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Mason City Globe Gazette: Friday, March 1, 1946 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - March 1, 1946, Mason City, Iowa                                NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS m Assodated Press imd Onlttd Press Pull Leased Wlro Cents a Copyl MASON CITV IOWA FRIDAY MARCH 1 1916 TWa Pa MASON CITYCHICAGO AIRLINE NEAR Russians to Quit Sections of Iran SOVIET TROOPS TO LEAVE ONLY CALMER PARTS Broadcast From Moscow 1st Definite Indication of Decision by Russia London Moscow ra dio announced Friday that red army troops would start with drawing Saturday from these sec tions of Iran which are undis turbed but would remain in the northwestern area which includes the province of Azerbaijan The soviet govemment has in formed Iranian negotiators that the Saturday from all Iran under an allied be limited fo eastern areas of soviet occupation in northern Iran where the situ ation is relatively calmer ac cording to the broadcast An autonomous government was reported a month ago to have been set up in Azerbaijan prov ince after red army troops blocked off Iranian reinforcements or dered into the province to put down a revolt Premier Ahmed Qavam Saltaneh announced Feb 8 before he left for Moscow to negotiate RussianIranian differ ences that he would not recog nize the Azerbaijan regime The broadcast was the first def inite indication from the soviet capital what the Russians in tended to do about the withdrawal of foreign troops set for March 2 under the BritishHussianIran ian treaty of 1942 It followed a statement at the foreign office here Friday that all British troops would r have been withdrawn by Saturday in strict accord with the treaty The last of the United States forces assigned to Iran were withdrawn Jan 1 A British foreign office spokes man said there probably had been exchanges of information between London and Washington regarding the withdrawal as the deadline neared The United States embassy said it had no information on any negotiations and up to the time of the Moscow broadcast had no indication of what the Russians would do about withdrawing The Moscow broadcast said Ahmed Qavam was notified of Russias intentions to commence partial withdrawal from the re gions which are more or less quiet especially from the regions of Mezhed Shahrud and Samnan in the eastern part of Iran In regard to the soviet troops in the other parts of Iran it said they will remain in Iran untli the clearance the situa tion Backward N Gets Attention by Drivers Seattle Sign Painter George Hoeh always paints the first N backwards in his no parking psychological effect he explains Signsaturated motorists who get into the habit of ignoring the painted notices are snapped to attention by the wrongway N Hoeh claims He says he makes the 2nd N in the standard fash ion so that people will know I know better Blacksmith Dies Cherokee H Eilers 66 Cherokee blacksmith died Thursday from injuries received Feb 21 when he slipped and fell after alighting from a bus He suf fered a fractured skull lrPOCKETS THANKS FOR ITfOK I CAN PAYMYHEMS PAPBR8O VMAD VANCE TOMORROW Yonr Carrier cannot afford to credit anyone for more than one week PRESIDENT TRUMAN CONFERS WITH Truman left confers Friday with former President Herbert Hoover in the White House office on the prob lem of feeding overseas needy Hoover directed aid to Europe after World War I fAP x Wirephoto S former war time food administrators and 11 other wellknown citizens came together in the capital Friday to help President Truman deal with the problem of relieving starva tion abroad Former President Herbert Hoov er World war I food administra tor and Chester C Davis who held a similarpost for a time in World war n were among those called to the white honse confer ence The president sought the groups advice on a program of selfdenial by Americans so that food may go to warravaged European and Asiatic areas threatened by fam ine The eatless campaign will be carried on through the press ra dio speaking platform and in civic half 1946 Anderson saidFebru groups ary exports were about 150000 Mr Hoover said on his arrival here Thursday night the main ary exports tons short NEGOTIATION IN 101 DAY OLD GM WALKOUT FAILS Conference on Long and Costly Dispute Adjourned to Saturday Detroit Negotiations in the General Motors strike failed to achieve a settlement on the 101st day of the costly walkout Friday As corporation and union nego tiators left a session with Federal Mediator James F Dewey Waller P Keuther of Ihe striking CIO United Auto Workers was asked if they reached an agreement j We did not Rcuthcr replied firmly Fridays brief negotiating ses sion was adjourned until 10 a m Saturday When GUI and the UAW reach a settlement the pact will be re ferred immediately to a national conference of officials represent ing the 175000 strikers at GM local unions for approval The national conference was ordered last Monday to convene at 1 p m Friday for a 2 day meeting The call was issued by Union President R J Thomas Walter P Reulher vice president in charge of the GM division George S Addes secretary treas while house conference ther members of the touv n f ltntf nrvrviw nn problem is to feed starving Eurounderway as other parls of Mr 1 toP negotiating commit peans until June After the next Trumans fnnrt rniiQnrvatinn nmi lhe agreement if a lee peans until June After the next harvest they will be out of the woods he predicted In the meanwhile Secretary of Agriculture Anderson taking an other approach to the problem sought movement of wheat from midwesferii clevi lors and farms to seaports for ex port Anderson told reporters that unless something is done very soon about the transportation sit uation this country may fall near ly 40 per cent short of its wheat export goals during March The goal is 1000000 tons of wheat monthly during the first Trumans food conservation proi gram went into effect Beginning Friday millers start extracting 12 per cent more flour from each bushel ot wheat The result will be a somewhat darker shade ot flour althoughdkwiUibe dTew weeks before consumers generally notice a slight difference in the color of bread Also beginning Friday brewers stopped using wheat or any wheat product in making mall bever ages including beer The same or der also restricts the total use of other grains to 70 per cent of the amount used by the brewing in dustry last year See United States Protest to Russia on Iran Situation By JOHN M HIGHTOWER Washington United States government is expected by diplomatic officials here to protest to Russia against the newly an nounced plan of keeping red army forces in socalled disturbed areas of Iran These diplomats who refused direct quotation said it was pcr feeHy reasonable to expect the American government to object strongly to the Russian policy Two reasons for such action were cited One is that all Russian troops were supposed to get out of Iran by Saturday at the latest other is that Secretary of State Byrnes in his New York speech Thursday night laid heavy em phasis on the need for all countries to get their a r rn i e s home again and stop using force or threats of force for politi cal advantage The TJ n i t ed States is con cerned not only about Russian forces in Iran but also about those in Man BYENES the way meetings again for more Big 3 if President Truman Premier Stalin or Prime Minister Attlee think they would do any good churia and Austria Quiet efforts have been underway for some time to get soviet agreement to a joint allied withdrawal from Austria Byrnes New York address gen erally interpreled here as indi cating a tougher attitude toward Russia all along the line also opened the way for direct ana vigorous measures to try lo keep the Russians from stripping prop erty from liberated and former enemy satellite countries Meanwhile there Is growing con cern among many officials as to soviet intentions in Manchuria in view of recent reports that red army forces there show signs of staying on indefinitely The main points of the speech which diplomatic officials stressed as of great importance in the de velopment of a more vigorous American leadership in world af fairs were these 1 The United States intends to live up fully to the principles of the united nations charter and to use all its influence to see that other nations do the same 2 To that end the United States must be mightily armed until such time as reduction of arma ments among all the powerful na tions becomes possible By dis arming alone Byrnes said the United States would weaken its position and upset the power balI Welkins ance of the world thus en dangering peace 3 The United States believes that no nation has a right to keep its troops in an independent country unless that country wants them there It also believes that troops should be withdrawn as quickly as possible from small and impoverished states pre sumably meaning the exenemy satellite countries of eastern Eu rope 4 There is no danger of war as long as each nation lives up to the obligations of the united na tions charter not to employ forces except to prevent aggression When any other country does use force or the threat of force in vio lation of the charter we cannot stand aloof Byrnes said 5 The big powers may hold special conferences among them selves to solve their own prob lems This statement by the sec retary was interpreted by some persons here as designed to open House Rejects Price Ceiling on Dwellings Washington house re jected by a thumping 154 to 68 vote Friday an administration pro posal to put price ceilings on all existing dwellings The action left in the legislation a provision for pricing new houses but an effort is expected lalcr to strike this provision also Opponents of the price ceilings on existing dwellings said they would drive housing sales into the black market Proponents argued that the ceilings are needed to stop speculation that isrunning up the price a veteran must pay for a house Rep Pafman D author of the administration bill told the house that President Trumans veterans housing program can not be a success without ceilings on existing homes The language stricken from the bill would have permitted an ex isting house to sell for any price the owner could get but this first sale would set the ceiling and the dwelling could sell for no higher price during the housing emerg ency As the administration bill con tinued under attack a probability increased that the house might ap prove a republican substitute The opposition kept up a run ning fire with a contention that the administration program which proposed the use of 5600000000 in subsidies would hamstring the building industry and result in 6 No nation has the right to fewer not more houses help itself to property in con quered or liberated territory un til its share has been fixed by allied agreement The Russians are reporled by many sources to have carted away much industrial ma terial Manchuria since the end of the Japanese war as well as to have stripped eastern Ger many and other occupied portions eastern Europe approved by would then be submitted to UAW locals at GMs 92 plants throughout the nation for ratification but this was re garded as a mere formality since the locals customarily follow the fGcoTniTreridaiioii officers and the conference dele gates STASSEN HAS NO ANNOUNCEMENT Visits Governor Blue Speaks in Des Moines MINOT NDAK WATER TOWN MINNEAPOLIS SI PAUL ROCHESTER ABERDEEN SDAK CTHURON SIOUX FALLS MASON CITV IOWA DES MOiNES OTTUMWA AIRLINE MAP MAY City will be on the mainline system of MidContinent airlines beginning March 15 as shown by the map above The system extends from Minot N Dak and the Twin Cities southward to St Louis Mo Kansas City Tulsa Okla and New Or leans If a recommendation by one of its examiners is approved by the civil aeronautics board feeder lines will extend the MidContinent system eastward to Milwaukee and Chicago connecting at Mason City with the mainline Strikes At a Glance Dog Is Jealous Over Husbands Affection Laramie Wyo Wat kins and his sisters dog had their differences which were ignored by Watkins until recently His wife drove him to work and as he leaned to kiss her goodbye DRAKE EDUCATOR GOES TO SAMOA Des nioiites Arthur A Morrow of the Drake univer sity law school Friday was or his way to the island of Samoa where he will serve as chief justice of the high court He will be 1 of 3 justices of the high court and will serve a 2 year term The Samoan legisla ture has requested however that Morrow be made a permanent judge of the islands Morrow left Des Moines by plane Wednesday and Mrs Mor row and their children Jane 11 and John 15 plan to leave as soon as surface transportation is available DCS Moines E Stas sen former governor of Minnesota and mentioned frequently in poli tical circles as a possible republi can candidate for president said Friday he had no announcement to make beyond this year I plan o concentrate this oi the election of young republ can war veterans to congress he said at a news conference in con nection with a call on Gov Robert D Blue Stasseii was here o ad dress a public forum Friday niffht Stassen who recently was sepa rated from the navy in which he served as a captain on the staff of Admiral Halsey declined to discuss his views of the prospects of continued peace the future of the United Nations organization or peacetime military prepared ness He said he would go into these subjects in his forum ad dress Three years ago Stassen sug gested formation ot an interna tional peace group and he at tended the United Nations con ference in San Francisco last sum mer as an American delegate PEROlKElPS ELECTION LEAD Buenos Aires Juan D Peron led Dr Jose Tamborini for the 68 crucial Buenos Aires elec toral votes Friday and maintained a small nationwide lead in the presidential election returns Peron had 57443 popular votes nationwide to 53862 for Tambo rini and was leading in the count for 168 electoral college votes I Tamborini clinched 10 electoral voles in San Luis province the first province to finish counting and was leading for 62 in other provinces By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS About 985000 workers idle in continuing labor disputes Major developments ELECTRICAL CIO pickets and sympathizers tor the 3rd straight day ptento attempt to crash police lines at strikebound General Electric plant in Philadelphia Thursdays violence brings threat from CIO union leaders of a general strike call of 150000 CIO work ers Pennsylvania governor says he will send in state police and troops if necessary to maintain order CIO United Auto Workers and General Motors adjourn negotiations after morning session surrounded by some expectancy ends without agreement over issues in 101day old strike no comment no statement following discussions with GM president UAWCIO GM council opens 3day meeting in Detroit strike of some 250000 telephone workers still scheduled for March 7 but federal conciliators arrange for resumption of negotiations in New York Sunday between the American Telephone and Telegraph company and the Federation of Long Lines Telephone Workers 600000 of the 750000 CIO United Steel Workers who were on strike for 4 weeks covered by new contracts roost of them granting cents hourly wage hikes steel industry moving rapidly back to normal fabricating plants employing about 188000 still strikebound bT I Gardner Cowles Succumbs at heDes Moines on 85th Birthday Newspaper Publisher Was Close Friend of ExPresident Hoover Des Moines Gardner Cowles Sr publisher of the Des Moines Register and Tribune died Thursday night at p m in his home here on his 85th birthday I The publisher Who attained naj tional distinction in the newspaper field was in the investment and banking business for 20 years be fore he acquired control of Des Moines Register and Leader in 1903 Cowles was a close friend of former President Hoover who drafted him to serve as director of the reconstruction finance cor poration in 1932 Although invited to continue in the government post Cowles resigned to return to Des Moines after one year When advised of Cowles death Hoover said Thursday night in Washington that Cowles had been I GARDNER COWLES SR a great citizen of the midwest Iowa the son of a Methodist min ister and made his home in Iowa CAB EXAMINER RECOMMENDS 2 FEEDER ROUTES Proposed Lines Will Join With Twin Cities Des Moines and East The first step in getting direct airline connections between Mason City and Chicago has been taken it was revealed Friday in a re port by Merrill Ruhlen examiner for the civil aeronautics board recommending that MidContinent airlines be granted temporary certificates for 2 feeder lines through Mason City The recommendations were in cluded in Ruhlens report in Wash ington D C Thursday recom mending a large expansion of air lisie service in the norfh central stales with improved connections to he cast and west coasts The case involving 24 applicants and an area bounded by Great Falls Mon Denver Omaha and Chicago now goes to the CAB for decision One of the feeder lines affecting Mason City would operate from colerminals at Chicago and Mil waukee to the Twin Cities by way of Bockford and Freeport 111 Dubuque Waterloo and Mason City Iowa and Austin Albert Lea Rochester Mankato and Faribault Minn The other line would operate between Des Moines and the Twin Cities by way of Faribault Man kato Rochester Austin and Al bert Lea Minn and Mason City Waterloo and Marshalltown Iowa MidContinent officials at Des Moines explained that if it Is elveu the Chicago and Milwaukee to Sioux City route the Iowa cities listedwoulflbe servedon 2 routes slops made as soon as the ciiies can provide the proper facil ities for commercial air service A spokesman for he airline said the probable southern route would be from the Illinois points to Clinton TriCilios Muscaline Ce dar Hapids Oskaloosa and Des Moines thence westward The northern route would run from Des Moines to Marshalltown Waterloo Cedar Rapids Dubuque and on into Illinois The recommendation is subject to several restrictions including one that all flights serving Des Moines and Chicago shall either ongmate or terminate at Sioux City or points west or shall sched ule stops at no less than 4 points between Des Moines and Chicago Another recommendation was that Parks Air Transport Inc be granted a temporary certificate to serve between Jhe terminal points Chicago and Des Moines via the intermediate points Aurora Min dota LaSalle Princeton Peoria Kewanec Jhc TriCilfes Gales burg Monmoulh Burlington Ol fumua AJbia and Knoxville sub ject to the restriction that all flights shall schedule stops at at least 4 intermediate points Ruhlen recommended that the board turn down applications of American Chicago Southern Eastern Transcontinental West ern and United Airlines all of which now have operating certifi cates and a large number of new airlines which had sought to es tablish feeder services in the area Ruhlen also recommended that the board turn down applications of Wisconsin Central Black Hills Airlines Bos Air Cargo and Bur lington Transportation Co be cause he said they are controlled by surface carriers Burlington had proposed service with 7passenger twinmotor heli copters It is a subsidiary of Chi cago Burlington Quincy rail road and of our nation as a whole In 1934 Cowles established and endowed the Gardner Cowles F foundation to aid Iowa colleges and Iowa Wesleyan colleges and charitable institutions In became superintendent of schools during his entire lifetime After attending Perm Grinnellj en Weather Report he dition to gifts from the fund for a number of educational institu tions a gift has been made for a Negro community center building in Des Moincs in honor of he late Wendell Willkie Cowles was born in Oskaloosa at Algona Iowa and during 18 FORECAST Disclose Army Planned Floating Iceberg Airport i of the weirdest stories of the war came to light how the allies planned to create a 2000000ton self propelled iceberg as a floating airfield As blueprinted by tlic British Hie fantastic aircraft carrier would the position he also was a partner 1 in a weekly newspaper published t in Algona i Saturday slightly colder Friday night with lowest temperature 25 to 30 A friendly rival of Cowles in his Iowa Mostly cloudy and not so early newspaper days was Harvey Ingham who at one time was edi tor of The Upper Des Moines and associate editor of the Regisj ter and Leader Ingham has be come widely known as editor of with occasional south portion colder Friday the newspaper which his friend published chunk wide and 200 feet deep guns Unemployment High Bismarck N Dak Wil waler and wood pulp 2000 feet long 300 j liam Schantz state director of un employment compensation re ported Friday that unemployment claims in North Dakota hit an ailtime high last week More than 564000 was paid out in claims to 650 civilians and 2736 exservice men The peak of weekly pay ments before the war was S23000 Propelled by electric motors and defended by its own antiaircraft is it would have provided a north Atlantic base for airplanes hunting German submarines Its cost was estimated at 870000000 The project reached the point where a 1000ton mode was built on a Canadian lake and testedfor 6 months in 1943 before the idea was dropped according to an announcement released Thursday night in Ottawn London and Washington warm Friday rain extreme Clearing and night Minnesota Generally fair Friday night slightly colder extreme southeast portion and warmer northwest portion Saturday in creasing cloudiness and warmer IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statis tics for 24 hour period ending at 8 oclock Friday morning Maximum 50 Minimum 33 At 8 a m Friday 33 YEAR AGO Maximum 35 Minimum 20   

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