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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: November 10, 1945 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - November 10, 1945, Mason City, Iowa                                NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME Of HISTORY AND ARCHIVES THE NEWSPAPER THAT VOL Lit MAKES ALL NORTH 10WANS NEIGHBORS Associated Press and United Press Full Leased Wiie Five Cents a Copy Latest College FOOTBALL RESULTS Iowa Illinois Army Notre Dame K Navy Michigan Indiana Minnesota Northwestern Wisconsin I Ohio State Pittsburgh Columbia Penn EIK1 Penn State Temple EQ m Drake la State Teachers Heavy Fighting in Chinese Civil War Chinwangtao fighting between Chinese communists and troops of the central government broke out along the Great Wall of China north of here Friday night bringing artillery and heavy mortars into play in the Chinese civil war for the first time New clashes were reported along the main ChimvangtaoPeiping MASON CITY IOWA SATURDAY NOVEMBER 10 1945 NO 28 ATTLEE ARRIVES US railroad south of here American marines reported the boomingof the heavy weapons I could be heard throughout the night from the direction of Shan haikwan fortress city which is the eastern anchor of the Great Wall a key sateway Into Manchuria army in control and strongly en trenched U S Out by Spring Chungking Gen Al bert C Wedemeyer commander of American forces in China pre dicted Saturday that all United States forces in China would be out of the country by early spring and asserted flatly that the United Slates would not help China move troops into Manchuria He em phatically declared at a press con ference that U S forces and re sources were not being employed to assist the central government against dissident groups Three Chinese were found hanged in railroad yards which are 15 miles south of here A sizeable forceof Knomintang troops are encamped at the Junc tion us a grnard and a small de tachment of American marines of PACKINGHOUSE ELECTION SET Minneapolis national abor relations board announced Saturday that strike votes would e taken Nov 16 by production and maintenance employes at 3 Towa packing plants The companies involved are the lath Packing Co Waterloo and he Tobin rackingCo plants at Fort Dodge and Estherville Major issue involved the NLRB said was the United Packinghouse Workers of America CIO objec ipn to the employers refusal to a 25 cents an hour general wage in the first there division1 are billeted There haveBeen no inci dents marines in the past few days and no marines have been wounded presence of the Americans however prevented the commu nists from carrying out an in tended attack on the village of ShinLung which is also on the railroad The communists had advised the marines of the intended at tack and asked them to pull back out of danger during the fight The marines assigned to guard duties at a doubletrestle bridge at the village refused to leave their posts The communists iailed to carry out the attack which was aimed at a garrison of still armed Japanese Deployment Timetable Paris redeploy ment timetable of U S army di visions TSTH INFANTRY Now shipping out of Marseille last units due to be on way by Monday 8TH ARMORED AND 66TH INFANTRY On high seas 26TH INFANTRY In Camp Pittsburgh Oise section 89TH INFANTRY In Le Havre staging area due to leave abou Nov 28 I2TH ARMORED Now arriv ing inMarseille staging area 36th79th 90th infantry 82nd airborne 16th corps Alerted for movement Social Worker Dies Des Moines 4 year ill ness was fatal Friday night to Horace S Hillingsworth 77 wide ly known Des Moines socia worker He helped organize the Iowa State Conference of Social Work in 1898 and served as its president in 1314 A sister Mrs Luella Harris Salem Ohio sur vives British Open Full Warfare in Java Rift Batavia Java In dian troops engaging in full scale warfare to disarm resisting In donesian nationalists opened an attack on Soerabaja Saturday British shells and bombs raked the naval base 500000 popula tion Indonesians were evacuating their families from the city Indonesian spokesmen said Brit ish naval guns as well as land ar tillery opened fire at 6 a m 5 p m Friday central standard time in preparation for the attack by the full fifth Indian infantry division British planes Mosquito bombers and Thunderbolt lighters strafed and bombed the postoftice and government buildings in Soerabaja and one Mosquito was forced down when damaged The nationalists said large num bers of native youths assembled in Jogjakarta 175 miles to the southwest had decided to proceed to Soerabaja to reinforce their countrymen and were rallying to the cry fight for freedom Foreign Minister Soebardjo of the unrecognized Indonesian re public said the telephone man ager at Soerabaja had reported that the natives there apparently had decided to carry out a scorched earth policy in their flight This account would indi catethat the natives had little hope of standing and fighting in the city At stake in the developing Hght ng is control of the rich Nether lands East Indies with a popula tion of 41000000 Indonesians The native nationalists are seeking Teedom from Dutch colonial con trol Lt Gen Sir Philip Christison allied commander in the islands announced the opening of the Brit ish attack The British troops jumped off from positions which they hjeld around the cite inthe face of light sniping giur fire Soebardjo said the telephone exchange had been abandoned British authorities explained that disrupted communications had resulted in the delay in an nouncing the attack British Keep Brigade I Marine Commandos London British gov ernment announced Saturday it plans to maintain a peacetime bri gade of 3000 royal marine com mandos and that in the future commando training will be cum pulsory for all marines Marine units will replace the army com mando groups which War Secre tary J J Lawson announced re cently would be abandoned Elect President Davenport of L E Wass director of industrial and adult education in the Davenport schools as president of the Iowa Vocational association was an nounced Friday He succeeds Cliff Hardie Chariton Mason City Has Low of 9 Degrees Mason City and Spencer shared the dubious honor of having the lowest temperature recordings in the state Saturday morning Spencor reported a low of 7 de grees above zero while Mason Citys reading was 9 degrees a a m according to the CAA weather station at the airport Temperatures varied greatly within short distances however as shown by the fact that the low at the KGLO weather station miles east was 12 above The mercury climbed slowl throughout the day hitting 21 degrees at 8 a m passing the freezing mark at noon to 36 de grees at 1 p m in Mason City The weather bureau forecas considerable mild weather be fore thermometers make another dip into low readings Mondaj night and Tuesday Other low readings Friday night included 15 at Fort Dodge 16 at Sioux City 17 at Charles City and 18 at Ames Atlanti and Cedar Kapids Bny yonrVictory Bonds an Stamps from your GlobeGazette carrier boy AIRMADA ON DISPLAY 11 planes of the AAF Victory Loan Airmada are shown above parked m front of the administration building on the Mason City muni cipal airport just after they arrived here for the bond exhibit Saturday and Sunday See for yourselves what your bonds have bought is the slogan of the exhibit The planes include 1 B25 Mitchell bomber 2 transport 3 AT6 Texan train er 4 P47D Thunderbolt fighter 5 P38 Lightning fighter 6 OG4A cargo glider 7 B24 Liberator bomber 8 B17 Flying Fortress 9 P51 Mustang fighter 10 C46 Commando transport 11 A26 Invader attack bomber All visitors will be permitted to inspect the planes including the interiors and their equipment Persons buying bonds from the special booth in the administration building will be permitted to sit at the controls with the pilots Lock photo K and A engr EXPECT MORE HOUSESHORTAGE Sees Doubling Up ih Living Problem Washington least 3 000000 American cluding those of 1000000 war vet double up with other families in order to have living accommodations in 1946 Thats the outlook John B Blandford Jr national housing administrator gave in a letter to mayors of all cities of more than 25000 population along with a warning of a continued tight housing supply next year He said about 1000000 families are living doubled up now and that preliminary estimates show that another 2000000 families must double up by Dec 31 1946 Unless their plight can be relieved by a far greater volume of new housing than anyone considers possible This would be beyond a goal of 475000 units hoped to be completed in 1946 Sayingat least a million fami lies of veterans will have accom modations in the presently occu pied housing supply Blandford declared they wont find enough homes unless cities establish some system of organizing their housing supply and of giving veterans preference in turnover Combat Ships Displayed at Mason