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Mason City Globe Gazette: Thursday, January 31, 1946 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - January 31, 1946, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME THE NEWSPAPER THAT MARK AIL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS MASON CITY IOWA THUSSDAT JANUAKg 31 1946 M ThU Paper Conslria ot Two Stctioo Ora NO BELIEVE WRECKAGE IS LOST PLANE Cry Discrimination in Army Family Move Congressmen Urge Action on grounds of discrimination were raised in both senate and house Thursday to the army plan for send ing families of officers and certain noncoms to overseas theaters at government expense The war department announcing the plan Wednesday said travel at government expense was authorized by law lor dependents of officers 3 top ranks of noncommissioned officers and certain civilian empoyes of the war department Families of other enlisted men would have to pay their own way Senator Lucas D Ill told the senate he thought thewar de partment ought to treat folks alike Instead of building up morale by the plan this will tear it down Senator Hatch D N Mex said it seemed that those who could least afford to pay were be ing required to pay He suggested putting all enlisted men on the In the house Rep Pace D Ga deplored the arrangement contending that privates and cor porals are less able to pay the ex penses than the higherpaid non coms In allowing the families to go abroad the army put the clincher on what it has been saying about occupation job The step has been advocated in and out of congress for months both as a stabilizing influence for the occupation forces and as a con tribution to morale Normally the army does not permit families to join men on ac tive service overseas unless they are engaged in strictly garrison duties such as in prewar days at the canal zone Hawaii and the Philippines The big tipoff of an extended occupation job was the announce ment that priority will go to fami lies of men agreeing to remain abroad 2 more years or at least 1 Personnel affected by the an nouncement are commissioned and warrant officers master first technical and staff sergeants and certain war department civilian Employes whose families are au thorized by law to travel at fed eral expense the time being at least de pendents of the lower enlisted tradeswillnot bepermttted to to overseas war department officials said because of a housing short age However the army was said t to be proposal to In ude them In the program later Even for families technically eligible there were some catches in the program announced late r Thursday by the war department Theater commanders must cer tify that adequate housing food and medical care is available Preference will be given families of those with the most service since Pearl Harbor Applications must originate with the men overseas not with their depend ents The war department indicated that the movement of the first de pendents to Europe is expected to start some time after April 1 A month later it will get under way to the Philippines Japan Korea and the Ryukyu island chain BLAZE AT SPILLVILLE Garage arid Implement Store Are Destroyed completely de stroyed the Klimesh Motor Sales company and the J J Swehla im plement shop here Thursday morning causing a loss estimated at 845000 In the garage managed by Charles Kltmesli were more than 10 cars and tracks all of which were burned The loss to the gar age is estimated at Only the walls remain of the Swehla implement shop where the loss is estimated at 55000 large cattle truck of James Silhacek a trudc owned by the Boluska Construction company oi Protivin and a car owned by County Supervisor Joseph Sweh Ja were included in the loss As a result of the fire 6 men in the community were out of em ployment The garage was built about 12 years ago Fire companies from Becorah Calmar and Protivin assisted the Spillville department in fighting the blaze The Klimesh residence near the garage started to burn but was saved by the Spillville firemen 45 Point Soldiers in Western Pacific Due for Home Sweet Home Manila Pacific army headquarters announced Thursday that all enlisted men with 45 or more points or 34 or more months active service as of Feb 28 are being called into dis position centers for return to the United States The call excepted critical spe cialists volunteers and army ai forces personnel By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Forty congressmen called on the J S Steel and General Motors corporations Thursday to accept federal recommendations for etting strikes in the steel and lutomobile industries At the same time General Motors executives arranged to re sume negotiations with the CIO United Auto Workers in Detroit a spokesman for the CIO Packing louse Workers contended the gov ernment had assumed a moral obligation to boost their wages and CIO President Philip Murray met with Secretary of the Treas Frad M Vinson The congressmens recommen dations were contained in a round robin letter made public in Wash ngton by Rep Hook D Mich It urged GM to accept a fact finding boards recommendation or a wage increase of 19 cents an hour and asked U S Steel to agree to President Trumans pro posalfor an 18 cents hourly wage hike No iowa or Nebraska congressmen were among the signers of the letter The proposal came as early hopes for a settlement of these 2 major strikes