Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: December 1, 1945 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - December 1, 1945, Mason City, Iowa                                it 1 it f vf J i If f J t NORTH IOWAS DAILY JAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME DSMftTMENT OF AND ARCHIVES VH I A THE NEWSPAPER THAT VOL LU MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS Associated Presa and United Press full leased wires CFive Cents a Copyl PERILOUS F Brown petty officer of Nor folk Va and James P Saunders chief petty officer of San Francisco ciawlcd to safety Friday as their car teetered 40 feet above railroad tracks at Kansas City Both occupants escaped unharmed and the convertible coupe was pulled to safety after it crashed against a viaduct rail AP Wirephoto Packinghouse Workers Vote for Strike If Necessary Members ot the CIO United Packinghouse Workers union in Ma son City followed the trend in other midwest unions Friday and striding if aecessary in support of their demand tor i Of the 999 eligible voters in Siason City 817 voted in favor of the strike with only 10 Nos There were 6 void ballojs making the total 833 votes cast The vote conducted by the national labor relations board was taken at the Jacob E Decker and Sons plant a subsidiary of Armour and company polls open until p m in order that all workers be given a chance to vote The heavy killing season already being under way a shortage of help necessitated overtime hours for those work ing At Sioux City 2255 workers at the Swift Armour and Cudahy plants voted to strike if necessary and 66 opposed the move A total of 270fi employes were eligible to take part in the election Workers at John Morrell and company Ottumwa voted 1744 to 100 in favor of the strike Fourteen ballots were void A to tal ot 2350 workers were elig ible for the election At Wilson and company Cedar Rapids union members voted 1 301 to 44 in favor of a work stoppage to enforce the unions demands Four votes were void Of the 1611 workers eligible to vote a total of 1349 cast ballots At Des Moines employes of Iowa Packing Co a subsidary of Swift voted 841 to 6 in favor of the strike 1 ROY TRAVIS43 KILLED BY AUTO Was Crossing Road With 2 Pails of Milk Clear Travis 43 was instantly killed when a car driven by Bill Tracy 30 who resides 2 miles north of Swaledale struck him in front of the Travis home a milesouth of Clear Lake on the new Thornton road about p a Friday Mr Travis was crossing the road with 2 pails of milk and a lantern when he was struck by the car which was moving north at the time According Jo the driver he did not see Mr Travis until the car was within 20 feet of him Unable to stop he swerved the car to the right side of the road but the back end of it struck Sir Travis The with 7 persons in it went into the ditch but no one in it was in jured Mr Travis had resided at Clear Lake about 2 years For 5 years previously he had resided near Ventura He was born Sept 27 1902 and was married to Miss Cora Fjune Jan 4 1927 Surviving Mr Travis are his wife a daughter Betty Jean 18 a senior in the Ventura high school his mother Mrs Rose Travis Faulkton S Dak 3 sis ters Mrs Althea Smith Prince ton 111 Mrs Gilford Cunningham Cresbard S Dak and Mrs Frank Van Peit Faulkton S Dak and 2 brothers Berwyn Travis recent GM Waits for Move Union Heads By tJNTTED PRESS General Motors Corp official Saturday waited for the United to of Automobile Workers CIO make the next move in the coast tocoast walkout which has shut down 93 plants and kept 225000 GM workers from their jobs Following the first renewal negotiations in the 11dayold strike the company Friday nigh proposed a partial resumption o operations for the benefit of othe automobile manufacturers A union reply was expected mo mentarily The proposal as outbned in letter to UAW President R Thomas from C E Wilson head of the giant General Motors firm provided for the reopening of GK parts and accessories divisions to work exclusively on material for other auto manufacturers Wilsons statement that the GM tieup had cut off the flow of parts to other manufacturers was in line with repeated industry warnings that the strike jf con tinued longeventually would close down the plants of all but one major auto producer MASON crrr IOWA SATURDAY DECEMBER IMIS Tills Paper Consists ot Two One NO EARLY MORNING ICE DISAPPEARS Early morning ice on the streets of Mason City and the highways of North Iowa slowed up traffic