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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: November 30, 1945 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - November 30, 1945, Mason City, Iowa                             r HI1T01Y CO V f OF ARCHIVE NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME VOLLH THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES AVL NORTH 10WANS NEIGHBORS Associated Press ma United Press Full leased Wires Five Cents a Copy MASON CITY IOWA FRIDAY NOVEMBER 30 1945 This Paper Consists of Two One NO 4S HESS ADMITS FAKING MEMORY LOSS GENERAL MILES SAYS OFFICIALS FEARED ATTACK Former Intelligence Head Claims Point of Attack Unknown Washington IP Maj Gen Sherman Miles said Friday that army intelligence very much feared the Japanese would attack when they delivered their diplo matic note here at 1 p m Dec 7 1941 but did not know where the attack was coming Miles head of the intelligence division at the time of the Pearl Harvor disaster told a senate house inquiry committee Friday that war with Japan had become a strong probability in the minds of army leaders early in Decem ber 1941 He said that interception of Tokyos direction to its peace envoys to deliver their note on the fateful Sunday caused him to call the attention of Gen George C Marshall chief of staff to the critical situation We didnt know where it was coming the general testified but we very much feared thai the attack was coming coincidenl with the 1 p m delivery of the Japanese reply Earlier in the diplomatic nego tiations leading up to the out jVbreak of war Secretary of State had given the Japanese jset of counterproposals Gerhard Gesell committee coun el asked Miles what theintelli division had thought abou Bthe possibilities of war with Japan in midNovember of 1941 One thing I felt was thai Japan faced a crisis that wouli almost certainly result in railica action on her part Miles replied He added that this action coulc have taken j3neor moreof sev formsV such as an attack on expansion to the south an assault on Hongkong increased efforts to crush China and last ly Japan might add to her enor rnous burdens and the strain of 1 her military establishment by at tacking the 2 great naval powers the United States and Great Brit ain Miles added that at that time he doubted that we would have gone to war in defense of the Dutch British Siamese or Rus sians Asked if he recognized the im mediate possibility of war with Japan Miles said that Gen Mar shalls message of Nov 27 to Lt Gen Walter C Short army com mander at Hawaii and Gen Doug las MacArthur in the Philippines had been sent because intelligence thought the possibility war had been very much increased This note said that hostile ac tion was possible at any mo Miles said interception of a Dec 3 Japanese message directing their consuls to burn codes transferred this possibility into a probability fnmate Says Squad Boys Hit Miller v Fort Dodge Wren i7 inmate of the Eldora state raining school for boys testified n district court Friday that 2 squad boys inmates slugged iionald Miller because he didnt move fast enough while carrying coal a few hours before he died Wren eleventh witness for the state in he second degree murder trial of Carl Klatt 33 former school guard in connection with Millers death last Aug 29 said the squad boys were jjfck Hoivell and Bernard Ryan Squad boys are youths placed in charge of a group of inmates Ryan hit Miller on the Jaw and in the stomach several times stag gering Miller Wren said adding that Howeli hit Miller in the face Shortly afterward Miller collapsed eventually was taken to the school hospital where he died Ryan later took the stand him and quoted Klatt as saying to Miller during the beating You are going to be one dead kid The remark was made Ryan said after Miller broke a chair on Klatt and had run for another After Wren testified that Klatt was present at the coal pile when Miller collapsed E H Lundy chief defense counsel asked the witness if it wasnt true that Klat was in the engine room at the time The state objected on the ground that Wren previously had testified on that point and the objection was sustained Just before the witness left the stand after a full day of testimony state in redirect examination ob tained from Wren testimony tha Miller had been in on an escape plot in the beginning but that he later decided not to be It was be cause of the plot that Miller and 6 other inmates including