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Mason City Globe Gazette: Wednesday, January 16, 1946 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - January 16, 1946, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME OF AND AflCKlVtl THE NEWSPAPER THAT Associated Prtsi and United Press Full Leased DECKER Five Cents a Copy MASON CITY IOWA WEDNESDAY MAKES ALL NORTH 10WANS NEIGHBORS PICKETS FORM AS US FACES MEATLESS DIET Union Leaders Agree to Hold Conference With Schwellenbach Chicago IP A nationwide packinghouse workers strike in volving 268000 workers and threatening a meatless diet for the nation began Wednesday but union leaders Thursday in agreed to confer Washington with Secretary of Labor Schwellenbach in government efforts to halt the Lewis J Clark president of the CIO United Packinghouse Work ers union said he and the unions general counsel Ralph Helstein would go to Washington Clarks spokesman however said the strike was in full force with all its 193000 members out in 140 plants across the nation Previously Earl W Jiraerson president and Patrick E Gorman secretary of the AFL Amalga mated Meat Cutlers and Butcher workmen proposed to the CIO that both unions heed the last minute plea by Schwellenbach and postpone continuation of the strike The AFL pointed out however that Schwellenbachs appeal Tues day night came too late to avert the strike which had been called for midnight and began promptly in some instances even before the deadline There was no immediate esti mate from the AFL as to how inany of its actually were but but 75000 were In volved 45000 Wednesday and 30 000 more later Another 6000 members in the retail trad were not directly involved Spokesman for major packing companies made these estimates Wednesday of the number out on strike nationally Armour company 35000 Cudahy 1000 Wilson and company 9400 Swif and company 15000 to 18800 The CIO spokesman said struck plants included those of Armour Cudahy Swift Wilson and smaller concerns Morrell Kingan and company Cudahy brothers Rath Packing and Tobin Packing companies An early indication of the ef fects of the strike was the report from 12 leading midwest livestock markets that hog receipts Wed nesday totalled only 17700 com pared with 118849 in the same markets a week ago Livestock producers for days had been sharply curtailing their shipments to market in the face of the approachingstrike Picket lines formed during the early morning hours Violence was reported at Swift and companys Kansas City Kans plant where although an independent union was not on strike the general manager E W Phelps saidhe was hauled out of his car by 25 or 30 other strikers beaten ami forced to get a permit to enter his plant Seven hundred pickets from CIO unions at other plants block ed 3 entrances to the Swift plant Phelps said Tbere were pickets also at the Cudahy Wilson and Armour plants in Kansas City Kans The strike call with its mid night deadline affected 193 000 CIO workers and 75000 AFL em ployes which would make it one of the biggest strikes since before the war Around the Chicago stockyards worlds largest livestock market employing some 35000 union members CIO officials said about 2000 pickets were marching Pickets permitted small trucks with loads marked hospitals and similar institutions to proceed The CIO handlers also were per mitted entry to care for live an imals on hand and maintenance men to operate refrigeration equipment to prevent spoilage of meat already dressed and stored There was no indication immed iately of the strikes effect on the countrys meat markets But in dustry spokesmen said if the coun trys consumers have to rely on civilian stocks of meat now in storage as the sole sources of sup Piy the quantity would be ix hausted in about a week The huge strike stemmed from a wage dispute between the CIO UPW and the packers and followed more than 2 months of negotia tions The union demanded a 25 cents an hour wage increase and after the companies had rejected the proposal strike votes were authorized The major companies termed the requested increases unwarranted and unreasonable Later the AFL said its 135000 Truman Asks Agreement in Steel Dispute BULLETIN Washington Tru man Wednesday appealed to CIO President Philip Murray and Ben jamin F Falrless president of th Steel Corp to reach a ment in their wage dispute By UNITED PRESS The longthreatened walkout o meat workers joined CIO electri cal and automobile workers in mass work stoppages in supper of demands for higher wage Wednesday and unless govern ment mediation is successful steel the basic industry will be strike paralyzed by next Monday In the major labor develon ments 1 Labor Secretary Lewis B Schwellenbach telegraphed pack ing union officials to call off thei strike and meet with him in Wash mgton Thursday to continue ne gotiations The unions had not ye responded 2 CIO President Philip Murras will hear the steel industrys repl to his demand for a cen hourly pay increase In a crucia meeting Wednesday at the whit house 3 Operations were suspended In 78 plants of General Electric Westinghouse and General Mo tors electrical division by a strike of 200000 CIO electrical workers 4 The Ford Motor Co offered t raise wages 17y2 cents an hour only 2 cents short of the cen increase recommended for striking General Motors workers and fo which the union said it woulc campaign throughout the industry 5 The senates education and la bor committee agreed to speed hearings on labor legislation in re sponse to growing demands fo strike remedies Wednesdays conference be tween CIO President Murray and Benjamin Fairless head of the U S Steel Corp was arranged las Saturday when Murray agreed to postpone for one week a strike o 800000 steel workers The new deadline expires at midnight nex Monday Union officials came down and the company went up 5 cents on their original proposals after President Truman called them to the white house last week The president expressed hope at that time that an agreemenl would be reached and reiterated his hopes for a settlement at a news conference late Tuesday Mr Truman also told reporters that he still hoped General Motors would accept a factfinding boards recommendation of wage increases of 19V2 cents an hour The proposal was accepted by representatives of 175000 striking GM employes but rejected by the auto firm The 56day GM strike would be settled now the president added if congress had given him the fact finding legislation he asked for Little hope was held for immed iate settlement of the electrical walkout which union leaders said was 100 per cent effective Sole attempt to mediate the dispute was a scheduled series of meetings be tween company union and gov ernment labor officials in Pitts burgh OUR WANT SON STRIKE Town Finally Gets Rid of 3 Cell Jail Wintbrop Harbor HI Winthrop Harbor after 3 years of trying finally got rid of its 3 cell ail In 1943 when the village of about 800 tried to sell or give its ail away there were no bidders or takers for the 30yearold building which hadnt had an oc cupant in years Farmer Elmer Knowles offer of S20 for the jail was accepted with alacrity Tuesday night 1500 pounds of iron bars and doors dismantled with an acetylene torch were his Idle 268000 Workers v 1000 Walk Out at Mason City Plant Approximately 1000 members of local 38 of the packing house workers organizing committee CIO at Jacob E a atJonwide strike Was MAIN ENTRANCE BLOCKEDPicketers were formed solidly across the street at the main entrance to JacobE Decker and Sons Wednesday No attempt to run the picket line was rpnnvrprt aml unuiHnr jx run tin jmejivas reported and the picketera were smiling See Signs of Congressmen Action Soon Washington strikes Wednesday were driving congress toward legislation to maintain industrial order and production There were indications in both house and senate of an informal Feb 1 deadline by which time many legislators will demand an opportunity to vote on strike remedies of some kind Tuesdays midnight walkout ot packinghouse workers further agitated the capital If the steel workers strike next Monday as scheduled the uproar on capitol hill will be terrific President Truman is standing pat for his tactfinding proposal to open cor poration books to government wage fixers and to enforce a 30 day prestrike cooling off period Standing affable and smiling in s close fitting gray suit at Tues days news conference the presi dent said the General Motors strike would have been settled now if congress had given him the actfinding act when he asked or it He wanted congress to en act that legislation before it be gan the 23 day Christmas recess which ended this week In response to other questions he president said something that will jar union leaders He said he bought the senate should be per mitted to vote on the Hobbs bill vhich already had passed the louse The Hobbs bill would apply antiracketeering penalties to la bor unions It would forbid such practices as that upheld by the upreme court by which non union drivers of produce trucks nterhifr some large cities are ompelled to pay a fee to the pre in order to deliver heir loads Unions have blasted t ihe Hobbs bill in great bitter less Although the pressure for con ressional action is increasing lourly everyone in Washington mows that congress and the pa tent really are Waiting to see if he big steel strike is coming off f steel is struck the showdown in ouse and senate will come soon Chairman James E Murray D Ipnt the senatelabor com mttee changed his tune Tuesday nder pressure of colleagues who ntimated he was deliberately de in f 6 company spokesman in formed livestock producers that no shipments would be received Lock photo K and A erigr Clarence Ramsey chairman ported the strike 100 per ceni t jt Major Plants Hit by Packing Strike Chicago plants of the big 4 packers affected by the meat strike include SWIFT CO29 of 45 plants Chicago South Omaha NebrSt TVTiTiTi f by the pickefcrs inn Denver Sioux yi Paul City and Marshalttown Iowa Jersey City Newark and Har rison N J Atlanta and Moul tne Ga Evansville Ind Los An geles San Francisco Sommerville and Springfield Mass New Hav en Conn Philadelphia and Har nsburg pa St Ore Watertown S Portland Dak Mont jwnery Ala NashvilleKansas City Kans St Joseph Mo and Fort Worth and Dallas Tex A1UIOUR CO 32 plants Chicago San Francisco Los in geles Spokane Wash Milwaukee and Green Bay Wis Huron S Dak Fargo and Grand Forks N Dak Peoria and East St Louis 111 Columbus Ohio Pittsburgh pd Reading paMemphis and Lexington Tonn Portland Ore St Pau1 Minn Omaha Oklahoma City Kansas City Kans Denver Birmingham Ala Sioux City and Mason City Iowa Indianapolis Fort Worth Tex St Joseph Mo Jersey City w j New York Atlanta and Tifton of 8 plants New York Los Angeles Chicago Memphis Tenn Kansas City Omaha Cedar Rapicts Iowa olumbus CUDAHYII and Albert Lea of 12 plants Omaha St Paul Minn Wichita and Kansas City Kans Denver Salt Lake City Los Angeles and Cal and Albany Ga Other affected companies IncIT home offices include and aying action on ill the factfinding 7000 STRIKE AT OMAHA NEBR AFL Meat Cutters Not In Walkout Omaha partici pation in the nationwide Pack inghouse Workers strike was be gun without incident at 1201 a m Wednesday as 7000 of the 10 000 left UPWACIO workers their jobs and picket were formed at 5 major packing houses In a statement issued signatures of Patrick over the Strike Picture At a Glance Secretaryof Labd Urges union leaders asked for postpone By circling in flocks small birds can outwit hawks just as lombers staying in formation lutwit attackers members would join the walkout Conferences between union and management with federal concili ators failed to effect a settlement The companies had offered in reases of 7 cents an hour but he union held out for 17 cents o bargain on the remainder Agreements were reached by the unions with some independent ompaniesproviding for 15 cents n hour wage boosts while the IO union president Lewis J Clark said George A Hormel and ompany Austin Minn employ ng 2000 had reached an agree ment with the union calling for vage increases of 17 ij cents an lour Weather Report FORECAST w crFar and warmer Wednesday night with low 13 20 Thursday fair and mild Minnesota Generally fair Wed nesday night and Thursday minimum temperatures some what higher than Tuesday night Iowa Pair and warmer Wednes day night Thursday fair and mild IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics for 24 hour period ending at 8 ocock Wednesday morning Maximum Minimum At 8 a m Wednesday YEAR AGO Maximum Minimum 24 3 J3 23 5 UPWACIO inlernational repre sentative Regional CIO Director Frank Cronin and John Cassidy international representative of the CIO Transport Workers the union pledged itself to carry out the strike in an orderly lawabiding manner Ratigan said 1000 pickets were put on duty at the Wilson Ar mour Swift Cudahy and Kin gan plants and between 7 000 8000 pickets are held in reserve The pickets will work in fourhour shifts he said Hatigan said no one will be al lowed to cross the picket lines without permission of the union but that maintenance men will be permitted to keep meat from spoiling Only CIO affiliated workers were affected by the strike in Omaha Joe Silhasek secretary of the Omaha local of the Amalga mated Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen AFL said his group would not strike against any firms in Omaha or throughout Nebras ka Cronin said Omaha is the only point in the state affected by the BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Schwellenbach on President e Morrell Packing Co Ottuimva Iowa Rath Packing Co Indian Tobin Packing company Fort Dodge Iowa and Cudahy Brothers Milwaukee bors of the powerhouse crew were allowed to maintain boiiers refrigeration equipment and other machinery which must be kept in condition They are the only CIO members in the plant he declared Ramseywas notified of the im pending walkout just before mid mght and the workers began eavmg immediately afterward leaving a cleanup crew to finish up work left by the night crew A company spokesman who said the plant was shut down tight warned that no livestock will be received Members of the local strategy board in addition to Chairman Hamsey are Leamen Forshee Bob Holt Art Costello Floyd Matson n Carrott Forrest Abbott Woodrow Green Ed Kunz Ed Kolda and Ed Newman Picketing was quiet and orderly the local plant Police were hand to maintain order if necessary All cars approaching the plant were stopped and either turned back with an explanation or strike passes issued to the oc at The local union members others nation NO STOPPAGE AT AUSTIN PLANT CIO strike Company union agreements ers in Minnesota and North Da kota struck Wednesday in the na tionwide walkout called by CIO and AFL unions to enforce a de mand for a 25 cents per hour increase Plants In ihat area ivilh he approximate number of union members walking out were Swift and company 4000 Armour ind joined more than 300 000 m the strike across the wulm against the 4 major meat packinc companies foretold Cws tor ioia ot the impending walk out at p m Tuesday shortly before KGLO went off the air The strike was felt immediately in 10 Iowa cities where strikes nffectin2 an estimated 18000 to 20000 workers Members of both the AFL meat cutters and butcher workers union and the CIO united pack inghouse workers of America union were involved in the Iowa walkouts At Cedar Rapids UPW members established picket lines more than 2 hours ahead of the national deadline of Wednesday morning Some 1500 employes of Wilson and company started their strike at Picket lines were thrown around the Armour Cudahy and Swift Company plants at Sioux City early m the morning An es timated 2755 workers were re ported out at the 3 plants there A union spokesman reported that workers at the Bookey Pack ing company plant in Des Moines would remain on the job Wednes day to supply hospitals and the armed forces Employes the plant members of the UPW union originally voted to strike he re ported Paul union stockyards Packing 250 200 Superior Barlusch Packing company 1500 Cudahy 1200 oouth St company i company m wage negotiations company M and Rttfti Met Ur mcreaEc as I company 50 Jf cents rejected nrbrCafcGinrtrai SIKT UPW k deadlock between union and GenS Motors mM Cd Pachin2house Work ers I Persons ttere involved in ule i at Austin Wednesday issued a I slrkc at Worrells Otlumwa nlant statement raying under no ciri Picket plant Af ler Presdeot of local 46 UPWA said at Waterloo that between 4200 and 4300 work Forty workers were reported out at the Arnold Brothers Swift subsidiary pjant at Perry Strikers at the Iowa Packing Co Des Momes huddled about 3 or 4 bonfires to keep warm along the picket lines President of the UPW local No 1 CIO said 3 200 involved were announced Tuesday which permit 3 unionaffiliated plants here to continue operation des pite the strike Hatigan and officials the Glaser Packing company said they had agreed to a new contract which would adjust wages in con formity to the strike setlement no matter what the outcome At 2 other Nebraska Beef company and the South Omaha Packing workers were told to continue pro cessing livestock for the army veterans hospitals local hospitals and other institutions needing meat for health purposes Des Moines Responds DCS Jlolnes Drake university made its appeal for rooms for former servicemen and women returning to school the first of this week about 130 of fers have been received at the school Dean George S Berry said Tuesday ARMED CLASHES IN NORTH CHINA tn j lines were ostfihliiliprf Cumstanccs was there to be any Ihere shortly after midnight Of work stoppage at the George A fico employes and maintenance Hormel Packing company without workers were allowed to specific instructions from the exei through the lines cutive board of local No 9 I At Fort Dodge production in The union denied Hat there the Tobin companys plan stepped ZM S JLhc of TuesdaysTork find over armed clashes in north China in Tuesday morning violation ot the recently reached ll vas the government communist truce that fiuvuijimcnt communist truce were reported Wednesday to the o political consultation conference i wagc mcreisc wcr The reports were hv cnces to an arra clay Fred J ClVrkT and manager said j Clark said between 575 and 600 companys under1 employes were affected bv the the current news j walkout Only unit in operation 1 J2 cents an hour j Wednesday was the engine room re actually refer to provide heat and u uue Luimniuee wmcn last week fmu invoivm formally arrived at a peace pact i aded 10 per cent to lhe Chou Enlai communist repre work ioad 7 a wech sentative on the commit added to the basic weekly are wor ried by reports continued light in b ing Holland exported nearly S10 000000 worth of flower bulbs during 1945 In the west Fargo N Dak area a area about 1000 workers affected at the West Fargo union stock yards company and the Armour plant In addition nearly 900 workers the Wilson Packing corn Albert Lea and 150 others in the Wilson plant at Faribault At Duluth members of the Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butchers union AFL announced they would not participate in the t   

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