appeared tri dim Ralph Heisfelif CIO jtfeatWorkerstold a federal factfinding board In Washington that the government interfered with the unions right to strike when it seized the strikebound meat industry last Saturday and that it now must see to it that equity and justice is done Although the purpose of Mur rays visit with Vinson was not officially announced a treasury official who declined to use of his name said he under stood it concerned existing tax legislation Murray has contended present tax laws permit the steel industry to derive financial ben efits despite the strike A wage dispute which threat ened to tie up 3 Ohio power com panies serving 250000 customers was settled in Washington LEADING UNO FIGURES Henri Spaak president of the UNO assembly shakes hands with Trygve Lie nominated secretarygeneral of the UNO as Gladwyn Jebb executive secretary of Wheat Crop in Bathroom Burlington Get over here quick if you want to harvest your wheat crop is what Harold Miller Burlington telephoned the man who replastered the bathroom in the Miller home 3 weeks ago When the plasterer arrived he found Harold had not been kidding 2inch sprouts of wheat protruded from the walls and ceiling of the bathrooml Instead of the skyblue color the room had been painted after the plastering the bright green of the sprouts dazzled the amazed Millers and the plasterer Investigation disclosed thesubstitute sand substance used in the plasterliadbeeix shipped to the distributor in a freight car formerly shipping wheat The moisture in the plaster warm1 e mosure n e paser anhe warm temperature in the bathroom did the rest toward making good condi tions for the growth of the cereal The plasterer made good the UNO looks on at Church House Westminister Lon don Wednesday night AP Wirephoto via radio from London K and A engr Delegates Feel Real Winner in RussianIran Dispute Is United Nations Organization london UNO delegates agreed almost unanimously Thurs day that the real winner in the Iranian dispute was the united na tions organization itself Mjirse 49 rsmall nations were proud of the decided in heated debate to hand the Iranlanfcnsslan dis pnte back to the 2 nations for bilateral negotiations without lhe Terms WAG Report on Hospital as Unfair Mt Pleasant report of a captain that dietary con ditions at the Mt Pleasant state hospital were unsatisfactory has been termed onesided and un fair by Dr Adolph Soueek su perintendent of the hospital Dr Soueek said Wednesday hat her report failed to mention the extreme handicap under which dietary service at the hospital mustbe carried on Capt Mary ONeal food service supervisor at Ft Des Moines told the legislative interim committee that sanitary conditions at the in situation were far from satis factory and that inmates got enough calories daily for only a maintenance diet Capt ONeal made the study after board of control members had conferred with officers at Ft Des Moines concerning the preparation of food for large groups It has been virtually impossi ble to obtain a trained dietitian since the beginning of the war Dr Soueek said adding that much of the work had fallen to mental patients Wermuth Denies Philippines Marriage IOWA WHISKY LIMIT IS CUT Allotment Sliced in Half for February Moines reduction in the whisky limit at state liquor stores from two fifths to one for February was announced Thurs day by thestate liquor control commission The limit thereafter has not been decided The commission made the fol lowing statement ih explanation Chicago Arthur Wer muth famed one man army of Bataan was shown a picture Thursday of the nurse who claims he married her in the Philippines and admitted he sort of recog nized the girl But that wasnt any bridal pic ture like she says he added quickly It was Just apicture taken after a party inManila I cant even remember the date The photo forwarded from Ma nila where Josephine Oswald 24 year old civilian nurse has filed an annulment suit against Wer NOT WEDDING Arthur Wermuth at a Chicago hotel Wednesday night looks at an AP Wirephoto transmission of a picture which Olivia Oswald of Manila P I says was made on the day of her wedding to Wermuth He said This picture was taken after a party in Manila I deny emphatically that this had anything to do with a wedding AP Wirephoto K and A engr IfO muth bore the legend Memor able wedding Dec 7 1941 And below the picture of 2 men and 2 women in afternoon attire were the words war bride Wermuth who has one bride Jean of 11 years standing studied the picture carefully tell ing reporters I emphatically deny this has anything to do with a wedding Wermuth accompanied by his wife said he would have no fur ther comment until after he had conferred with his attorney Thurs day The major who first had denied knowing Miss Oswald said the picture refreshed his memory He added however that he hardly knew the girl let alone being married to her In Manila Miss Oswald com mented angrily that it certainly is one of the most peculiar cases of amnesia I ever heard of She said she and the major were married in Manila the day before Pearl Harbor on the roof garden of the Great Eastern hotel by a U S army chaplain She exhibited a gold wedding ring inscribed ArthurJosie embellished with orange blossoms and the date Dec 7 Miss Oswald employed in an army provost marshal office in Manila said Werronth was a changed man after his release from a Japanese prison camp He was af war hero and wasnt wanted She said that she had pleaded to go with him when he returned to the United States but he had told her he was coming back t settle down in thePhilippines While Wermuth was enroute to the U S Miss Oswald said she learned through newspaper stories that he had a wife in Traverse City Mich Asked if she still were in ove with him she answered heatedly The only thing I want now Is I to be free um 3san The UNO took a breathing spell Thursday while its overworked Secretariat tried to catch up with of the change Whisky sales in December when the limit was three fifths greatly exceeded estimates and reduced our inventories accord ingly The truckers strike during December and January now set tled placed additional burdens on the railroads causing embar goes to become necessary at many places including Des Moines This resulted inserious delays in transportation of our supplies To date only 60 per cent of our January allocation of whisky has been received Therefore the ne cessity of the one bottle fifth limit would be after February 1 Dick R Lane chairman said the commission was unable now to tell what the limit would be after Feb We dont know what our allo cation from the distillers will be he explained The distillers make monthly allotments to us They have been cut back on the use of grain and in February they will be forced to cut their use of grain 25 per cent below what they were permitted to use in January SETFpOD PLASMA BANK St Lonis Mo Ameri can Red Cross announced Thurs day theshipment of 5535 units of blood plasma for the use ofcivil ian physicians and hospitals in Iowa has been begun from its warehouse here Dr Raymond F Barnes mid western director of medical and health services for the Red Cross said the shipment of blood plasma declaredsurplus by the army and navy would make available one he mass of paper work which ms almost overwhelmed it No meetings were scheduled In the inevitable postmortem about who won delegates ap praised the test as an auspicious start for the new organization It was a middle of the road com promise providing facesaving actors for soviet union Iran and the council itself Delegates felt that the council operation would help dispel some if the cynicism aand pessimism that the UNO would be only an other league debating society The pattern and precedent set if continued gives hope of a rev olutionary change in old styL diplomacy Delegates and observers drew 2 major conclusions 1 The Iranian case has set up a valuable series of procedura precedents for developing open door diplomacy and publicly air ing disputes 2 Wednesdays council session proved that the soviet union can take it in public thus answer ing fears of some skeptics tha the Russiansare not iaterestei in the UNO and would take th first opportunity to abandon it i arraigned before public opinion The council roles will be re versed Friday when the Rus sians will press charges that th British have created a threat U peace with their troops in Greec complete unit of the lifesavin substance to every licensed physi cian and surgeon in Iowa hospital Ernest Bevin of Britain wh helped the Iranian case Thursda will defend Britain Friday lowan In Japan Kaidaichi Japan IF Cp Richard J Timmer of Preston Iowa was one of the first 3 Amer ican soldiers officially to occup this southern Japanese village H arrived with another corpora soon after Lt George E Simon o West Allis Wis had jeeped int the village Souse Begins Debate Over Strike Bill Washington house leared the way Thursday for con ideration of broad legislation to urb industrial strife On a roll call vote the members eclded to begin debate at once n the bill by Rep Case R S ak to control strikes The measure is a substitute for actfinding legislation asked by resident Truman It is backed by powerful coalition of republi ans and southern democrats Debate on the legislation started immediately but a is not xpected until at least Saturday nd probably not until next week However house leaders who sked not to be named predicted o newsmeri that Thursdays vote meant the Case substitute will be pproved in about its present orm However the bills opponents vould not acknowledge defeat hey predicted a bitter frght to he end These congressmen hiefly close friends of organized abor termed Jhe substitute bill ne designed to breaV unions The Case bill is an attempt to smash labor Rep Marcantonio eclared at a rules committee hearing It would bring back the ellow dog contract and allow all he other abuses of workers vhich used to prevail many years opponents of the Case jlan told newsmen however that heir chief hope of killing the pro osal is to keep it so stringent that the senate will refuse to ap rove it or Mr Truman later will reto it The Case bill would establish a abormanagement mediation board which would try to settle disputes it found affected the pub ic interest In addition the meas ure would 1 Require mutual observance of contracts by employers and employes 2 Deny collective jargaining or reemployment rights to workers using organized Boycotts orrviolenctsirjiiiiiaUot go ABANDON HOPE FOR 21 MISSING IN BIG AIRLINER Aerial Search Finds Wreckage on Top of Wyoming Mountain Denver for the lives f 21 persons aboard a missing Jnited Air Lines transport vir tually was abandoned Thursday after an aerial search disclosed what was believed to be the wreckage of the plane high on snowcovered Elk mountain 65 miles northwest of Laramie Wyo Capl Frank Crismon assistant supervisor of flight operation iere led the aerial search which began at daylight when the plane was several hours overdue in a flight from Seattle to New York along he Denver Omaha and Chicago route About midmorning he said he sighted a long wide gash in the deep snow near the top of Elk mountain which towers 11125 feet in the eastern fringe of the Rockies He said broken clouds and a stiff wind made close ap proach to the peak impossible Crismon did not report any signs of fire or a definite sighting of the smashed plane but said he was convinced that what he saw marked the crash of the transport UAL officials here speculated that the body of the plane might be buried in the deep snow Crismon returned to Cheyenne about 10 miles east of Elk Moun tain to organize a ground search party but it was expected to be many hours before they could reach the remote Medicine Bow range area Eighteenpassengers and a crew of 3 were aboard the 2engine Douglas transport including 12 army personnel being redeployed Pacific coast Among the civilinn passengers were Mr arid Beucler of ecutibn of management if it used violence to make workers come a terms 4 Deny employe rights to unions of uipervisorj workers v uiuiws OL supervisor worKers uch as foremenand 5 Repeal m tnc fllSht having many of the prieut antlsK a rBPOrt txvm laws by permitting issuance measure which would set up the wards asked by Mr Truman but would deny them the subpoena power and make no provision for a cooling off period while the boards met Claims Teeth Jarred Loose by Atom Bomb Washington atomic bomb which fell on Nagasaki liter ally jarred loose the teeth of those who survived and left some with radioactive gold fillings It also caused many to lose their hair but no one would be com pletely bald This was reported Thursday by Comdr Joseph Timmes of the navy medical corps who examined some of the living victims ap proximately a month after the bomb blast He also said the radiation sick ness produced a form of anemia due directly to the fact that rays from the bomb interfered with the functions of the bone one of the principal manufacturing sites of red blood cells ftuttYVAHJ nicti uuujjs in vrreec Some victims he said in a and Indonesia Foreign Secretary report in the naval medical bulle tin also showed a deficiency of of white blood pro tective mechanism against disease invasion Even though those effects were noted Timmes said the victims did not absorb radiant large amounts energy in lowan Dies Des Moines F Stark 43 sales promotion manager for Meredith Publishing company died at a hospital Wednesday af ler suffering a cerebral hemorrhage STRIKES AT A GLANCE By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS x idle because of labor disputes approximately 1360000 Major developments issue now involved in dispute between Gen eral Motors and CIO United Auto Workers as corporation says it is unwilling to renew any maintenance of union membership clause in a new contract union rejects companys renewal of 13A cent hourly wage increase negotiations to be resumed Thursday Henry Ford II demands federal government list price controls warns that Ford company plants faced with complete shutdown unless lr it gets steel promptly strike of nearly 750000 CIO steelworkers in lltii day with 54000 workers in related industries made idle settle ment of wage dispute reportedly hinging on whether government will have a supallow steel price increase ready to call for test vote on whether consideration to new strike control bill which has broader pro io force managementto come Ho Ti The accident first fatal mishap on United AirLines in almost 4 years probably occurred around 4 Jinclair Wyo a few miles to the Names of the soldiers were withheld pending notification bf the next of kin Airline officials estimated UAt planes had flown 1700000000 passenger miles since their last previovis fatal accident May 1 1942 United Airlines announced the following G civilian passengers were aboard the missing airliner H R Glover Vancouver Wash ington bound from Portland to New York Mrs E H Blake Richmond Wash bound from Pendleton Ore to Denver William A Petracek American overseas Marvin Whit lock La Guardia field bound from Seattle to New York Mr and Mrs G A Bender Sheffield 111 bound from Boise to Chicago R S Pirie New York bound from Seattle to Chicago The airlines said it could hot disclose namesot military person nel aboard Crew members on the plane were Captain Walter P Briggs pilot Portland Harry M Atlas first officer Portland Dorothy Jean Carter steward ess Hayden In Reno Los Angeles flp Times said Thursday that film player Stirling Hayden is in Reno Nev to file suit for divorce from Ac tress Madeleine Carroll Weather Report FORECAST Mason CHy Clear and quite cold Thursday night with low tem perature about zero Iowa Clear and diminishing winds Thursday night continued cold Friday fair and warmer Minnesota Increasirig cloudiness Thursday night Not so cold west portion Mostly cloudy Friday with light snow in north por tion Warmer south portion IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics for 24 hour period ending at 8 oclock Thursday morning Maximum 33 Minimum At 8 a m Thursday l Precipitation 05 Snow YEAR AGO Maximum g f Minimum i 14   

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