Wren allegedly were whipped with a harness tug That was late on the night o August27The next day Millei and the others were assigned t he coal pile Miller died about IS hours after his collapse As Wren who testified he wai 17 years old and in the 8th gradi at the school left the stand Judge Paul H McCoicl said he wished t see the opposing attorneys for a conference during a recess When court resumed the judgi announced he was withdrawing a ruling he made Thursday with reference to a statement alleged madeby Klatt Wren had testifiec le heard Klatt say about the tim Miller was taken to the hospita If Miller dies it will be one les for the state to feed Sioux Cityan Missing in Ship Collision Norfolk Va UR aiachinists Mate Leonard J Mercure Sioux City Iowa was identified Friday as one of 13 navy men missing after the collision of a seaplane salvage derrick and the Tanker McClelland Creek in Nor folk harbor Wednesday The smalt salvage vessel sank immediately navy officials said Ill From Fumes Des Moines persons who became ill from breathing fumes from a newlypainted fur nace were revived Thursday by a fire department emergency squad and 2 others who became ill were attended by the firemen Mrs Hazel Hogland was the only one hospitalized and her condition was not believed serious The vic tims included 3 young children THE WORLDS BEST BUY Victory Loan Bonds Buy your this week Bring the boys horn and fight inflation Weather Report FORECAST Mason City Partly cloudy Frida night and Saturday not muc change in temperature lowes Friday night about 30 lowa Cloudy east fair and warm er west Friday Partly cloud Friday night and Saturday Wanner east Saturday Minnesota Considerable cloud ness Friday and Saturdaj Warmer south and central por tions Saturday IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistic for 24 hour period ending at oclock Friday morning Maximum 34 Minimum 27 At 8 a m Friday 28 YEAR AGO Maximum 22 Minimum 13 Precipitation trace Snow Ji inch YAMASHITA ON WITNESS Gen Tomoyuki Yamashita testifies before an American military tribunal at Manila in his own defense at his trial as a war crim inal AP Wirephoto General Yamashita Denies Knowledge of Manila Killings Makes Final Plea to Court in Trial for Japanese War Crimes Push Search for Kidnapers of Patrolman Denison saarcli for the kidnapers of State Patrolman John Mahnke centered in northwestern Iowa and Minnesota Friday after the Iowa highway patrol head quarters reported the green Hud son automobile had been found abandoned Thursday near Orms by Minn Officers said the kidnapers 2 men and a blond woman may have escaped in a green 1941 Chevrolet that was stolen from Okabena Minn about 30 miles from Hartley Iowa where Mahnke was left handcuffed to a country schoolroom stove A farmer near Ormsby which is 60 miles northeast of Hartley was approached by one of the trio Chief C A Knee of the state high way patrol said he had been in formed and asked to tow the Hud son into town because the clutch was burned out Knee said the farmer towed the Hudson to a garage and saw the trio drive away in another car the kind or model of which he was un able to identify Mahnke was ordered to bed Thursday by a physician as pre caution against pneumonia after being chained for 7 hnurs in the cold schOolhouse The patrolman fastened to the stove with his own landcuffs freed himself by kick ng pieces of the stove loose Protest Move to Russians Stockholm of German Polish Austrian and Bal tic internees delayed their transportation from Swedish internment camps to Russianoccupied territories Friday by mass suicide at tempts arid selfinflicted wounds Prisoners attacked themselves with knives razors bits of glass and even sharp stones Some of the internees formed tight rings against Swedish military and police who surrounded their barracks preparatory to carryin them to a soviet deportation ship They held off the officials while others stabbedthemselves Many barracks soon were splashed with blood Most ot the prisoners were former members of the German army who fled to Sweden at the time of the German unconditional sur render TAVERN LOST IN RIDGEWAY FIRE Operator Injured in Jump From 2nd Floor Manila Tomovuki Yamashita looked Friday at a prosecution map marking the sites where 60000 Filipinos were slaughtered and denied doggedly hat he ever heard of any the killings Chief Prosecutor Ulaj Robert M Kerr of Portland Ore ham mering at the ivar crimes defen dant in a second day of cross ex amination asked Yamashita to examine wall mans with many dots showing where atrocities oc curred Do you deny before the com mission that you knew of none of these 60000 killings of Filipino andother men women and chil dren Kerr demanded The poker faced Yamashita looked at Kerr squarely and an swered I did not toow and did not hear of these events Explain to the commission Kerr directed how 60000 mur ders in a period of 7 months oc curred without your knowledge I absolutely did not know Yamashita insisted Kerr then told Yamashita this was his final opportunity to ex plain to the commission how he failed to know Yamashita re sponded with what apparently was his final plea The facts are he said I constantly under attack by Ameri can forces and I was under pres sure day and night TJnflcr these circumstances I had to study plans to combat the superior American forces which took all my lime and efforts Seven days after my arrival faced American landing forces was unable to inspect units as a result of the inefficiency of the Japanese system in unifying the command The situation was highly complicated Troops were greatly scattered and communica tion was the poorest I was iorcedto face the Araeri ans with subordinates I did not aiow I put all my efforts to bet ering the troops discipline even n combat but the Japanese troops were untrained and most inferior and there wasnt time to bring them up to my expectations 4 SHIPS ARRIVE WITH SOLDIERS Seattle Wash to ar rive in harbor here on the John B Floyd Friday are the following North lowans Tr Raymond t Lesllna McGregor Tr Pete Kanawha Tl Glenn E Olsnn S Sgt ra Roe C Ilojle Clirion On the La Crosse Victory due at New York were the following North lowans Sjl Lloyd H Feler Northwooa T4 Joseph C Xettleton Greene T5 Alvin P Keeper Klemme Pic nwijhfR JUtdracnI EslhetvlIIe FIc Date C Burns Cbnpin Prt Emerson W Smith Oetwein T5 If B Thompson Kockwcll S Sfl Bonalil V Chlupjch Jfjso City Scheduled to arrive at San Francisco on the Dutchess were the following North lowans Tl Clyde A Richardson Emmctsbnrr nick C Eauman Allison We Bernard J IlruninE Corwilh at San Francisco on the Admiral Simms were the follow ing North lowans Maj William S Jlonlux Algona Maj Tracy A Horn Oiare S Sri Lclloy A Grabam Whittemore T1 Gordon D Tabor Osate M Agrees to Government Peace Parley on Walkout By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS General Motors is not ready to reopen wage negotiations with the TO United Auto Workers but the corporation has agreed to discuss lie unions strike with a government conciliator GM Vice President Harry W Anderson will meet with Edgar L barren U S conciliation service chief in Washington Tuesday witti he aim Warren said of Betting negotiations resumed as soon as ossible Anderson expressed the hope Secretary of Labor Schweilenbach vould find time to attend the meeting Earlier this week Schwellen ach and Warren met with ifficials GM stood firm in its refusal to icgotiate until the union modi ies its 30 per cent wage rate ncrease request and halts what he company termed illegal picketing of GM plants The ompanys president Charles E Wilson said the picketing issue vould be discussed at a meeting between company and union rep esentatives Friday the first such conference since the walkout be an Nov 21 A rcHard was offered by he tJAWCIO at Saeinaw for the arrest and conviction of per sons responsible for throwing jricks through a window at the lome of one GM executive and rolling a lo against the door of another The union disclaimed any responsibility Altogether 225000 GM em estimated Fire causing at more than loss 55000 the Kornertav ern part of the Harry Wemark garage and part of the Standard Oil service station on highway No 9 in Htdgeway early Fridaj morning The buildings which ar close together were owned b Helmer E Hovden Arnold Hovden who operatec the tavern and lived on the 2nc floor was injured when he jumped from the building The Decorah rural fire Corp was called to assist the local de partment 2 Centervllle Men Hurt in Car Accident Des Monies Center ville Iowa men were injure Thursday when their truck lef the paving and rolledover 3 time on an East Des Moines street The driver Johnnie Fields 2 suffered internal injuries fac cuts and shock Claude Downing 42 received a fractured righ ankle and head cuts Downing told police the true skidded off the pavement and h a soft spot in the shoulder Botf men were thrown clear o th truck on to the pavement ployes were idle including 50000 white collar workers kept away from their jobs by picketing Pro ductionwjftj Stalled in 7U GM plants The national total of jobless in labor disputes stood at 530000 CIO representatives of employes of Montgomery Ward ana com pany in Chicago have agreed to meet with company representa tives to discuss a proposed 60 cents an hour minimum wage The present minimum was in creased from 45 Vi to cents Nov ZS The mail order house announced an increase to 60 cents effective Dec 13 for its nonunion employes in Chicago and said it would like to meet with the union to discuss writing a similar raise into a contract covering CIO members No date for the meeting has been set A demonstration 1w e e k work stoppage against Ward plants in many parts of the country is scheduled to continue through Saturday More settlements on the basis of a 15cent hourly pay raise were underway in the 9weekold Pacific northwest lumber dispute An early breakup of the strike of 60000 AFL lumber and saw mill workers was in sight A possible walkout to back up the CIO steelworkers a day wage increase campaign will be considered at a meeting of the Decker Plant Workers Join Strike Vote Employes of the Jacob E Decker and Sons packing company joined in the nationwide strike vote Fri day of more than 100000 members ot the United Packing House Workers America CIO on the subject of the Unions demand for a 25 cent an hour wage increase The Packinghouse Workers strike vote is the second national CIO strike vote to be taken this week the first being the NLRB conducted vote Wednesday among the United Steelworkers in which the workers voted to strike if nec essary by a 5 to 1 majority A strike in the St Paul area would affect SwiftsArmour Ris kin packing Superior packing and Bartusch packing and would ex tend into the Dokotas and Wis consin Voting was scheduled to con tinue until p m Friday ul the Mason City packing plant In Omaha first returns Friday heavily favored a strike in the balloting an estimated 10000 Omaha packinghouse workers Plants involved at Omalia are Armour Wilson Cutlahy Swift Kingan Nebraska Beef South Omaha Packing and Omaha Coki Storage Cyrus A Slater NLRB field relations examiner from Kansas City was one of those in charge THE WORLDS BEST BUY Victory Loan Bonds Buy yours this week BrinR the boys home and fight inflation unions wage policy committee in Pittsburgh Dec 10 The unions rank and file voted in favor of a strike The national labor relations board will poll more than 100 600 CIO United Packinghouse Workers on the strike question Friday A 25ccnt an hour wage boost is the unions demand Unlucky Teller Springfield 111 stitious customers caused the Springfield Marine bank to take down the No 13 sign over a tell ers window The teller in No 13 had so little to do the other bank em ployes were complaining Warns U S of Atomic Race With Russia Washington JP Dr Irving Langmuir predicted Friday that if an atomic armament race devel ops Russia will produce its first atomic bomb in about 3 years and possibly accumulate them far faster than the United States The associate research director of General Electric gave the sen ate atomic energy committee half a dozen reasons why he said the Russians would have an advan tage 1 A larger population and it can be regimented 2 They have a remarkable sys tem of incentives which is rapid ly increasing the efficiency of their industrial production 3 No unemployment 4 No strikes 5 They have a deep appre ciation of pure and applied sci ence 6 They have already planned a far more extensive program in science than any contemplated by us We must consider also that the Russians have continued the training of scientists during the war to a far greater extent than we have the chemist said Fur thermore they have available in any atomic energy program the knowledge and technical skill of German scientists and technicians Russia certainly has ample re sources in uranium Langmuir testified that If Rus sia considered the incentives great cnougrh she couM mobilize her re sources for an atomic energy pro gram get her people to forego a higher standard of living and de vote 10 per cent of her production capacity to a 5 year atomic ener gy plan In contrast he said before the war the United States devoted only 004 per cent of its national income to research This rose to about 05 per cent during wartime Far from advocating that the United States Russia indulge in an atomic armament race Lang muir proposed that the govern ments of Great Britain Canada and this nation seek immediate contact with the soviet govern ment to secure a tentative agree ment based on the TrumanAt tlaeMackenzie King formula of November 15 This called for an immediate start toward outlawing the atomic bomb as a war weapon Detailed information concerning the practi cal industrial application of atom ic energy would be withheld from other countries until effective safeguards are devised Terming international contro the newly discovered force o the utmost urgency Langmuir said that pending this it is essen tial that we have adequate wise national control He cautioned that such secrecy as was imposed on scientists dur ing the war would stifle future progress HITLERS NO 2 DEPUTY TAKES RESPONSIBILITY Hess Expresses Wist to Continue on Trial With Fellow Nazis Nuernberg Rudolf Hess told the international military tribunal Friday that lie accepted full responsibility for all I have done signed or cosigned and that hewished to continue on trial with his fellow nazis Hess declared that lie had feigned lass of memory even to his own attorney for tactical reasons The court adjourned for the day without announcing a ruling on the mental fitness of the form er No 2 deputy fuehrer whom allied psychiatrists have reported sane but suffering from hysteria Hess case was brought up alter a surprise German witness testi fied that Germanys leading spy expert long plotted against Hitler ami finally was executed in 1944 after the failure of the bomb plot against the fuehrer Adm Walter Wilhclm Canaris mysterious Greekblooded chief of German armys counterespion age seclion was named as a leader the antiHitler military clique by Moj Gen Erwin Lahousen Canaris aide Lahousen was the first witness called by the prose cution to relate the grim inside story of German scheming and ag gression Lnliouseii said that Canaris who ran the German spy service dis guised as a commercial agency duringthe days of the German republic hated Hitler and headed a military clique whSch plotted against the nazi leader from the time he rose to power Canaris was among scores of military lead ers executed after Hitler escaped death in thc1944 assassination at temnl Lahousen said Canaris unsuc cessfully protested against mass murder and illtreatment of Rus sian prisoners who were starved until cannabalisrn He said high command orders to assassinate 2 French generals Mavime Weygand and Henri Gi raud were thwarted by Canaris Lahousen testified that Field Marshal Wilhelm Kietel one of the defendants wanted German secret agents to murder the 2 French military leaders after the fall of France to remove them as possible centers of French re sistance The prosecutions surprise wit ness declared former foreign min ister Joachim von Ribbentrop once asserted that all farms of Poles must be burned to the ground and all Jews killed in the invasion ol Poland Hitler ivas responsible for the policy oF starvation that led to cannibalism among Russian pris oners Lahousen declared He said preparations were made to lake Russian prisoners to Germany but this was countermanded we heard oh Hitlers personal orders This meant there was vast con gestion at the front he com mented People could not be fed nor clothed and cannibalism en sued During repeated trips I undertook with Canaris I saw some of this with my own eyes Orders also were issued to brand some soviet prisoners he testified Advocate Remedies for Acute Housing Shortage Rock Island HI for the ncute housing shortage were suggested in a resolution adopted by the building officials conference of America Inc at the closing session ot their convention here The resolution urges that con struction of housing be given pri ority and that a holiday period be declared on nonessential con struction It also asked that all temporary war housing now va cant be dismantled immediately and the materials salvaged for new housing THE WORLDS BEST BUY Victory Loan Bonds Buy yours this week Bring the boys home and light inflation OBSERVE TjRIPLE GOLDEN WEDDING sisters who were married 50 years ago leave St Matthews Catholic church Long Beach Cal with their husbands after attending a High Mass celebrated in honor their golden wedding an niversary Left to right Mr and Mrs John Martin of Van Nuys Cal Mr and Mrs Peter Kirsch of Long Beach and Mr and Mrs Pitstick of South Charleston Ohio AP Wirephoto x   

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