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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: October 26, 1945 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - October 26, 1945, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME DEPARTMENT Of AND A MOINtS aUfftJumfUwat VOL IM MARK AVL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS AModattd Pren United Prea run leased Wilts MASON CITY IOWA FRIDAY OCTOBER 26 1945 US Rift RELATIONS FOR JAPAN CONTROL POLICY BETTER Discuss Proposal of Soviet for 4 Power Council Washington be tween theUnited States and Rus sia seemed on the mend Friday in an atmosphere of better under standing These were the heartening de velopments 1 State department disclosure that ihe 2 governments were dis cussing the soviet proposal for a 4power council IT S Russia Britain China to govern Japan 2 Indications Russia would agree that when differences arose in the council the TJ S position should govern 3 Timely delivery of Russias united nations ratification docu ments which permitted the World Security Organization to become a fact Wednesday Washington officials hoped the weekend might bring at least one more airclearing event an an nouncement that Russia had de cided to participate in the allied far eastern advisory commission which will meet here for the first time Tuesday Announcement Thursday of the continuing 4power council dis cussions climaxed a day in which government officials and newsmen debated this question When Foreign Commissar Molo tov first proposed the council for Japan did he mean one like that setup to govern Germany or one likethose established to administer fprrner German satellite nations Mtmadea On the Berlin council 4 allies have equal authority The chair manship alternates among Gen Elsenhower British Field Mar shal Montgomery Russian Mar shal Zhnkov and French Gen De Lattre De Tassigny All decisions mast be unanimous On the Balkan commissions the U S and Britain have equal rep resentation with Russia but in the event of conflicting views the sov iet position governs TheU S would not agree to a Berlintype council for Japan Of ficials say the problemof govern ing the Japanese home islands is entirely different They also say the Berlin coun cil has been hamstrung by the unanimity rule under which one dissenting nation can block action favored by the other Thursday nights state depart ment announcement reiterated that tbe original soviet proposal ap peared to propose a control coun cil for Japan which in its import ant aspects would closely resemble the control council for Germany It added that recent diplomatic exchanges indicated Russia is not now insisting upon this posi Ijrtn Thlj Paper Consists rf Two Russia tion DROP CEILINGS ON COMMODITIES Lifting of Ban Oct 3 f Washington will be removed Oct 31 from 52 focd commodities the OPA an nounced Friday At the same time they will be suspended for SO days on 3 others The suspension applies to canned carrots and carrot juice fresh frozen and canned crabmeat and vegetable seeds The action does not affect canned carrots sold a baby or junior foods The suspensions and exemptionb were described as in keeping with OPAV policy of removing controls from minor items so thai more time can be devoted to the job of controlling prices of major items that enter everyones living costs Among commodities exempted from controls are Canned oysters clams anc salted lake herring frozen beets citrus segments coconuts figs melons mushrooms and pears pretzels and ice cream cones bou illon cubes and bulk or packaged dehydrated vegetables except peas and beans Form Jap Union Tokyo first independ ent union of newspaper employes in Japan was Sormed Friday by workers of the morning daily Yomiuri Hochf Buy your Victory Bonds and Stamps from your GlobeGazette carrier toy COMMISSAR MOLOTOV Small Council WARSHIPS SET FOR NAVY SHOW Truman to Review Ships in New York New York grey ships of the Atlantic and Pacific fleets slipped into their Hudson river positions Friday in an awesome 1 mile display of naval might which President Truman and a ihankful nation will acclaim Sat day Thursday night blinding shafts lorn the searchlights of 11 famed menofwar opened the victory celebration of the greatest Navy day in American history Ceremonies will be held and veteran warships saluted in ports throughout the nation on Navy day but themost spectacular tribute will take place in New York when re views an armada As 1200 navy planes roar over head the greatest number ever assembled for such an occasion Truman aboard the destroyer Reashaw will precede along the line of vessels anchored in midstream The ships range from the larg est warship afloat the super carrier slim fast pa trol vessels Many still bear the scars of Pacific warfare of kami kaze planes and bomb hits Among them is the famed battleship Mis souri scene of the Japanese sur render ceremony Vice Admiral Emory S Land war shipping administrator or dered the 4300 vessels of the American merchant marine in cluding about 300 now in New York harbor to dress ship for the occasion President Trumans first Navy act will be to commission the 45000ton aircraft carrier Franklin D Roosevelt sister shipof the Midway The late presidents widow will attend the ceremony Bevin Warns of Starvation for Europeans London Secretary Bevin declared in a house of com mons debate Friday that hunger and privation in Europe may bring a further prolific human loss more devastating than the gun or the atomic bomb Warning of the danger of a terrible winter in Europe Bevin commented that if the United States congress failed to grant the additional 51600000 000 fund for the united nations relief and rehabilitations admin istration UNRRA will be broke and the situation we will have to face in a few weeks time will be disastrous He said however he could not discuss UNRRA further because the appropriation was the subject of debate in congress Eevin said conditions in dev astated Europe resulted from a policy Hitler imposed When the nazis discovered they could not win the war Bevin said they de cided to leave Europe in a state of complete anarchy We had studied the situation for months and when we saw what had happened we had to al ter all our plans and redevise the system Bevin continued He described the Germany left by Hitler as a country with no organization at all He said Great Britain alone could do very liitle to relieve conditions in Europe Although everything was being done to feed the people in the British occupation zone Bevin said it had to be balanced against the resistance of our people to the cutting of their supplies He said grain was being burned in the Argentine because of the lack of oil and that it would be common sense to send oilto Ar gentina in return for the grain inter venes More wheat must be supplied if a disaster is to be avoided this year the stocky foreign secretary added ISTC Women Students Protest Smoking Ban Cedar Falls to be provided with smoking rooms in each dormitory and in the com mons bundingmore than 100 women studajts at Iowa State Teachers collegestaged what they termed a strike Thursday Protesting present regulations which forbids women tosmoke on the campus the women gathered at the administration building anc marched tothe office of Dr Mal colm Price president Dr Price after talking with 3 spokesmen of the group said the question would be settled at a later meeting of the officers of the student league MIGHTY MO HOST TO NEW York ers at a rate of 12000 an hour swarmed aboard the mighty battleship U S S Missouri when the vessel opened to the public upon her arrival to take part in Navy day celebrations A portion of the huge throng which visited the siteof the formal surrender of Japan is shown above NO 15 Dr Ley Beats A Hied Justice BALLOTS CAST IN STRIKE VOTE Oma Hutchison a drill press operator at Highland Pack Detroit Mich plant of Chrysler corporation drops her marked baltot into box as other CIO automobile workers wait in line during early morning voting on strike issues AP Wirephoto Jj Strikes At a Glance By UNITED PRESS Approximately 193000 U S workers were away from their jobs as a result of strikes and shutdowns Friday The major disputes strike of maintenance workers forced cancellation of most American airlines passenger flights through Detroit and Chicago Thursdaj but service was partially restored when nonstrik ers took over CIO glass workers continued a walkout against 12 glass plants to protest a breakdown in contract negotiations Hollywood film capital was peaceful for the first ime in 33weeks as picket lines were withdrawn from the Warner Bros studio and strikers conferred on backtowork arrangements strike of 61000 west coast lumber workers continued with little prospect of an early settlement of the hourly mini mum wage issue AFL warehousemen continued to tie up shipping operations at the Houston Texport sumed negotiations with General Motors backed lip by anover whelming vote favoring strike action among rankandfile members Similar sentiment was expected in ballots from Thursdays Chrysler election Chrysler Employes Join GM Workers in Vote for Strike By UNITED PRESS Chrysler Corporation employes joined General Motors workers Friday in voting overwhelmingly for strike action to back pay de mands Approximately 193000 workers in other XT S industries stayed away from their jobs because of strikes and shutdowns Early returns from a national labor relations board poll con ducted in Chrysler plants Thursday showed the workers 20 to 1 in favor of a strike The vote requested by the United Auto mobile Workers Meanwhile New Englands big gest white collar strike in years began in Providence R I when 900 clerical employes of the Brown Sharpe Manufacturing Co walked out The strikers set up picket lines which 6100 mem bers of the Office Employes In ternational union AFL refused to cross The United Automobile Work ers armed with an over whelming vote of confidence from its membership resumed negotia tions with General Motors on de mands for a 30 per cent wage in crease Returns from elections in 97 GM plants showed a 6 to 1 ratio favor ing strike action A similar vote was expected with counting of ballots in Thursdays elections at Chrysler Corp plants In addition to support from rankandfile members the union entered negotiations amid signs of growing government inclination to grant increases to boost lowered peacetime wages President Truman said he would make public on Tuesday his long awaited reconversion wageprice policy expected to call for sub stantial wage hikes with some compensatory prices rises As government officials at tempted to stave off a system wide strike against the automo bile manufacturers work stop pages threatened other industries Eastern Greyhound bus em ployes prepared for a walkout next Wednesday 4 CIO maritime unions protested the assignment of merchant vessels to pleasure cruising and union leaders were authorized to take action at an opportune time against the na tionwide properties of Montgom ery Ward Co Amaintenance workers strike continued to upset American air lines flight schedules and walk outs remained in effect in the northwest lumber industry and against 12 LibbeyOwensFord and Pittsburgh Plate Glass Co plants The overall strike situation for the most part unchanged ex cept for isolated backtowork movements The total number of workers idled by strikes was 193 000 lowest in more than a month Trumans lonjrprom d reconversion program re portedly was based to a large ex tent on recommendations of cab inet members and top ecouumi advisers many of whom have said wages could be raised a much as 24 per cent withou forcing an increase in prices The National Association o Manufacturers Thursday nigh took issue with administration economists statements that in dustrys net profits in 1946 woulc be One top NAIi official assailed the estimate a the most cockeyed business fore cast ever made by responsibl persons In Hollywood strikers dis banded picket lines outside th Warner Bros studio but warnc that 30000 pickets would besieg the studio Saturday if a settlemen were not reached Senate Okays 2 North Iowa Postmasterships Washington senate ha approved the following nomina tions for postmasterships in nort Iowa Lpretta Staplelon Elma Grover B Chryst Forest City Weather Report FORECAST Mason cloudy an continued cool Friday night an Saturday with occasional show ers Low temperatures Frida night about 30 Iowa Partly cloudy and cold Fri day mostly cloudy Friday nigh and Saturday with occasiona light rain west porition Frida night and east portion Saturda Continued cool Minnesota Cloudy and cool wit light snow Friday night excep extreme south portion Part cloudy with snow flurries an colder Saturday Moderate strong shifting winds Saturda afternoon IN MASON CITY GlobeGazetteweather statistics Maximum Thursday 52 minimum Thursday 25 At 8 a m Friday 31 YEAR AGO Maximum 38 Minimum 28 50P Protests n Probe of Pearl Harbor Yunnan has signed an order republicans said Friday ives democratic members of the earl Harbor committee a tranglehold on the investigations ourse The order provides that wit esses and records may be sum noned only by majority action of he 10 member senatehouse Six members are demo rats At tlie same time the president ejected a proposal that individual ommittee members be permitted o interview prospective army and lavy witnesses and to look over fficial records Republican protests may ex ilode in the senate and house un ess some compromise is reached They are keeping silent now in he hope they may force approval 3f procedure similar to that of he senate war investigating com mittee When Mr Truman headed that ommiltee as a senator each member was free to poke into any government records he wanted to ee He could talk to anybody who might have information on the var program Then he could report to other members and if they decided an nvestigation was warranted it vas so ordered Senators said this system pro duced many worthwhile leads It has continued under the chair manship of Senator Mead D N Republicans helped draft an or der they hoped would permit its use by the Pearl Harbor commit tee Bat when William D Mitchell counsel for the Pearl Harbor odcr ito the white house Mr Truman diflnl sign it Republicanmembers have been particularly anxious that the in quiry committee take a look at an unpublished portion the naval nquiry boards report dealing with Japanese messages inter cepted after the riavy broke the Japanese diplomatic code in No vember 1941 Secretary of the Navy Forres al has urged that this portion of he report be kept secret Mem bers said it has not yet been mode available to the senatehouse committee which came into being 5 weeks ago Girl Recovers After Removal of Harmonica Chicago Liberty years old was reported rest ing comfortably at Edgewater hos pital Friday after the removal oi a 3inch harmonica from her stomach She swallowed the toy which measured of an inch in width several days ago and when efforts to remove it by instruments failed doctors decided upon an operation DR ROBERT LEY Cowards Death JAPANESE BALK ON ALLIED ORDER Reluctant to Obey Diplomatic Isolation Tokyo Japanese for eign office Friday showed reluc tance to obey General MacAr thurs unprecedented orders for the diplomatic isolation of Japan Dome agency quoted unnamed informed sources as reporting that the government would exercise great care in following the order but that foreign office officials would sound out allied authori ties on whether the directive conforms to thePotsdam declar ation MacArthur Thursday ordered Japan to transfet all of her dip lomatic and consular properties and archives everywhere in the world to the allied powers to cease relations with foreign gov ernments and to recall herdip lomatic and consular representa tives from abroadThe directive was prepared by the jointchiefs of staff in Washington The allies immediately after the cessation of hostilities had re quested Japan to cease relations with neutral powers At that time some quarters of the government expressed the opinionthat the re quest was inconsistent with the Potsdam pact Since the surrender Japan has maintained relations with Switz erland Sweden Portugal Eire Afganistan and the Holy See On the occupation front Mac Arthurs headquarters said that plans for fitting other allied troops into the setup await the conclu sion of policy discussions among the big powers then the receipt ol orders from Washington To date no official word has come through Buy your Victory Bonds ant Stomps from your GlobeGazette carrier boy SUGAR HOARD ABANDONED BY Javanese workman looks over this hoard of sugar abandoned by Japanese in Surabaya Java More than a million and a half tons have been found in Java It will be distributed among the United Nations AP Wirephoto NAZI CRIMINAL HANGS SELF IN NUERNBERGM Leaves Document on Apology for AntiSemitism Act Nuernberg IP Bullnecked ugubvious Dr Robert Ley one ime luxury loving chief of Hit ers labor front hanged himself n his cell Thursday night at the Vuernberg jail where he was waiting trial as a war criminal Col John Harlan Amen inter ogalion chief disclosed Friday fiat Ley had left a document en itled My Political Testimony vhich Amen said was a terrific polosy for his antiSemitism he message was directed to My icrman People Ley also left 2 other documents prepared in his cell One was a vill addressed to his children the ther a long discourse directed to lis 3 wives A spokesman said he ailed upon his last wife not to re marry because I know you love inly me His suicide may mean major hanges in preparations for the rial of the 22 other leading nazis ncarcerated there With the open ng of the trial just 24 days away eys death was believed to ex lude the use of certain documents with high value as evidence per aining only to the exlabor boss Ley was pronounced dead Thursday night after efforts to revive him failed The official an nouncement issued by Prison Commandant CoL C R Andrus of Denver Colo said the body was discovered by a sentinel who Became suspicious when Ley re mained seated motionlesV 1n cell for more than 2 minutes The sentinel called he prison er by name and received no an swer the announcement said They the guard and the corpor al of the guard entered the cell anil discovered Ley was on the oilet seat His mouth was stuffed ivitli rags torn from his under wear Around his neck was a icmmed edgeof a towel fastened t the top of the flush pipe of the toilet The guard called the prison officer LL Paul H Graven Mad son Wis who cut the prisoner down Ley had wet the towelling to make sure that the knot would not slip and had drawn the noose tight when he seated himself The luard who looked into the cell every 30 seconds could see only he prisoners knees Apparently Ley had planned his suicide long and carefully The 22 other topranking nazi defendants were not informed of Leys death He was buried early Friday in an unmarked grave Ley was indicted Oct 18 with 23 other defendants One of them Deputy Fuehrer Martin Bpnnann will be tried in absentia His whereabouts are unknown and he is believed to be dead The leader of the labor bund which operated under the slogan Strength Through Joy showed no emotion when he was served with the indictment in the base prison cell He requested counsel The indictment charged him on 3 the accession to power of the nazi conspirators war crimes and crimes against humanity A thousand feet of film part of which showed his activities as la bor boss has been prepared for the trial and the valne of the film as evidence now was in doubt Ley was captured by the IT S 101st airborne division near Berchtesgaden and he gave his name as Dr Ernst Distelmeyer When U S counterintelligence officers tried to question him he produced a vial and attempted to swallow its contents The officers knocked the vial from his hands He was identified at division headquarters by Frank X Schwartz nazi party treasurer and others A fanatical nazi Ley rose from the party ranks to a position of power as a Hitler lieutenant In his capacity as labor chief Ley ob literated labor unions ruthlessly and told all union members ex cept Jews they were automatical ly members of the labor front Those who protested either were killed or thrown into concentra tion camps He created the Strength Through Joy movement and oft en lectured women on the ad visability of bearing illegitimate children He also battled the Cath olic church and led the Teutonic Faith movement with which the nazis sought to supplant Chris tianity   

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