Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Mason City Globe Gazette: Friday, January 11, 1946 - Page 1

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - January 11, 1946, Mason City, Iowa                                NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME DEPARTMENT CF Associated Press ana United Press Full Leased THE NEWSPAPER THAT Kive Cents a Copyj MASON CITy IOWA FRIDAY JANUARY 11 MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS w e library Hill toI4 a reporter he the army chief of staff to supply a imr i uie army cruel or staff to supply figures on the number of soldiers released since VJ day and to an swer questions about the demobilization program Meanwhile the army directe a reduction from 1 to 13 weeks in the time for training of soldiers as replacements for overseas vet erans The war department made th announcement without comment but officials noted that the cut ir training time would make me available for service 4 week earlier Eisenhower now on an officia visit to Canada is not due bac at his Pentagon office until th first of next week Fresh evidence of war depart ment apprehension over the de mobilization furor was reflectec meanwhile in a speech by unde M 81 STRIKE CRIPPLES NATION Continues to FunctionNormally WORKERS BEGIN PICKETBARRIER IN LARGE CITIES Secretary Royall Thursday nigh at Roauoke Va Royall who is heading the de partment while Secretary Patter son is on a Pacific inspection tour deplored American hysteria tc get boys home This he said is endangering our whole occu pation policy The ending of this hysteria i the responsibility of the people o America he declared not of the army not of the navy not of the president not of congress Should the rapid withdrawal o overseas personnel continue Royall went on America will lose its power to prevent the totali tarian elements in Germany and Japan from building again for an other conquest dempbilizatloi problem constitutes the first ho potato tossed into Eisenhowers hands since he succeeded Gen George C Marshall 2 months ago as chief of staff Although the question mani festly was too complex for a single aflswer to pleas everyone the GI and congressional view seemed to be that the former su preme commander could be counted on to clarify things The Frankfurt demonstrators after booing the names of both McNarney and Secretary Patter son heard one GI speaker pro claim hat we are going to con tinue to hold our meetings until we make ourselves heard by af fable Ike The congressional talk of hear ing Eisenhowers opinions in dicated that a joint meeting would like to listen to him next Tuesday in the library of congress if pres ent plans develop Otherwise the chief of staff probably will be invited to testify before senate or house military committees or both I would favor something of that kind and I know other mem bers would like it said Senator Johnson DColo Johnson is chairman of the sen ate military subcommittee al ready assigned to inquire into army demobilization There were reports that the war department deeply concerned lest the G I demonstrations spread to more serious proportions wants its story told by Eisenhower Execute Traitor London Moscow radio reported Friday that Dr Laszlo de Bardossy wartime premier of Hungary was executed Thursday at Budapest as a war criminal Weather Report FORECAST Bfason City Decidedly colder Friday night and Saturday low est Friday night 5 Mostly cloudy Friday night becoming partly cloudy Saturday Strong northwest winds beginning Fri day evening Iowa Mostly cloudy Friday through Saturday with snow flumes Friday night Decidedly colder Friday night and Satur day and in northwest Friday afternoon Minnesota Decidedly colder Fri day night and Saturday Most ly cloudy with occasional snow flurries Strong northerly winds diminishing Saturday IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statis tics for 24 hour period ending at 8 oclock Friday morning Maximum 40 Minimum 23 At 8 a m Friday 26 YEAR AGO Maximum 22 Minimum 15 Clamp Down U S Marines in Pacific Honolulu States marines in the Pacific theater were under orders Friday of their com manding general not to stage mass demonstrations such as other serv ice groups have held in Korea Japan Hawaii Guam and the Philippines to protest the current demobilization program The order of Lt Gen Roy S Geiger issued Thursday to com pany commanders cancelled a marine meeting scheduled Thurs day night at Camp Catlin adjacent to Pearl Harbor Its traditional with the ma rines explained Geigers chief of staff Brig Gen Mervin H Silver thorn that men go to their com manders with their troubles whether they are family affairs a bellyache or anything else and we dont feel there is any occa sion for meetings which are not a military formation that can be controlled Silverthorn said the orders ap plied not only to a meeting Thurs day night but also to those at any other time Meanwhile Lt Gen Hobert C Richardson Jr commander of army forces in the midPacific expressed gratification over the orderly manner in which soldiers ofhis command have held meet ings in protest against the demob ilization policies I am happy to say their ac tions reflect great credit upon my noncommissioned officers whom I addressed Tuesday afternoon be fore any of these meetings were held he said At that time Richardson told the men that any expressions of opinion formally ratified at or derly meetings would be trans mitted to General Eisenhower and General MacArthur The Honolulu edition oE the a r m y newspaper Stars and btnpes which has carried out spoken comment on the current demobilization developments re opened its columns Friday to sol dierwritten articles after a 1 day nterruption prompted by its in terpretation of a Richardson or der Richardsons directive was in tially taken to mean that the paper could not criticize army policies The general in a directive had cautioned the newspaper against carrying derogatory remarks or references about the secretary of war and others in army authority as individuals Fact Board Urges Wage Raise in GM Washington if Union and company representatives studied a proposal to end the 51 day old General Motors strike with a 17 2 per cent pay increase They made no immediate com mitment but one white house la bor adviser said it was significant neither side rejected the terms during preliminary discussions with aides of President Truman These talks occurred soon after the recommendation was taken to the chief executive by his fact fiuaing panel Thursday Officials of the United Auto mobile Workers will consider the proposal Sunday at a meeting in Detroit Walter P Reuther U4AV vice president declared the board supports the unions position that wages can and must be increased without price in crease The corporation had nothing to say until experts could study the 30page report of the factfinders The men who counsel Mr Tru man on labor problems seemed hopeful the end of the GM tieup was m sight and that this would influence solution1 of steel meat packing and electrical industrv disputes which have brought calfs for 1100000 CIO workers to strike next week The recommended pay increase would amount to cents an hour more than the present av erage scale of S113 an hour The tlAW asked a 30 per cent rise or 336 cents more an hour and the company had offered 12 per cent or cents The ClOauto workers origin ally made their demand for a 30 per cent pay increase to offset loss in takehomepay resulting when plants cut from 48 to 40 hours a week at the wars end The panel in addition to rec ommending a hourly in crease called for immediate end of the strike reinstatement of strikers without discrimination and restoration of the 1945 con tract The board commented that the company had a right to cancel that contract on December 10 as it did Saying it was satisfied that the recommended wage increase would not have inflationary conse quences the panel added in a footnote In satisfying ourselves that in our judgment the company can Pay in the first 12 mouths after the resumption of production the recommended wage increase with out increasing prices we have as sumed that A General Motors will sell its products at its 1942 schedule of prices B Produc will be no greater than in C Aggregate volume of Look to White House for Meet Strike Intervention Chicago With a government offer of price relief rejected bv i jY ilVLlbt wage dispute involving some workers 200000 CIO United Packinghouse 1941 production will equal that of 1941 D Material costs to General BIo tors have increased 15 per cent since 1941 and may increase more E Total payrolls have increased and will increase proportionately with wage increases and F Sell ing general and administrative osls will lie somewhat higher han iu 1941 ling newsmen there were 2 pos sibilities remaining tor the strike if negotiations break down Certification to the white house for appointment of a fact finding board or government seiz ure of the plants involved in the dispute The seriousness of the situa tion increases Warren said as he left for Kansas City At the mo ment it looks very bad The de partment of labor will continue to work with both parties in an ef fort to avert the strike Warren did not elaborate on the 2 possibilities of averting the walkout scheduled for Jan 15 say ing he would withhold his recom mendations until he had conferred with Secretary of Labor Schwel lenbach The government offer rejected by Swift and Armour Thursday proposed an increase of 50 cents a hundred pounds on all govern ment meat purchases including those for the army navy and for eign relief In rejecting the plan George A Eastwood Armour president de scribed the proposal as wholly inadequate to meet the demands of the union The union is de manding 25 cents or 17i cents above the packers 16 YEAR OLD IS SHOT HUNTING Robert Harriott IB of 8th N W was killed by a 22 rifle shot about p m Friday while he was hunting with a neighbor Merlin Baker 16 of 812 N Fillmore The boys had been hunting rabbits near highway IB west of Mason City Coroner R E Smiley was called to investigate the shooting Sheriff Tim Phalen and police officers also investigated Flying Bill Causes Wild Chase Peoria 111 a gust of wind blew a 510 bill out of Mrs Beatrice Lopezs hand as she emerged