City The thermometer climbed above he freezing mark Saturday noon o boost attendance at the after noon exhibit of the AAF Victory Loan Airmada at the local airport With the mercury at 20 degrees Saturday morning curiosity con erning the air forces lop combat ilanes was somewhat dulled but ven so several hundred cars ar ived during the forenoon As the hermomcter passed the freezing mark to 36 decrees at 1 p m at endance climbed with it how ever and prospects were for a remsndous crowd Sunday if the veathcrman fulfills his prophecy of warmer weather Sixteen officers and enlisted men of the 34 here with the Air nada have been in overseas com bat The 13 returned pilotshave a Bay your Victory Bonds and Stamps Jtroln your GlobeGazette carrier boy Ike Heads for Bitter Debate on Merger Washington Eis enhower was headed for the United States Saturday amid in dications he will be asked for his views in the increasingly bitter controversy over consolidation of the armed forces Announcement from Eisenhow ers Frankfurt headquarters that he will appear before committees of congress came only a few hours before the secretary of the navy protested to the secretary of war utterances by it Gen James H Doolittle during testimony in support of the merger proposal Secretary Forrestal told Secre tary Patterson in a letter If we allow an honest difference over principle to degenerate into an exchange of personalities we shall do irreparable harm to the end which we all seek in the name national security The comrade ship of all branches of the armed services While Doolittle was before the senate military committee Friday Senator Hill DAla remarked that Admiral Chester W Nimitz EISENHOWER DOOUTTLE had said sea power brought sur render of the Japanese and Ad miral Marc Mitscher had credited navy carrierbased airplanes with winning the Pacific air war Said the former 8th air force commander Admiral Nimitz and Admiral Mitscher are great commanders but his was won by teamwork Each of the3 agenciesild7ils best No single agency alone was responsible I do feel very strongly it was not seupower that compelled Japan to sue for peace And thai it was not carrier strength tha won the air war Our B29 boys are resting un easily in their graves as a result of those 2 comments Forrestal said in his letter to Patterson Gen Doolittle also referred to arguments advanced by witnesses before the committeeas hypo crisy As civilian head of the nav al service I should not let charges against high ranking naval offi cers of hypocrisy or partisanship to the point of callousness go un noticed But to avoid adding to the un desirable heat which it seems to me has already entered these de liberations I refrain from making th fo any direct reply Moreover airsea record 61 speaks or the B29 ft WELCOME For 2 days the municipal air port is host to thousands of Mason City residents and visi tors from the surrounding com munities while the army air forces Airmada of combat planes and combat veterans ap pears in connection with the Victory Loan drive Mason City is pleased and honored to offer the facilities of its hew and modern air field lor this purpose Citizens of all North Iowa are welcomed as our guests Active support of the Victory Loan drive is an important step in postwar readjustment and as it has done in the past Mason City should oversubscribe its quota in this final bond drive H E BRUCE Mayor was the first allied flyer over Sar dinia and holds the distinguishe flying cross and air medal Veteran of the RAF is 2nd Lt Frederick M Herr 27 who is th C47 copilot here He was z flight sergeant with the HAF from September 1941 to May 1943 when he was commissioned a flight officer in the AAF He flew Hawker Hurricanes Whitleys an Wellingtons for the RAF and re turned to the U S in July 1943 He served on 23 missions totalinj 420 combat hours and has the Or der of the British Empire and dis languished flying medal from th British government 1st Lt Warren W McAllister 24 pilot of the Fortress also wa a B17 pilot in Europe with 2 missions and 250 combat hours He has flyin cross air medal with 3 cluster and distinguished unit badge Late Friday afternoon a 2n 47 arrived here from Abilen AAF Texas It P47N a late model than the P47D which cam n from Madison Wis with th Airmada Piloted by 2nd Lt Gar rettChildress it was flownhere t replace the P47D pilotedby Cap erald L Woodruff with the Air mada The P38 left the Mason Cit airport at 11 a m Saturday fo Sioux City to get repairs The shi is scheduled to return late Satur day and will be on exhibition a day Sunday Visiting Hours are from 9 a m to dark both Saturday and Sun day total of 617 missions and 4345 hours All told the entire others were ground a total of 200 months overseas Four of the pilots will tionod alternately in the bond booth at the administration build ing All have outstanding comba records as can be seen following 1st Lt Burden L Davidson 24 pilot of the B24 Liberator is from Oakland Cal He servec overseas in the Pacific from Sept 20 1943 UTSept 1 1944 as a Lib erator pilot over the New Heb rides Solomons and Admiralties He has a total of 50 combat mis sions and 750 hours and was awarded the air medal with 8 oakleaf clusters Capt Robert P Senccal 27 pi lot of the C17 has rolled np the most combat hours of anyone in the Airmada with a total of 800 He flew 8 different types of ships over Africa Sicily and Italy in cluding the A20 P51 P38 A 36 B25 B17 PIQ and F39 He Protest Assessments Omaha 830 protes were filed against Des Moines as sessments this year Bert L Zuve Des Moines assessor told a Omaha Citizens committee Fri day Of the protests only 76 were appealed in court he said eek Solution or Peace in Labor Parley Washington for method of ending labors juris iciional strife continued Saturday hile mostdelegates to President Yunnans labormanagement con erence began an Armisticeday oliday weekend The committee assigned to iuris ictional problems so far has of ired no report but It had before Secretary of tabor Schwellen achs proposal last Monday that rganized labor designate a czar o iron out interunion disputes Labor delegates sounded out in ormally so far have showed no reat enthusiasm for the technique Schwelienbach suggested ad met the problem in baseball nd the moving picture industry Nevertheless the committee on epresentation and jurisdictional was reported to be eeking improved machinery by vhich unions could settle the roublesome disputes themselves This group arranged meetings n Sunday and Monday but a ma ority of the industry and labor elegates gathered here to pro note labor peace already were eaving Washington for the week nd They already had one solid ac omplishmcnt reported confer nce Secretary George W Taylor Susiness and labor delegates alike have fully accepted the principle f collective bargaining he said Taylor said this was no meager achievement even though now vritten into the Wagner labor re ations act because the postwar abor parley of 1919 cracked up iver an inability to agree on a stating that workers are entitled to be represented by unions or spokesmen of their own choosing US MAY TRAIN CHINA SOLDIERS Chungking fF The United States almost definitely has de cided to place a postwar military mission in China to train Chinese soldiers sailors and airmen Lt Albert C Wedemeyer com mander of American China said Saturday forces in The projected military advis ory group he said would range from 2000 to 6000 men drawn from the regular U S army and navy It wouldnot participate In military action he asserted Wedemeyer commented that he had been mentioned as head of themission but declared he was not ready to say whether he will accept until final decision on its establishment is announced from Washington Expect Stalin Return to Active Duty Soon Moscow foreign diplo matic source said Saturday a high soviet official had indicated that Generalissimo Stalin was expected to return to active duty about the middleof November He saidthat when he inquired why Stulin did not appear at the Red square parade on the 28th anniversary of the Russian revo lution Nov 7 he was told that it would have been very risky for anyone coming from the warm climate of the south where the generalissimo spent his recent va cation to expose himself for sev eral hours to the frigid tempera tures of Moscows streets This seems the most logical explanation of Stalins absence I have yet received commented the diplomatic source who cannot be identified by name BRITISH LEADER HERE FOR TALK ON ATOM BOMB Joins Truman and MacKenzie King for Parley on Potomac Washington Min isters Clement Attlee and W L MacKenzie King came to Wash ington Saturday for an historic conference with President Tru man on the future of atomic en ergy With their arrival he house announced that Mr Iranian would begin his discussions with the British and Canadian leaden immediately after a white house luncheon Eben Ayers assistant press sec retary told reporters that the president had a very definite agenda laid out1 for the confer ence but gave no details Arrangements will be made at the initial meeting for further talks Ayers said It already had been announced that they will carry their conversation to the yacht Sequoia during an Armistice day cruise Sunday on the Potomac Invited to the white house luncheon and to the first confer ence were Secretary of State Byrnes Lord Halifax British am bassador Admiral William D Leahy chief of staff to the presi dent Lester B Pearson Canadian ambassador and J H Rowan Att lees private secretary The British leaders plane landed at a m CST at the National airport He left England at p m CST Friday fly ing by way of Newfoundland Despite speculation in Britain that Generalissimo Stalin might tafte part in the meeting both the white houseand Attlees office said theyknew nothing of such a plan Mr Truman said somfc time agro he would discuss atomic problems first with the leaders of Britain and Canada which shared In war time development of the bomb and later with other countries Diplomatic officials said the aim of the conference which will last several days is to consider ways of handling the atomic bomb and policy questions on the peaceful development of atomic energy A variety of other subjects could come whole field of BritishAmerican relations and the troublesome questions of how to get on better with Hussia and what to do about the Palestine Jewish problem But President Truman has said his purpose is to talk about atomic problems and Attlee indicated as much in a speech delivered before he left England Friday No terminal date for the con ference has been announced but some diplomats familiar with the preparations said it might last about 5 days As he stepped from the Ameri canmade Skymaster he was greeted by Secretary of State Byrnes British Ambassador Lord Strike Picture At a Glance Halifax and other British and American officials These in cluded Brig Gen Harry Vaughan president Trumans military aide Halifax first to meet him brought him over to Byrnes who shook hands warmly Attlee told Byrnes that the 80 hour journey on the whole had been a nice one A chill wind was blowing and skies were gray as the British leader arrived for the avowed purpose of trying to help make the world safe from atom bomb destruction in the future Idle Reaches 264000 By UNITED PRESS Despite a threat of widespread walkouts in the automotive indus try the overall total of strikeidle remained relatively static Satur day involving 254000 workers The major disputes Greyhound Bus employes seeking higher wages continued to tie up the companys operations in 7 southwestern and 18 eastern states brightened for settlement of a strike of AFL and CIO machinists which has idled 55000 San Francisco bay area workers as federal conciliators brought company and union representatives together for additional negotiations Automobile Workers CIO officials in timated there might be positive strike action throughout the General Motors system and called for a stration in Canada to support a walkout already idling 20000 Ford workers and 10000 sympathizers in Windsor Ont AFL lumber workers continued a 2months strike against operators in 5 northwestern states to back demands for a industrywide minimum hourly wage Tenn Firestone Tire and Rubber Co work ers voted overwhelmingly in favor of a work stoppage to support demands for more pay and a shorter work week in what CIO rubber workers said was the start of a nationwide strike poll T Slass Workers were away from their jobs at 12 LibbeyOwensFord and Pittsburgh Plate Glass Co plants in a strike that f allowed a breakdown in contract negotiations Weather Report FORECAST Mason City Increasing cloudiness and warmer Saturday night and Sunday with occasional light rain Sunday Low temper aluresabout 25 Towa Partly cloudy Saturday be coming mostly cloudy Saturday with occasional light rain be ginning over extreme south por tion Saturday night spreading over most of state Sunday Not so cold Saturday night Rising temperatures Sunday Shippers Forecast Northwest 20 northeastsouthwest 25 south east 30 Minnesota Partly cloudy Saturday night and Sunday Not quite so cold Saturday night Wanner Sun day IN flIASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics for 24 hour period ending at 8 oclock Saturday morning Maximum 27 Minimum 12 At 8 a m Saturday 20 YEAR AGO Maximum 40 Minimum 35 1 Precipitation trace   

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