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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: January 21, 1946 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - January 21, 1946, Mason City, Iowa                                Sip v NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME Associated Press and United Prtis Pull Leased THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH 1OWANS NEIGHBORS Five Cents a Copy flIASON CtTy IOWA MONDAY JANUARY 21 1946 TRUMAN URGES SWEEPING PROGRAM m f AAA JV jfc 5fc o j One Man Opinion A Radio Commentary by W EARL HALL Managing Editor BROADCAST SCHEDULE KGLO Mason City Sunday a a W01 Ame Towdiy p m Jnincy HL Frldy 1 F Sioux CAj 5IS i Some Vagrant Memories of South perreting around in my desk 1 drawers the other day I cam across a little black notebook which liad served me on a 3 months factfinding trip through South America just before Amer icas entry into the war It served to bring back some pleasant mem cries of that stimulating exper ience as a guest of the Carnegie endowment for internationa peace One of the early pages in tha little black book recalled for me the February day when I first se foot on the South American con tineat It was at Barramjullla a city of abont 150000 Our line steamed into the murky estuary o the Magdalena river at sunset ani our party disembarked for a brie tour of inspection I had heard South fact all Latin to as a land of pronounced eco nomic extremes with a great mass of povertystricken people living alongside luxurious wealth that i scarcely rivaled in Chicagos gold coast or New Yorks Long Island Within a half hour of the tim I stepped down the gangplank a Barranquilla I was prepared to vouih for this as a proper des South America rjur tour led us through the slum sections of the city with its indescribable squalor through the business section of the city sur prisingly well maintained then up an elevation to a perfectly mag njficent residential section I Tiad seen enonnoul bridge between poverty a n d wealth Avhich is South America As later in the evening we sat in the patio of our elegant hotel the members of our Carnegie party compared notes on our ob servation AH of us had been im pressed by these 2 economic ex tremes and the apparent absence of what in our own country ire call the great middle class I wonder observed our farm magazine editor from Tevas whether in all history there is an instance of a nation achieving greatness without a middle class Well replied our Cincinnati editorial writer ancient Greece did pretty well with its system of freemen and slaves But somebody else recalled ancient Greece ultimately lost her to regain it in any thing like full measure I wouldnt have had to go fur ther than Barranquilla to confirm the fact that illiteracy and its inevitable accompaniment of pov erty are S Americas foremost problem A fortnight later I was in Peru clambering about the ruins of the Aztec and preAztec civiliza tion Adobe walls had stood for centuries because thanks to the Htraiboldt current off western SotSh America rains are almost an uriheard of phenomenon With Dr Julio Tello of San Slar cos university as guide I was con ducted through the museum fit that oldest institution in the west ern hemisphere 1 particularly recall one rotunda devoted to the lifelike reproduction of the old chieftains wearing the very clothes fonnd on them in their burial places The embroidered design on the woolen blankets would be the envy of any presentday worker in textiles both as to designand color Except for the deep pur pies which were derived from snails all of the dyes were of vegetable origin Their formulae have never been recaptured and there is none among South Amer icas Indians today who can even approach the textile skills of their forefathers The best of the work is as sumed by Dr Tello unsurpassed in the whole world as an archae ologist to have been done in a period before he birth of Christ A superarid climate is re sponsible for the perfect preser vation Although there are almost daiiy rains in the mountains 40 or 50 miles inland from Lima there are thousands living in that city who have never so much as seen a rain storm The decadence of the culture un der the Incas which I had noted in my earlier visit to Chan han further north in Peru was Evident in an even more marked Continued on Page 2 750000 STEEL WORKERSBEGIN GRIM WALKOUT Strike Blankets United States as Pickets Set Lines Pittsburgh strike oE 750000 CIO steelworkers for higher greatest strike in American history and one of the Mon day in grim quietness The strike blanketed the nation About 1300 plants ranging from the mills which make the steel to the shops which turn it into use ful things like railroad raits or can openers shut down in 30 states In Pennsylvania which pro duces onethird of the nations