from a downtown bank she had lots of helpers seeking to retrieve it Wind currents carried the bill nigh irito the air over several stores back to the street and up into the air again with many shoppers in pursuit Finally the bill floated to the pavement and a motorist leaped tromUiis auto pinned it down and It cv uegnan anc then choppea her body to pieces hunted fresh clues Friday The collapse of one clue after another many of which had been regarded as important brought no letdown in the police investiga tion as a picked squad of offi cers searched for new leads which would trap the hidnapkiller As funeral services for the vic one of Chicagos most ghastly crimes were being held police said they had not uncov ered any new clues definitely Des Moines Davenport Get Pickets Des Moines IP Telephone service in Iowa continued to func tion about normally Friday as members of the Association of Communication Equipment Work ers placed pickets at telephone exchanges in Des Moines and Dav enport No picketing was reported n other Iowa cities and Frank Mar shall Des Moines Iowa Nebras ka South Dakota representative of ACEW said Thurs day night Des Moines and Daven port were the only cities in this state where picketing was planned A large portion of telephone workers reporting for work this morning ignored the picket line and continued into the exchange A spokesman for Northwestern Hell Telephone company said ap proximately 70 per cent of the op erators scheduled for work were on duty He reported also how Service Normal A union spokesman in Mason City said Friday that he had re ceived no word from district or national headquarters and that telephone work was going on as usual Bending receipts of instruc tions to the contrary Police Seek Fresh Clues in Kidnaping Chicago and Cook county law enforcement officials unsuccessful after 4 days of in tensified search to capture the president and general man sadist who kidnaped and killed 6 Ser of Northwestern Bell whfch year old Suzanne Degnan and operates in Minnesota North choppeoher bodv to South JTT ever toll and Jong distance calls were about 30 per cent below nor mal Friday morning and the op erators on duty were able to keep calls on about a normal basis At Davenport some contusion was reported with some operators crossing the picket line At Minneapolis Glen Allen vice president and general man linking any one person suspect toe Two janitors who work in the Edgewater district on t h e north side where the Dqgnan family lives were released from police custody Thursday on writs of ha beas corpus One of the janitors Hector Ver burgh 65 had been in custody for 48 hours for questioning after po lice said the Dcgnan girls body had been hacked to pieces in the basement of an apartment build ing he tended But the states attorneys office told Chief Justice Harold G Ward of the criminal court the state hail no evidence to warrant filing charges against either Verhurgh or Desere Smet 35 who also tends apartment buildings near the Dcgnan home or Vcrhurghs xvife Mary 64 Verburgh as well as Smct had repeatedly denied any connection with he kidnaping and dismem berment of Suzanne the daughter of James E Degnan OPA execu tive Later after their release Mayor Edward J Kelly States Attorney William Tuohy and top police of ficials conferred for several hours Police Commissioner John C Prendergast placed Lt Philip Bnetzke head of the homicide squad m charge of a special de tail of 20 officers They will work exclusively on the case More than a dozen men have been picked up for questioning in connection with the crime Only 3 however were detained and none was regarded by officials as a principal suspect A wake for Suzanne the Deg nans blond blueeyed baby daughter was held Thursday night but only relatives and close friends were allowed to attend The Degnans have another daugh ter Betty 10 Js the demolished legislature building AP V in demobilization UT e K 4 wwu lino an area near P I city hall to in demobilization JVreckage in the background Chicago Judge Refuses Call to Jury Service Chicago ip Superior Judge rank M Padden who has been on the bench in Cook county lor 21 years got a letter from the board of jury commissioners di recting him to fill out a question naire and report for jury duty It would be a joke if I was as signed to a jury in my own court he said But when Judge Padden re torted to the board he explained he couldnt serve as judges are exempt anc South Dakota Nebraska and Iowa said a normal staff was on duty there and he knew of no curtail ment m local or long distance calls in the 5 states The operators not working here were remaining off work of then own volition officials of the Northwestern Union of Telephone Workers local union 1541 said Dorothy Sterns secretary of the operators union local here said that until the local union received word from its general board of fices nt Omaha it was taking no official position in regard to the picket line Marshall said 20 men of he equipment union here were not working Marshall added that 12 union men at Davenport are out 7 at Otfumwa 5 at Sioux City 4 at Waterloo 3 at Mason City zat Muscafine and 1 at Dubuque Meanwhile 10 members of the long lines federation telephone workers who do long distance test room and outside plant main tenance work on long distance tel ephone teletype and radio net Work lines sat in a room across the street from the telephone company and watched the Com munication Equipment Workers picket line They explained that they were not striking but that they had received orders from their New York union headquar ters not to cross the equipment workers picket line 3 AMERICANS DIE IN BLAZE Find Charred Bodies in German House Nuernberg IP The army newspaper Stars and Stripes re ported Friday that the charred bodies of 3 U S military govern ment officers had been found in a halfburned house on the out skirts of Passau near the Austri anBavarian border Soldiers who saw the fire said there were indications beaten to that th and way Names of the officers were not disclosed Sylvia Sidney Files Suit for Divorce Los Angeles Syl via Sidney has filed suit fordi force from Luther Adler systems wil way actor charging he caused her wn ln a week to 10 das Jnevous mental suffering Shortlv Indicating that Adler her 2nd husband would not contest the WIEII tiifjLiru ont asked for custody of their son Jody 6 Government Seizure in Telephone Tieup Seen by Spokesman By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Americas vast long distance telephone system was crippled ser iously by a strike for emergency a labor department spokesman said the government might step in if a na tionwide tieup in telephone serv ice developed In Washington the spokesman who requested that his name not be used said government seizure of the telephone industry migrht be recommended Reports of effectiveness of the picketing on long distance service varied considerably However the American Telephone and Tele graph company reported at noon that a survey at a m showed long distance traffic in and out of New York City was only 5 per cent of normal because the persons on auty were inexperienced and had difficulty routing long distance calls Reversing an earlier decision to wait until Monday installation workers threw picket lines around most of the major exchanges across the nation in the early dawn In most cases other tele phone workers were not crossing those lines Supervisors and telephonecom pany officials were attempting to Power of Nylons Kenark N J 35 telephone operators were clustered near the Washington street central exchange picket lines Friday when another operator approached and with one word scattered the group m a hurry The operator gave complete instructions on where uie girls could purchase nylons maintain service but could care for little more than the most urgent calls In San Francisco 11000 tele phone operators throughout north ern California and Nevada were ordered Friday by their union to leave their jobs immediately re gardless of whether their local tel ephone company offices were pick eted In Cleveland the Ohio Federa tion of Telephone Employes called off their jobs at noon Friday ihere is approximately 7500 members employed by the Ohio Bell Telephone company A T and T said that in New York 4a per cent of its long dis tance boards were covered at 830 a m and other figures at that weLe 71 Per cent delphia 13 Pittsburgh 245 Cleveland 32 Detroit 34 Louis ville 13 Memphis 116 Chicago 18 Kansas City 125 Minneapolis 28 St Louis 93 The company said that by a m 100 additional persons were manning its switchboards in New York bringing the total to 330 about 20 per cent of the 1600 op erators who normally would have been at work Friday morning A T and T the nations lop lonsr distance facility reported 13 of its 14 major traffic offices were Picketed the exception hems Bos Ion Those he company said were Picketed were Cincinnati Buffalo Chicago Cleveland Detroit Kansas City Louisville Memphis Minneapolis New York Philadel phia Pittsburgh and SI Louis The telephone situation followed a strike Wednesday of 8000 mem bers of the Association of Com munications Equipment Workers Ind who install Western Elec tric equipment in Bell Telephone i i an the house set on fire after it was i m otu iciepnone drenched with gasoline the pa exchanges They originally de per said It declared that an army manded a S6 a week nay increase investigation alread was later cut vifc iliUl ITdSe but later cut that to an undis closed amount The union got the pledge of many other telephone union work ers that they would not cross picket Imes In addition to lone distance service Fridays action also curtailed manual operations n many sections Dial telephones were not affected but will be need repairs The union dial systems will bog week to 10 days Shortly before Thursday mid Ernest Weaver president of said picketing would be vuuiu nui contest tne picKeungr would be suit MISS Sidney said a property Postponed until Monday at the settlement had been effected She request of Secretary of Labor asked for custodv few hours said V ahead   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 155+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 155 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication