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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: January 24, 1946 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - January 24, 1946, Mason City, Iowa                             1 t I I NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDSTED FOR THE HOME HltTOnV ANB AftCMI ilOlNES THE NEWSPAPER THAT VOL MAKES ALL NORTH iOWANS NEIGHBORS Associated Press and United Press Full Leased Wires Five Cents a Copy MASON CITY IOWA THURSDAY JANUARY 24 1946 STOCK OARS Mdj Paper Consists ot Two SectionsSection One I V IsAKHAUN V 8IKJN Atomic Bomb Test Against Naval Ships such ato PHOENIX OUNIr IS OALM1 GILBERT K WHERE ATOMIC BOMB WILL BE locate Bikini atoll in the Marshall islands where the ef fects of an atom1 bomb on warships and transports will be tested this spring Inset locates Bikini in relation to other important islands in the Marshall group AP Wirephoto K and A engx 3JC 3J flCJp JAP BATTLESHIP TO BE ATOMIC GUINEA 32720 ton Japanese battleship Nagato will be one of the fleet of 97 vessels on which the atomic bomb will be tested in an experiment expected to revolutionize sea warfare AP Wirephoto K and A engr Congress Drive Is Underway to Put Heat on Management Washington efforts to put the heat on manage tioned by the administration Several of Biemillers colleagues told a reporter his figures came from the white house Biemiller would say only that they repre sent a compilation by OPA and the labor department and that I was asked to make them public so people would know the situa tion The national capita was moved to Princeton in 1783 because of a mutiny of troops which menaced congress at Philadelphia tc The drive is being sparked oy foes of proposals for stern regula tionof industrial sfnfe and some of these lawmakers claim the white employers to at East turn on the struck advocated speedy abolition or moc 3 S6na 0rS tax rebates to corporations 1946 profits drop below prewar levels Sponsors this plan including one congressman with reported white house backing disclosed a program for frequent floor speeches defending labor and criticizing employers lor their position in present strikes Presidential support was claimed for a house address in which Rep Biemiller D Wis asserted ear lier in the week that the U S Steel company would have made money if it had accepted the wage compromise advanced by President Truman BieraiHer saifl the company would have added yearly to its income through a a ton price boost while paying out 8180000000 in increases at the suggested 185 cents an hour gain The S4 price boost re portedly would have been sane SPAATZ dent Truman Thursday an nounced Gen Carl A Spaatzs appointment to be chief of the army air forces succeeding Gen Henry H Hap Arnold The president iold his news conference that General Ar nold will retire upon his return from his current South Ameri can tour and that Spaatz will take over his assignment A war department source said the change would probably be made Feb 15 BIKINI ATOLL IS SITE FOR TEST OF ATOM BOMB Operation to Start in May on 97 US Nazi Jap Vessels Washington tff The navy lised the curtain Thursday on its Jans for testing the atomic bomb igainst a great armada of fighting an experiment expected to volutionfze sea warfare A guinea pifr fleet of 97 vessels ranging from carriers and battle ships submarines and transports to an assortment of smaller craft h as landing ships will be the pmic target in the vast opera tion to start in May The laboratory selected is the anchorage of Bikini Atoll one of northernmost of the Marshall lands which wore wrested from Japan by amphibious assault 2 years ago Vice Adm W H P Blandy head of the navys division on special weapons ticked off for the senate atomic energy committee these details of the epochal ex periment known by the codeword operation 1 In the target fleet will be 50 operating aircraft car riers 4 battleships 2 cruisers 16 destroyers 8 submarines and 15 transports from U S fleets plus a German heavy cruiser a Japa nese battleship and light cruiser 47 of other craft such as landing ships 2 The undertaking is not a combined or international opera tion but rather a scientific exper iment by the United Sates govern ment alone The question of per mitting foreign observers has not yet been decided 3 The unmanned target ships will be anchored and placed in a manner calculated to give ef fects varying from probable de struction to negligible damage in each type 4 The first test early in May ills for detonating an atomic mb at an altitude of several hundred feet above the target ves sels A 2nd testtentatively set for July l will be an atomic burst at the waters surface in the target 5 A deep water test in the open sea is planned later but technical difficulties preclude its coming off this year 6 Task Force fleet of 50 additional U S navy ships with a complement of 20000 men set up the experiment and make arrangements for recording its results by all modern scientific techniques Blandy revealed that some of the bestknown units of the U S fleet had been marked for target vessels They include The Saratoga oldest U S car rier afioat which carried the fight from Guadalcanal to Jap home waters the cruiser Salt Lake City the one ship fleet of Solomons fame the battleships Pennsyl vania and Nevada two Pearl Har bor victims that came back from near destruction to slug out the rest of the war the Arkansas oldest battlewagon in the navy and the new York veteran of ac tion from north Africa to Oki nawa The crusier carrier Inde pendence also will be a target Japanese participants will be the 32720 ton battleship Nagato where she later was captured The German entry is the 10000 ton Prinz Eugen which has just arrived in Boston from Europe This heavy cruiser was accom panying the Bismarck when a British force caught up with that battleship and sank it In his statement prepared for the atomic committee Blandy de scribed the purpose of the experi ment as primarily to determine the effects of the atomic bomb upon naval vessels in order to gain information of value to the national defense The ultimate re sults of the tests so far as the navy is concerned will be their transla tion into terms of U S seapower Secondary purposes are to af along with navy personnel Besides the military he said ob servers will include members of congress press and U S civilian scientific groups NO 92 DECKERS I CARS MOVE INTO moved into the Jacob E Decker and Sons packing plant Thursday noon through the picket line maintained by the local union of the packing house workers organizing committee CIO At first the trainmen pushed 2 cars as far as the gates of the packing plant leaving them standing on railroad prop erty but on a downhill grade so that they could have been pinched into place by hand Later however the switch en gine returned and pushed them on into the plant Union members made no attempt Thursday to prevent the move ment of the cars intended for the shipment of 2000 hogs caught in the strikebound plant a week ago and which the plant management states it has made arrangements to sell elsewhere Lock photo K and A engr Old Wages Offered in Packing Seizure t Unions Still Undecided on Work Return By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS President Truman said Thurs day that meat workers would re turn at their old wages when the government seizes rthe meat pack ing industry Saturday but wheth er any ot the 263000 strikers would work for the government still was up in the air Edgar L Warren chief of the federal conciliation service told reporters in Washington Tuesday he had been assured by T J Eloyd an official of the AFl Meat Cutters and Butchers union that the 70000 AFL strikers would re turn for the government However the union telegraphed all its locals Thursday within an hour after the presidents state ment to stand by for instructions from our general office Leaders of the 193000 striking CIO Meat Workers union have called a strategy meeting for Fri day to decide whether to return to work The AFL telegram toits locals signed by Earl Jimerson union president and other international officers told them not to be mis led by reports of the action of the Amalgamated regarding re turning to work Lewis J Clark president of the CIO United Packinghouse Work ers union said the unions rank and file would decide whether to return to work under a federal boss and the conditions under which they will go back to work Secretary of Agriculture Ander son said in Washington that all meat products from government operated plants would continue to be sold under present OPA retail ceilings In other lator developments flagship of Admiral Tamamoto the wars outbreak and the 6000 TiSer The Na worKer goto was damaged in the closing against the nations 3 largest pro phases of tattle of teyte Gnlf ducers were resumed in wtsMng m Ortnnpr 1H41 nnrt m around the country joint media tion conferences on the strike of 200000 CIO electrical workers I T X in were resumea in wasm 1944 aa again in Jnly ton violence broke out again m 1945 when a carrier strike caught picket lines around Cincinnatis Her in Japanese home waters steel plants and some 1500 strik h ing truck drivers jn st a secret vote on a wage settle ment proposal of truck owners The nresidenfcaiso said the steel GAXLE ARMSTRONG Meat Czar AP TCinpbolc spokesman said the roads had agreed to set up a panel to ne gotiate with its grievance commit tee The brotherhood had charged the roads with contract violations As the government set up ma chinery for running the struck packing plants there remained a possibility that 133000 of the 263 000 packing house workers on strike would not end their walk out which started Jan 15 CIO union leaders conducting the strike planned a strategy meeting Friday to decide whether they would followthe action of the AFL union involved in the work stoppage and order the strikers to return to work for the government with the agriculture department in charge of opera tions Gayle G Armstrong assistant administrator of agricultures pro duction and marketing admini stration was to confer with ma jor packers Thursday Meanwhile factfinding hearings in the wage dispute continued as fresh meat supplies became more scarce daily In Detroit the CIO United Auto workers union planned to resume wage negotiations with Ford Mo tor company and Chrysler corpor ation In the General Motors strike now in its ninth week with would return at their old 175000 idle the company and f the stce industry evenunion made no move to i uiiLull 14U Illuvt HJ C3UI111 d IrfSL I talks on the unions demands for before an agreement on wages was a 30 per cent wage increase UNO Assembly Votes Setup for Atomic Energy Control London united nations general assembly voted unani mously Thursday for the creation a special atomic energy com mission urged by U S Secretary of State James F Byrnes as neces sary to save the world from an atomic armaments race The action came after little more than an hour ot discussion during an hour of discussion duriui which both Byrnes and chief so vie delegate Andrei Vishinsky prompt action The vote was 47 to 0 with 4 na tions abstaining Almost simultaneously the worli security council announced that i would meet Friday to consider MOVE TO STOP LONG FILIBUSTER Washington UR Senate meet criaay to considei publicans Thursday began signing complaints involving Iran Greece a petition to limit senate debate and Indonesia and thus break a southern filibus ter against a permanent fair em ployment practices commission Republican leaders said that after the necessary 16 senators sign the cloture petition they will to have it considered by the sen ate To do that they will have to blast through a legislative morass defended by southern democrats who are trying to talk to death the bill to outlaw discrimination against employes because of race creed or religion Even if the senate considers the petition its chances of passage ap peared negligible It requires a twothirds vote Cloture has been invoked only 4 times since 1917 Sen Burnet R Maybank D S Car was scheduled to resume his talk Thursday as the southern fight against the FEPC went into its 2nd week Mice Men Win Over Women for Nylons Marlboro Mass if Three mice gave several men a break in a nylon hosiery line Wednesday when the rodents escaped from a box being unloaded from a truck the women fhe men made of braver stuff just moved queue up to the head ofi the Agree on Wages Des Moines The Electrical Workers Union Local 449 AFL and the Iowa Power Light com pany have agreed upon a wage schedule it was announced Wed nesday The union had voted to authorize a strike last December reached tually is seized The president added however he thought it was not practical to seize the strikebound steel indus try at this time and reiterhted his belief that the industry should grant the 18i cents hourly wage increase he recommended i ciubvu uy stride lorce iiuuu worKers He would the steel in boosting countrys idle because df labor disputes to 1635000 Strike Picture At a Glance By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Coal mines closed by steel strike force 14000 workers off job me oieei dustry would not be seized even tually if the strike is prolonged however Brightest development on the ford training anTy air 3T Jfttt mine the effect of the atomic bomb upon military installations and equipment Blandy stressed that the cross Chicago Charles J Car 58 a vice president of the Major developments procesds with plans to take over operation BB j of countrys strikebound meat packing plants Saturday but whether ey 58 a vice President the 193000 striking CIO employes will return to work remains undecided Cudahy Packing Co died at his pending union meeting Friday 70000 AFL workers to end strike home Wednesday which started Jan 16 over wage dispute Carney had been associated and management turned anew to President Tru with the meat packing firm since u J y llOUU union and management turned anew to President Truwith the meat packing firn on J shuttle railroads a vital iink man for solution of paralyzing 4day old steel strike U S Steel 1908 when he started as a IL J10 grreSht for 21 conpresident proposes national wago policy urges Mr Truman to call n its Wichita Kans offic verging major railroads m Chiconference of industrial leaders union committee recommends gov1 later served in Kansas Ci PrnmStltnWTprf cfppt nlnnf fir tia A i i erging major cago An agreement on issues in the roads operation waTa JoTnt effort m every sense with representa hood of railroad ead tives of army ground and air forces ers and officials of thf 3 roads and avihan icientlste participating Details were not disclosed alOnff With Maw m The complaints provide the basis for the first major tests of the UNOs machinery to settle dis putes Byrnes who came to the UNO meeting primarily to work on creation the atomic commission planned to leave within a matter of Thursday and certainly Friday American offi cials said The commission would have iiu power to compel the United States or any other country to disclose any of its atomic energy produc tion secrets or disclose how the atomic bomb is made according to interpretations given by Byrnes Its responsibility will be to work out ways of keeping atomic encrgj from beinff used destructively It will be composed of repre sentatives of the 11 nations on thi security council and Canada anc will be responsible to the counci for its work and policies Shortly before the assembly ses sion Byrnes told reporters that he had not been urging the security council to delay consideration of the complaints brought to it by Iran against Russia and by Russia against the British in Greece and Indonesia Most of the London press has been reporting for 2 days that Byrnes was bringing pressure lor delay that Russia was supporting his view and that the British for eign secretary Ernest Bevin was fighting to win immediate action Byrnes said Thursday he had never expressed any such view to any individual and that the subject had never come up in any meeting of the representatives ot the five principal powers Other officials said Byrnes had told Bevin the sooner the cases come before the council the bet ter PICKET LINE IS ROSSED AFTER COURTS ORDER Armour Gets Injunction to Stop Union From Barring Rail Shipment Employes of the M and St L moved stock cars through i union picket line into the Jacob 2 Decker and Sons plant in Ma on City Thursday noon following he issuance of u temporary in unction against the union re itraining its members from inter fering ivith such action The temporary injunction was ssucd late Wednesday by Judge M H Kepler Noribwoofl on the application of R F Clough atfor icy for Armour and Company Thursday the court set Friday aflernoon at oclock as the time for hearing a motion to set aside the injunction The motion was filed by George Dunn attorney for local 38 of the packinghquse workers organizing committee and denied that the union is interfering with those not on strike in their going to and from the plant The motion also denied that the union was conducting mass pick eting or that its members were standing on the railroad tracks so as to prevent the railroad from moving cars into the plant Any violation of such a kind were voluntarily corrected by the de fendants at least 2 days before the commencement of this action the motion stated Railroad employes at first push ed 2 stock cars up to the gates of the plant and left them standing on the railroad right of way Later however the switch engine relumed and pushed the 2 cars on info the plant and union officials stated that the picket line had been penetrated but without op position A J Costello president the local union left Thursday noon for Chicago to attend a meeting with the national strategy board of the PWOC and report back to his union what position they are to take when the federal govern ment takes over the local plant along with nearly 150 others across the nation now idle because the strike A mass meeting will be held at the local union hall 1150 N Federal Friday evening at oclock according to Clarence Hamsey chairman of the local Unions strategy board Costello expects to make a report by tele phone before the meeting Ram sey said The application for the injunc tion points out that the union has been picketing the local plant since the strike began at a m Jan Ifi and has prevented movement of box cars into the plant for the purpose of loading 2000 head of hogs which the man agement has made arrangements to sell If members of the union should interfere with railroad cars being moved into or out of the plant they xvill make themselves liable in contempt ot court proceedings the company attorney explained when questioned Picketing will continue at the plant declared Costello and Ram sey following a conference with their attorney The injunction does not prohibit the union from doing anything that it is now doing they explained a state ment The union is going to com ply with the injunction as issued by Judge Kepler and already is complying with it Officers and members of the union upon whom the injunction was served Wednesday evening received it quietly from deputy sheriffs Costello commenting we expected you fellows this morn ing Cudahy Vice President Succumbs in Chicago when he started as a clerk offices He ity be conerence o nustria leaders union committee recommends govlater served in Kansas City be ernmentowned steel plant facilities be made available for private I fore coming to Chicago in 1920 as The strike was scheduled de spite President Trumans appoint ment of an emergency mediation board but it was called oil shortly i before the deadline after union arbitration averts threatened strike of1500 trainmen employed on 3 shuttle railroads which serve all major lines converging in Chicago Brotherhood of Railroad Train men said railroads agreed to set up panel to negotiate with unions grievance committee United Auto Workers resume wage talks with Ford Motor company and Chrysler Corporation but union and General Motors make no move to seek resumption of negotiations strike of 175000 workers at GUI plants in 9th week assistant to the head purchasing agent He became head of the purchasing department in 1939 and a vice president in 1944 Survivors include his wife Ann Gertrude 2 daughters Mrs Joan Morrison and Gertrude Ann and 3 sons Charles J Jr Henry J and LL Bernard C Carney ot the army Weather Report FORECAST Mason City Fair and continued cold Thursday night with low est temperatures 510 above Friday increasing cloudiness and warmer Iowa Fair Thursday night colder in extreme east portion Friday increasing cloudiness warmer Minnesota Increasing cloudiness Thursday night Not so cold west and north portions Mostly cloudy with occasional light snow Friday becoming colder north and west portions in after noon IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics for 24 hour period ending at 8 oclock Thursday morning Maximum 33 Minimum 3 Snow 3 inches Precipitation 15 YEAR AGO Maximum Minimum 24 9 WTWKsnnn   

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