steel the strikers in snowy dark ness and freezing cold set in mo tion around the shutdown plants the long slow march of their picket lines Picket lines were set up elsewhere across the country No one here would guess how many days or weeks or months that march of the keep out of the plants anyone who might seek to take their jobs would continue It was a showdown fight be tween the steelworkers and the steelmakers This countrys hopes for a prosperous reconversion were involved critically because so much of American manufac turing uses steel and steel sup plies are very small A long drawn out strike could break the back of reconversion The steel to a steel industry authority will lose through the strike about 000000 a day in gross revenue it would have received on its steel sales if there had been ho strike The industrys average daily wage has been computed at At thatrate750000 workers lose each day they re main idle The strikers wage negotiations with the steel industry had gone on for months and finally broke down Friday despite the inter cession of President Truman who suggested a compromise The union accepted Mr Trumans pro posal for a wage increase of cents an hour The U s Steel cor poration rejected this figure and said it could not grant an increase of more than 15 cents an hour The union which at Mr Trumans request had postponed its sched uled walkout from Jan 14 then said the strike must begin It officially went into effect at Monday in each locality Actually the strike started 11 some plants last Friday after CIO United Steelworkers President Philip Murrays call for action So did picketing The vast majority of the workers finished their jobs Friday and Saturday The indus try began cooling off its furnaces then So by midnight Sunday most of the S Steel for in shut down or ready to shut down The union has been arranging with various companies to let naintenance crews pass through the picket lines so the plants will not suffer damage by their inac tivity Murray came here from Wash ngton Sunday and went to his lome But he will make a nation wide radio address at p m CST Monday There was no indication that he government would step in in lorne way to stop the strike All bat a handful of plants were affected by the strike The steel mill of Henry J Kaiser at Fon ana Calif was expected to con mue operations Kaiser signed an tgreement Saturday in Washing on with Murray granting the CIOs 1814 cents an hour wage demand The Wierton Steel company ith 10000 workers in its plants aWierton W Va and Steuben vilie Ohio was not struck Those vorkers have an independent union not connected with the CIO At Harrisburg Pa a CIO dis rict official George Medrick aid 5 Pennsylvania fabricating slants had signed at cents or better The danger of a longdrawn out attempt to move railroad stock cars into the Decker from which trying to move approximately 2000 hogs according YMrtlTl Oiirl nit 1 J i Picketers on Tracks Stop Cars Moving Into Deckers Picketers at the Jacob E Decker and Sons plant in Mason City which Showed no signs ending Monday as thef tramped in a ciVcle the the M and St L raU cars in The union reported that an attempt is being made by the plant approximately 2000 live hogs out of the plant by pailfrllf 5n II T ft r5i TV T AUUU vc uugs ouv 01 me plant by rail The hogs were caught in the plant when the packinghouse workers union strike began early Wednesday morning snaase Saturday afternoon the stock cars were pushed onto the siding as far as the picket line but after looking the situation over the train crew left with the switch engine Sunday afternoon aboul the engine and crew returned and remained until about p m when they left returning about Monday morning The plodding pickets kept lip Government Seizure on Meat Is Seen Chicago possibility of imminent government confronted the strikebound meat industry Monday As a factfinding board ap pointed by President Truman pre pared to open public hearings here Tuesday in the 6day old walk put high administrative quarters in Washington said that major packing plants might be seized in a day or two One influential government of ficial who declined use of his name said the question of seizure would be discussed in Washington Monday by high administration leaders He saw little hope of avoiding such action he told a reporter Mr Truman would have the fi nal word in any decision to use the seizure weapon this source said adding that the president op posed seizures in labor disputes except as a last resort The emergency presented by the nations fast dwindling meat supplies requires immediate dras tic action said this official Conciliation attempts here to end the walkout of 263000 CIO and AFL workers in the industry were deadlocked on the wage is A member of the factfinding board E E Witte expressed hope of a settlement within 2 weeks