but no damage was reported and ice began to break up with rain fall early in the morning Mason City Motor coaches went out early on their runs and were able to keep to schedule The Jef ferson Transportation company reported all buses in for the morn ing run but the bus from the north encountered trouble with ice around Northwood and Albert Lea Minn Roads in Iowa are open for travel according to the Iowa state highway patrol and train service delayed slightly in the early morn ing hours by slippery rails was reported running on schedule 00000 MORE G IS DELEGATES SEE HOPEFUL SIGNS AS GOAL FAILS LaborManagement Conference Fails to Achieve Peace Washington of the national labormanagement con ference admitting their gains had fallen short of their goals Satur daw saw in its completed deliber ations some hopeful signs fir the future Their statements however were overshadowed by speculation whether John L Lewis closing appeal for unity Jn the policies and leadership of the house of labor meant he might return to the AFL The man who split off from AFL to form CIO and then split off from CIO to run his united mine workers as an independent union told the labor delegates they had worked at a disadvantagein the face of the management groups organized efficient functioning while the labor groups quarreled Lewis declared that labors di vision caused a weakening in strength and in policies and a failure sometimes to achieve all the objectives it might hope to at tain And during one conference recess the United Mine Workers leader went into an AFL caucus room The conference became a labor battleground for a time in its final full session Friday AFL and CIO offered rival resolutions calling for genuine collective bargaining and nationwide wage increases Wfcile labor disagreed the man By ANN STRINGER tjnited Press Correspondent Nuernberg Hess parachuted into Britain in 1941 to bring King George VI back to Germany for a peace conference before Adolf Hitler opened his at tack on Hussia the United Press learned exclusively Saturday Hitler knew nothing of his deputy fuehrers scheme until he read a letter Hess left behind it was learned The fuehrer was left speechless then began raging at everyone possibly connected with Hess In a statement Hess said he set out to bring about peace because he could not accept the fact that the 2 greatest peoples on earth were attempting to annihilate each other Hess prepared his flight so se cretly that he didnt even tell his wife he was going Nobody knew of his intentions except his ad jutant and secretaiy both of whom were arrested later Hitler when he recovered con trol of himself told Hermann Goering told inter Farmers Get Blueprint on Production Washington govern ment Saturday handed farmers a blueprint for 1946 production out lining cutbacks from high wartime levels for most food cropslive stock and livestock products Secretary of Agriculture Clinton P Anderson in announcing na tional farm production goals for next year urged farmers to plant 356214000 acres in crops Tliis would be 5500000 acres more than were cultivated this year but boosts in corn and cotton n make up most of the t a agement delegation voted aginst yeai both resolutions and stuck to one make Up most of of its own saying that wage levels nptthficpnferencesbusiness The gbals for poultry milled Iri the end no resol The conference closed its dis agreement on 3 major subjects half its agenda The mendations were on collective I bargaining and observance of con tracts on managements right to manage ami on jurisdictional dis putes Its chief accomplishment in the view of most leaders was agree ment that arbitration or umpire ship instead of strikes and lock outs should be the final word in grievances arising under existing labor contracts This was one of 3 reports agreed on fH fi Trt the end no resolution Vvasf eggseieawy setTorarecojrvereSW adopted not even the portions ehpattern Ior farmers in 1946 They dorsing collective bargaining were asked to produce 2500000 which all had contained pounds less milk 670000000 dozen fewer eggs 17 per cent fewer chickens and 10 per cent fewer turkeys It was urged that cattle herds considered too large for present feed reserves andpotential meat demand be reduced by another 1600000 head by the end of 1946 Only for sugar still the nations worst food shortage was a large increase recommended Producers were asked to increase sugar beet production by 3i per cent and sugar cane output by 8 On the whole however the goals program follows a middle oftheroad policy No drastic reductions were sought n the first postwar jear It was apparent though that in the governments view the recordbreaking food production of wartime years will be undesirable for peacetime de mand Anderson reported that he was seeking continued high produc tion because the wars end has not brought an end to the almost unlimited need lor American food He said that meeting the sug gested goals will give civilians greater supplies of most major commodities than during the war At the same time he added we are not forgetting our allies who now face hunnar because war destroyed or damrfged their nor mal food production He said the departments pro gram recognizes the need for re I storing a better balance between soildepleting and soilconserving crops Increases were urged for the feed grains to rebuild the evernormal granary of prewar years and to feed the large livc I stock and poultry population RUDOLF HESS Hess was mad to try an impossible mission like that Hess parachuted onto the Scot tish estate of the Duke of Ham ilton on 3Iay 10 1941 He flew a niessersclimitt plane from Ger many and later boasted of his superior navigational ability which enabled him to make a pinpoint landing on the dukes estate as he had intended Before taking off Hess wrote a letter to Hitler describing purpose of his flight the Goering said he was called into the fuehrers office Hitler got the letter as soon as When I found him he was sit ting at his desk holding Hess let ter in his hand He was not mov ing After several minutes the fuehrer limply handed the letter to me to read He was speechless Goering said Then he became furious He started raging and called in everyone could possibly have known anything about it Goering said he and Joachim von Ribbentrop nazi foreign min ister agreed with Hitler that Hess was crazy Hess also wrote a letter to the Duke of Hamilton in German Ernest Bohle then under secre tary of the German foreign of fice translated it into English for him Bohle explained later that he did so without any thought that Hess would try to deliver it in person He believed Hess would try to meet the duke in some neutral country Hess said ho chose the duke as the man to see first because he knew the duke and believed he could lead him directly to King George The day before the flight Hess had luncheon with several high ranking nazi friends including Alfred Rosenberg at his home He spent most of the day playing with his young son then went secretly to the airfield When Hess landed in Scotland he was immediately taken pris oner by a farmer with a pitch fork He was held as a prisoner of war in Britain under close guard until he was brouglit to Nuernberg He never lias been permitted to make a public statement about his flight Attempted to Bring Back British King for Parley MMM N STRINGER HillI I MEDICAL CORPS POINT SCORES MASON CITYANS LAND IN STATES Pfc Mingo A Torres1 Mason City was scheduled to arrive in Newport News Va aboard the Schmelzer due to dock there Sat usday it was reported in an AP dispatch received here Three Mason Cityans arrived in New York Friday on the E B Alexander the dispatch stated They were Michael H Cross Cpl T E Sol and Pfc James N Van Sickie ly released from service and Del ton Travis in the service Funeral arrangements are in complete The body was taken to Wards funeral home at Clear Lake The sheriffs office is investigat ing the accident Postmaster Washington president has sent to the senate the nomina tion of Robert N Culbertson for the postmitttership of Blairsburg Iowa and Hans A Tvedte for the postmastership of Dolliver Iowa Latest College FOOTBALL RESULTS Army Navy Yale Harvard Notre Damefg Great Lakes Final SCHOOL BUS WRECK EVIDENCESearcher seeking the submerged bus which toppled Into a lake after hitting a lakeside road boulder near Chelan Wash recovers a school book floatingon the lake surface AP Wirephoto V f FIND SCHOOL BUS in i to Make Up Fire Loss IN LAKE GHELAN Chelan Wash school bus which carried the driver and 15 students to their deaths in Lake Chelan last Monday was found by a navy diver in 200 feet of water 250 feet off shore Sat urday The diver C E Meyers of New York City reported the bus was resting upside down Meyers did not determine im mediately how many bodies re mained in the machine THE WORLDS BEST BUY Victory Loan Bonds Buy yours this week Bring the boys home and fight inflation Weather Report FORECAST Mason City Rain Saturday night Lowest temperature near freez ing Sunday cloudy and some what cooler Iowa Mostly cloudy Saturday and Saturday night and Sunday Showers and occasional thun derstorms in west and central portions Saturday and Saturday night Occasional rain in ex treme east Saturday night and Sunday Colder west Sunday Minnesota Rain south and light freezing rain or drizzle north portion Saturday afternoon and Saturday night with rain changing to snovv north and snow flurries southwest portion late Saturday night or early Sunday Snow north and snow flurries south portion Sunday Colder Sunday afternoon IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistic1 for 24 hour ieriod ending at 8 oclock Saturday morning Maximum 32 Minimum 29 At 8 a m Saturday 32 Precipitation 10 YEAR AGO Maximum 33 Minimum Minus 2 Chicago UR Santa Claus bustled around his work shop faster than ever Saturday He was working to make up the loss of several thousand dollars worth of Christmas toys destroyed by fire Friday night at the Four Star Manufacturing company Rule Hess to Continue War Trial Nuernberg interna tional military tribunal ruled Sat urday that Hudolf Hess who con fessed he had Seen faking am nesia must continue to stand trial with 19 other nazi leaders ac cused of war crimes Lord Justice Sir Geoffrey Law rence presiding announced that no furthef mental examinations of Hitlers former deputy were nec essary and that he was capable of standing trial Hess who had read novels and paid scant attention to early por tions of the trial created a sen sation Friday when he told the court he had simulated loss oi for reasonsanc announced he would stand respon sible for all of his actions The blackbrowed Hess ap peared mupb relieved by hs con fession and for the first time since the trial began engaged in lively conversation with other prisoners in the box just before the session opened Defense counsel got their first chance at crossexamination when the court recalled Maj Gen Er win Lahousen leading Germai army intelligence officer whosi testimony Fridayplaced the blam for mass murder of Polish and Russian prisoners directly on Hit ler and the high commands chief of staff Field Marshal Wilhelm Keitel one of the score of German leaders on trial Asked if he and other professed antiHitler military leaders knew the attitude of Franz Von Papen former German diplomat and one of the defendants toward the nazi war policies Generai Lahousen replied I recall that Canaris said they were negative He referred to Admiral Wilhelm Canaris Ger man spy expert who was des cribed as leader of a secret anti Hitler military clique until his execution after the unsuccessful 1944 bombplot against the fuhrer 40500 More Veterans Return to Home Sweet Home Shores 54 Ships Dock at East and West Ports With Troops By UNITED PRESS Fiftyfour ships were sched uled to dock Saturday at east and west coast ports with more than 40500 troops DUE AT NEW YORK Sanla Rosa 2446 troops in cluding 236th engineer combat battalion 3276th and 3277th quar termaster platoons and 1500 mis cellaneous NYU 1959 troops in cluding 376th antiaircraft artil lery battalion 519th ordinance HM company 161st chemical com pany 3251st ordinance base depot company 426th truck company Shecpshead Bay Victory 1560 troops including 202nd field ar tillery battalion headquarters and headquarters quartermaster quartermaster pany 971st quartermaster gas service company USS 1189 troops in cluding 49Ist antiaircraft artil lery battalion headquarters de tachment 29th antiaircraft artil lery group 452nd ordinance eva cuation company 3892nd quarter master truck company USS Reno 612 troops includ ing 37th engineer combat bat talion William and Mary Victory 1 489troops including 82nd arm ored field artillery battalion 92nd detachment 80th battalion 3940th gas supply com cavalry reconnaissance squadron 12th armored toon division MP pla Lcvi troops in cluding 95th evacuation hospital and miscellaneous units DUE AT SAN DIEGO 17 navy personnel Escort Carrier Sargent 1119 passengers including coast guard and merchant marine per sonnel DUE AT SAN FRANCISCO passengers includ ing 380 patients DUE AT NEW PORT NEWS Isaac troops in cluding the 443th heavy mainte nance company 68th quartdmasp ter refrigerator company and 4236th quartermaster sterilization company Saint Albans Victory troops including the 228th mili tary police PW proc platoon Previously Announced Cut in Points Releases 783000 Washington UR More than 800000 additional army personnel including nearly 40000 members of the medical corps became eligi ble for discharge Saturday as con gressmen renewed their demands for an immediate end of the draft The war department Friday night announced new point scores which will let out 15000 5000 dentists 4000 medical ad ministrative corps officers 500 physiotherapists 300 dietitians 350 sanitary corps and 400 veter inary corps officers At the same time previously an nounced cuts in critical scores age and service requirements effec tive Saturday made another 783 000 army officers and enlisted men and women eligible for immediate discharge The navy announced that 3463 000 army and navy perbonnel were returned from the Atlantic Pacific and ChinaBurmaIndia theaters through Nov 27 It said all army personnel other than occupation and service forces would be back from Europe by the end of De cember or in early January and that all personnel injhe China BurmaIndia theater were ex pected to be evacuated bv Aoril 1946 In congress meanwhile Sen Chapman Kivcrcomb R Va a member of the senate military affairs committee said voluntary enlistments were running so high that no further draft is needed He said 81094 men enlisted in the army during the first half of No vember alone whereas President Truman had said it was necessary to draft only 50000 man prevent any interference with he return of veterans Piyercomb was strongly sup ported by Sens Walter F George th Ga Robert A Taft R O and Milton R Yotirg II N Dak He said his resolution to end drafting of fathers would be taken up by the military affairs committee Tuesday and that after that the committee will consider a proposal to end the draft The administration so far has opposed ending the draft claiming that the army and navy cannot be certnin of meeting heir occupa tion and service force needs with out it In this connection both the army and navy said Saturday they would not alter their discharge policies as a result of the new se lective service request to local draft boards to defer students teachers or research workers in the fields of engineering and the science Draft officials said men now in the armed forces who could qual ify as actual or embyroscientists might apply for discharge to go on with theirstudies or work if they obtained the consent of their com manders A war department spokesman said however that the army will continue its policy of refusing blanket discharges out side the point system for any spe cial groups The navy said it would slick to its present dis charge program The release of added doctors and dentists follovs earlier congres sional charges that the army was hoarding medical men badly needed in civilian life Under the new setup critical point scores for doctors and den tists were lowered from 80 o 70 Those 48 years old or over and those who have served 42 months or more now are eligible for dis charge There were a few exceptions Plastic surgeonseye ear and nose specialists orthopedic surgeons and internal medicine specialists still require 80 points and contin uous service since Pearl Harbor to get out Seventy points or 45 months service are required for gastro cnterologists cardiologists urolog ists dermatologists anathetists psychiatrists general surgeons physical therapy officers radio logists and pathologists The point score for nurses was cut from 35 to 25 and the dis charge age from 3r to 30 Nurses nth ordnance MVD company with 2 years senice and limited ordnance MVD company 647lh ordnance AM company G82nd ordnance AM company 554th Mtr Amb company 827th TD battalion and 343rd TC har bor craft company DUE AT BOSTOX Santa troops in cluding headquarters and head quarters battery of the 34th anti aircraft artillery brigade 4th combat camera unit 876th ord nance heavy automotive mainte nance company 351st and 353rd ordnance maintenance companies 572nd 677th 678th and 679th port companies service nurses in this country arc now eligible for discharge Medical administrative corps of ficers require 60 instead of 70 points 42 months of service or they must have reached the age of 42 to be eligible for discharge Physiotherapists need 25 instead of 40 points or two years service or they must have reached 30 For the army at large the fol lowing reductions in critical scores are now effective Enlisted men 60 to 55 points enlisted WACS 34 to 32 male officers ex cent mpriiran Irt ccpt 75 to ficcrs 39 to 37 of   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication