ron Ohio continued to cripple public transportation and a work stoppage in the soft coal mines kept idle some 400000workers Bituminous operators and John L Lewis AFI United Mine Work ers planned to resume contract ne gotiations in Washington although spokesmen for both sides ex pressed beliefs no progress was made in Fridays conference The stoppage became effective at A M Monday and imme diately its effects were felt in the steel industry A prolonged shut down of the mines was expected to seriously curtail production in steel and other industries Paul Fuller special federal me diator attended Mondays session between miner and operator rep resentatives Charles ONeill op erators spokesman said there was no progress of any kind We are exactly where we have for weeks Union President Lewis the company said the operators demand must be submitted to ar bitration A union spokesman sai If the DSR would negotiate i good faith we could sit down settle this dispute within a day o less The transit tieups in both De troit and Akron inconvenience hundreds of thousands with sev era industrial plants reporting in creased absenteeism In Akron the striking CIO trans port workers voted against ar bitration of their wage dispul with the Akron transportatio company withdrew a compromis wage offer of 16 cents an hour in crease and returned to its origina demand of 32 cents an hour boos The company had offered a hourly hike of 6 cents They re ceived 98 cents an hour before th walkout Monday morning John Walsh of Cleveland wa named federal mediator to assi in negotiations as workers in th city of 300000 continued to shar rides and hitch hike to their job Waves Greater Than Expected in Atom Test Washington giant ti al waves now lashing the Pacific re far more violent than even the listurbances expected to be cre itecl by the atom bomb tests Navy seismologists said the atominduced seismic wave would not he more than a few feet high and probably would not be no iced outside the Marshall Archi lelago The tidal wave which boiled up rom the floor of the Pacific ocean and rushing toward Kodiak sland off Alaska was reported to je 100 feet in height Cmdr Roger Revelle atom bomb expert said the bomb was expected to start a submarine landslide on the outside rim of Bikini atoll This would pauses water to rush in from all sides creating a very Jong or seismic wave The wave would be similar to one formed when you drop a pebble in the water he said It would be comparatively high in the center but would decrease rap idly in height the farther away from the point of the explosion islands Monday At least 140 persons were 3 Wandering Cows Cause Collision Ritzvillc Wash IP Three cows decided to cross a highway State Patrolman Roy Betlatch re ported these developments A driver swerving to miss the cows hit a calf and his woman companion nnd the calf went into a ditch full of water Another car lanced off a parked truck and struck the leg of a navy lieutenant who had stopped to help The box score Three damaged cars One wet woman One drowned calf One compound leg fracture One neg ligent driving charge Three un scathed cows Weather Report FORECAST Mason City FairTuesday night and Wednesday cooler Tuesday night Iowa Generally fair Tuesday night and Wednesday Cooler Tuesday night and in south and east portions Wednesday Minnesota Partly cloudy Tuesday night and Wednesday Cooler Tuesday night and in southwest portion Wednesday IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics for 24 hour period ending at 8 oclock Tuesday morning Maximum 74 Minimum 42 At 8 a m Tuesday 55 YEAR AGO Maximum 70 Minimum 3J Strikes At a Glance becn By UNITED PRESS com Almost 700000 workers were idle in the U S Tuesday in strikes mented that We found the erators in their usual mood clining to do anything I AUTOMOTIVE tOoOOO workers returned al various General Buses and street cars in Detroit PIants as local issues were being settled An estimated 70000 remained idle for the 2nd day as a stalemate developed in the wage dispute between the AFX Amalga mated Association of Street Elec tric railway and Motor Coach Em ployes of America and the Detroit department of street railways The union which called the strike of 5200 bus and trolley op erators in support of demands for an 18cent hourly wage increase was told by Mayor Edward J Jeffries no negotiations would be held while the workers remained away from their jobs Jeffries and still out coa miners remained idle as negotiations were to be resumed at Washington Tuesday ELECTRICALA meeting between presidents of the CIO and the the islands and h as a known dead and the damage was expected to run into many mil lions of dollars A Hawaiian said at least 300 persons were dead or missing A navy pilot riding high over he Bering sea radioed that he sighted a huge wave travelling about 35 miles an hour near the air base at Naknek Alaska He said it seemed to be heading for the rugged Kvichak coast on the north side of Alaska threatening dozens of little communities The University of Washington seismograph Seattle recorded 4 earth tremors of sharp but sec N lowan in Hilo Clear Fred Hart man former Swaledale resident and daughter of Mr and Mrs G IV Urbatch of Clear Lake is a teacher in the high school at Hilo Hawaii hardest hit by the tidal waves Monday Mrs Hart man visited her parents in Clear Lake last summer pndary intensity in the Aleutian islands Tuesday Across the na tion Fordham university reported 2 major shocks but said they were less violent than Mondays and that the quake was practically tapered out I lied Cross officials said they ivere caring for 2000 tidal wave victims including injured and homeless in Hawaii Emergency food and shelter were provided for 1000 and 30 tons of food were sent to shaken Maul island The tidal waves extended 7000 miles up and down the Pacific from the Aleutians to the western coast of South America Dis patches from Chile said that high waves crushed small boats and destroyed coastal installations Residents were told to flee to higher ground Seismologists reported that a total of 8 earthquakes were re corded during the rush of the lidal waves The last tremor was recorded at Fordham university in New York shortly after 1 a m EST Tuesday Scouting planes from Kodiak and bases in the Hawaiian cliain ranged far out at sea fo check pro gress of the new tidal waves which started Monday in the wake of a submarine earthquake in the vicinity of Unimak island The tidal waves moved over a 4000 mile arc and caused death and destruction in the Aleutians the Hawaiisns and along the west ern coast of the United States The toll was extremely heavy on the island of Hawaii An estimat ed 10000 persons were made homeless as their beachfront dwellings were smashed by the onrushing water The mayor of Hilo capital of the island of Hawaii reported in a broadcast picked up by the navy in Honolulu that 300 persons were killed or trussing Navy dispatches received at Honolulu said the great waves hit Midway and the Johnston islands damage to com munication facilities hut there was no loss of life The navy said new equipment was being sent to Midway and Johnston At least I4fl persons were known to be dead or missing In the 3 areas swept Monday by tidal waves There were 79 known dead Westinghouse Electric corporation failed to produce agreement that would have ended the 78day strike of 75000 electrical workers FAR5I Federal conciliators reported progress in settling the 72day old strike of 30000 CIO Farm Equipment workers in 10 International Harvester Co plants 2000000 residents of Akron Ohio and Detroit con tinued to rely on private transportation as 5500 transit workers in the 2 cities remained on strike after negotiations broke down MEAT The CIO Packinghouse Workers union threatened to re new their strike because of layoffs allegedly resulting from packers refusal to buy livpstork at present prices missing 10 dead in the Aleutians and one off the California coast which also was battered by heavy seas The known dead or missing in cluded 72 at Hilo 10 at Laupa hochoe 30 miles north of Hilo 7 on Oahu 15 at Kaual 26 on Maul island 10 on Inimak island in the Aleutians and 1 at Santa Cruz Cat f   

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