The already serious shortage of meat in the countrys markets might become even worse if 50 000 members of the unaffiliated National Brotherhood of Packing house Workers not now on strike join the walkout Don Mahon president of this union said that if present concili ation efforts fail thebrotherhood would file a 30day strike notice The CIO originally asked for a 25 cent an hour raise but later said it would accept 17 cents now and negotiate the balance The AFL was back to its original demand for a 20 cents boost and a minimum weekly wage after withdrawing an offer to settle for a conditional raise of 15 cents Packers involved have offered up to 10 cents more an hour Hi a OUt teel strike to that part of Amer can manufacturing which needs 40 to 50 per cent indicated in Washington y civilian production Adminis rator John Small He predicted a big share of the ations factories would have to hut down or curtail production I the strike lasts 2 weeks The eason Small supply of steel on and at many companies A plan for voluntary rationing steel held by warehouses and obbers went into effect Monday o conserve the available supply or emergency and public utility se NEW SABOT AGE IN HOLY LAND Jerusalem blew up a coast guard station at Givat Olga halfway between Telaviv and Haifa Sunday night injuring 4 British soldiers and one British oliceman authorities announced The new violence blamed by police on members of the Jewish resistance movement occurred vhile troops and police still were nvestigating outbreaks which caused 4 deaths in Jerusalem Sat urday A British announcement said a number of arrests had been made n connection with the explosion and policemilitary operations vere continuing night despite chilling hortliVest wind and temperatures which droppec to a low of 4 degrees below zero Monday morning There were more than 100 in the lineup Sun day afternoon but the number dropped to about 25 during the night A hut has been built up nearby of old timbers and paste board housing an oildrum stove at which the marchers can warm themselves in relays Hot coffee and soup are served periodically ou the line to help the morale also and during the flay a banjo and accordian pro vide music inside the hut The union has no objections to feed being shipped into the plant to feed the hogs according to Clarence Hamsey chairman of the unions strategy board but they oppose any attempt to move the animals out The management had plenty of warning of the strike to protect themselves against anything like jhis happening said Ramsey The farmers had less opportunity to protect themselves and we in tend to safeguard their market in this instance JESSIE PARKER IN STATE RAGE DCS Moines state Super intendent of Public Instruction Jessie M Parker Monday an nounced her candidacy for re election Miss Parker who is serving her second term formerly was prin cipal of the Lake Mills high school county superintendent of Winne bago county and state rural school supervisor Miss Parker a republican is from Lake Mills Electrical Engineers Convene on Atom Age New York en gineers from all over the nation gathered in New York Monday to hear a report on their achieve ments and discoveries during the war years and to discuss the pos sibilities ol the coming atomic age More than 1800 delegates ar rived to participate in the 5day session of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers covering 28 technical symposiums confer ences and general meetings Add Safety Measures Washington Additional safety precautions at the No 6 mine of the East Madrid Cooper ative Coal company Madrid Iowa and the new Sterling No 3 mine of he Sunshine Coal com pany Ceaterville Iowa have been recommended by the bureau of mines after recent inspections makjctnuiis The bureau commended several YEAR AGO oeuveeninspection improvements Maximum at the 2 mines i Minimum Plan Group in UNO for Atom Control London of a spe cial commission to devise controls for atomic energy was approved by the political and security com mittee of the united nations as sembly Monday after only 30 min ute discussion The action was taken after Sen ator Tom Connally D of the American delegation saidthe commission will not have power to make any country give up any atomic secrets or take any other action The commission will be able only to make recommenda tions he explained Fortyisix votes were cast lor commission Chairmar Dmitri Maniulsfcy the Ukraine delegation said that the action was unanimous However the delegate Sees Negotiations London Iranian dele to the united nations as sembly Nasrullah Entezam said in an Interview Monday that the res ignation of Iranian Premier Ha kirat may mean the institution ot direct negotiations with Russia to settle Irans dispute with the soviet union The Iranians have protested alleged Russian Inter ference in Irans Internal affairs from the Philippines Tomas Ca bili abstained after he had pro tested against what he called an effort to railroad the resolution through the committee Andrei Gromyko soviet dele gate Ernest Bevin British foreign secretary and Connally urged the committee to act immediately and Bevin repeatedly arose to de mand an approving vote Just before the vote Zygmunt Modzielewski of Poland said there must be solemn and concrete as surances that atomic energy would never be used for destruction but on the contrary would be used al ways for peaceful development of the worlds economy and raising the standard of human lives Under normal procedure the question will go to the full as sembly for final action after the security committee makes a rec ommendation Weather Report FORECAST Mason City Fair and continued cold Monday night with lowest temperatures 510 below Tues day fair with rising tempera tures Iowa Fair and moderately cold Monday night Tuesday fair with rising temperatures aiinnesota Fair Monday night not quite so cold northwest and north central portions Tuesday increasing cloudiness and warm er IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather slatis lics for 24 hour period ending at 8 oclock Monday morning Maximum 24 Minimum 4 At 8 a m Monday 4 YEAR AGO Maximum 28 Minimum 23 GlobeGazette weather statistics for 24 hour period ending at 8 oclock Sunday morning Maximum Saturday 21 Minimum Saturday night 18 At 8 a m Sunday 20 28 23 H Points of Truman Program Washington Truman asked congress Monday to act on a revised 21topic legislative program all of which he had recommended on various dates since last September In addition he recommended these additional measures of the price controlact for 1 year from next June 30 of the 2nd war powers act including niinritv inrf inventory controls beyond June so presumably anoflief 8PmSths food subsidies beyond June 30 with th proviso they stop if the cost of living declines below present levels creating a permanent housing agency u356 S6 camPaiS volunteers does tSsPbeforUeCeAprif caed Here are the 21 measures air Truman listed by numbers disputes boards greater powers in labor employment bill such as that passed by senate unemployment insurance benefits permanent fair employmentpractice committee the statutory minimum wage from 40 to 65 cents an hour now to 70 cents after 1 year and to 75 cents alter 2 years scientific research agency health and prepaid medical care program military training federal salaries succession legislation of the armed services aw to cover domestic use and control of atomic energy of federal control over the U S employment svice at least until June 30 1947 emyiuymeni unemployment allowances for veterans coverage for velerans lor their erm Qf 16 Extension of crop insurance eharter loans to nations of the GreaTLakesSt Lawrence seaway 18 Stockpiling of strategic materials Federal airport legislation French Communists Propose Red Leader for Government Want Formation of CommunistSocialist French Government Paris UP The communists proposed to the socialists Monday tho formation of a communistso cialist government headed by a communist to succeed Gen De Gaulle who resigned Sunday as presidentoirtiieiEreisch provision al government The communists largest party in the constituent assembly pro posed for president the 45year old former coal miner Maurice Thorez minister of slate in tile De Gaulie cabinet and secretary general of the French communist party for 15 years Thorez who fled to Russia at the start of the war to escape the Daladier governments antired drive vjas charged with desertion from the army but was pardoned by De Gaulle and allowed to re turn to France in 1944 The proposal was contained in a letter by Communist Leader Jacques puclos who said the third large party in the assembly the popular republicans had refused to participate in a communistled government Although the communists staked their hope for direct political con trol on Thorez the latter left open the door for a socialist perhaps Minister of State Vincent declaring his own can didacy was not irrevocable Communists and socialists ap parently were closer than at any time since last summer when the socialists rejected a fushion of their 2 parties De Gaulle stepped down from the presidency with an announce ment that he considered he had country toward liberation victory and sovereignty In a letter of resignation act dressed to Felix Gouin president of the constituent assembly he said If I agreed to remain at this government post after Nov 13 1945 it was to respond to the unanimity with which the na tional constituent assembly ad dressed itself to me to make care of a necessary transition Today that transition has been effected Besides France after great trials no longer is in an alarming sit uation Party leaders met in a special conference and were expected to call the assembly into session either later Monday or Tuesday De Gaulle cancelled a radio talk to the nation that he had scheduled for Monday night and reportedly left Paris presumably for seclusion in the country while he waited for the constituent as sembly to act on his resignation AT RED CROSS MEETING MONDAY Lynch club work supervisor for the American Red Cross m India for 3 years and Capt Hank Hook of the 82nd air borne division which served in the European theater will be on the program at the annual meeting of the Cerro Gordo county chapter of the Red Gross at the Music hall Monday evening at 8 Hook as master of ceremonies will interview Shss Lynch as well as Red Cross officials on the work of the organization Certificates will be awarded for outstanding Red Cross services during the war Election ol oltjcers will take place and plans announced for the March campaign for funds Lock photo K A WARNS AGAINST INFLATION AND MAJOR STRIKES Tells Congress Plan to Promote Low Cost Goods With Higher Pay Washington Tru man asked congress Monday to get behind a sweeping program he said will promote greater out put of lower cost goods by higher paid workers And he cautioned thai voices of disunity which are beginning to cry aloud again must not prevail In a 25000 word document combining for the first time both lawmaking and budget recom mendations the chief executive mixed expressions of optimism over business and job potentiali ties with fresh warnings against inflation and concern over ma jor strikes In his budget Mr Truman pegged government expenditures during the fiscal year beginning next July 1 at only above antici pated income And by drawing on the treas urys cash balance he said the na tional debt actually can be re duced for he first time in 17 an expected 000000000 next July to 000000 a year later He added however that he can recommend no further tax cuts at this time In the state of the union por tion of his message Mr Truman termed establishment of a fair wage structure the most serious difficulty in the path of recon version and expansion adding The ability of labor and man agement to work together and the wage and price policies which they develop are social and eco He said labor and management must estabtish better Human lationships pparently mindful of his recent fruitless ef forts to avert the nationwide steel No government policy can make men understand each other agree anil get along unless they conduct themselves in a way to foster mutual respect and good will The government can however help to develop machinery which with the backing of public opin ion will assist labor and manage ment to resolve their disagree ments in a peaceful manner and reduce the number and duration of strikes Mr Truman said most industries and most companies have ade quate leeway within which to grant substantial wage increases The president renewed requests for action by congress on 21 pieces of legislation including measures to raise minimum wages to ex tend price and rent controls a full year beyond June 30 and to ex tend priority and inventory con trols of the second war powers act beyond its June 30 expiration date He also asked again for legisla tion to provide ceiling prices for old and new houses universal military training and merger the armed services and said food subsidies should be continued As in his January 3 radio appeal to the people in which he asked them to get behind congress for action instead of words on meas ures he deems essential the pres ident said his list Monday A very these recommendations have been enacted info law by tne congress Most of them have not I urge upon the congress early consider ation of them Some are more im portant than others but all are necessary Terming inflation still our chief worry Mr Truman said that be cause of its dangerously power ful pressures and because future governmental costs call for large revenues he cannot recommend any further tax reduction now In urging further extension of price controls he said the cost of living index rose only three per cent since the Roosevelt holdthe line order of May 1943 because price controls were vigorously ad ministered But he said since September ISla when he last addressed con gress the strength of inflationary pressures has been demonstrated Retail sales jumped in the clos ing months of 1W45 over previous peaks m 1944 and prices through out the entire economy have been pressing hard against ceilings The prices of real estate which cannot now be controlled under the law are rising rapid The inflationary pressures on prices and rents with relatively few exceptions Mr Truman as sented are now at an alltime peak Unless the price control act is renewed there will be no limit to which our price levels would   

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