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Mason City Globe Gazette: Tuesday, October 2, 1945 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - October 2, 1945, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY AND OES MOINES I A Associated Press and United Preu Full Leased Wires THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS Five Cents a Copyjv MASON CITY IOWA TUESDAY OCTOBER Z 1945 HIS FATHER WAS John Stevenson of Los Angeles plants a kiss firmly on the cheek of his father Hyman Stevenson as the pair staged a reunion at Hamil ton Field Cal The excitement proved too much for dad who collapsed but was later revived Corporal Stevenson was one of some 80 liberated prisoners of war returned to the United States and tendered a celebration in San Fran cisco Administrative Error Put Liberated POWs on KP Duty Santa AnaCal administrative error which placed 49 soldiers liberated fromwar prisoner camps on K P duty at Santa Ana air base was corrected Tuesday Brig Gen Arthur E Easterbrook base commandant said Itis not the policy of this base liberated prisoners of war to doK Easterbrook said It fe bur policy toValfariUibem facility a grateful be stow The fact that some were on K P was an administrative error which have corrected With a shortage of personnel at the base returnees due for dis charge are given duty assign ments to accelerate theirown re lease Easterbrook explained Every day of duty a returnee performs puts him out of the army just one day sooner he said Easterbrook pointedout that less than 5 per cent of all re turnees are privates or privates first class thus noncommissioned officers above the grade of ser geant must sometimes handle K P duty 2 SHIPS BRING SOLDIERS HOME San Francisco Cal The following North Iowa soldi ers ar rived in harbor here recently on the Brazil T5 Srxxwell A Kyan MisonCityi Flril Lt BcrnetU Burr McGrtjcr Southern Minnesotans on this ship were Sgt Fettr S Rntjrs Sjl FjjinJr M SljJer Bloomlnr Pnirie T4 TCaiaq A Sandal Mapletan Arriving at Boston Mass on the Bienville Saturday was the following North lowan Pic Edtraril H Mlidorf AJrona MASOMITYAN ARRIVES IN N Y Pfc Glen J Smith Mason City was due to have arrived in New York Monday on the Ar gentina it was stated in an AP dispatch received here Tuesday Buy your Victory Bonds and Stamps from your GlobeGazette carrier boy ADD 105 IOWANS TOLTODE Des Moines hos tilities in World war 2 ended Aug 14the names of 105 more lowans who died in the conflict were added last month to the list now totaling 6982 kept by the war rec ords division of the state historical department Mrs Bessie Wilson who has kept the monthbymonth records since the war began said Tuesday the 105 added last month was the smallest monthly addition to the list since early in the ivar The number compared with 112 in Au gust and 202 in July Nearly all of the 105 were per sons who previously had been listed as missing in action and who were not found with the lib eration of many Japanese prison camps Mrs Wilson said Weather Report FORECAST Mason Tuesday night and Wednesday continued rather Tuesday night Warmer Wednesday Iowa Fair west and partly cloudy east Tuesday Clear and cold Tuesday night Wednesdaytan am warmer Minnesota Clear and continued coolTuesday night Increasing cloudiness and wanner Wednes day IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Monday 53 Minimum Monday 39 At 8 a m Tuesday 44 Precipitation 02 YEAR AGO Maximum 54 Minimum 46 Precipitation 03 This Paper Consists at Two Ono NO Ml PATTON LOSES COMMAND Ponder Plan for Oil Peace ALLIES DEMAND Famed General Is TEMPORARY 15 PER CENT PAY ADVANCEURGED Schwellenbach Asks Acceptance of Final Terms by Arbitrator Washington CIO oil work ers arid 11 big oil companies locked in controversy over wages Tuesday studied a government peace proposal calling 1 A temporary 15 per cent pay increase and 2 Ag reement by both sides to accept an arbitrators final settle ment Acceptance would bring an im mediate end to strikes which be gan Sept 16 and spread to 12 states Latest hit area is the west coast Pacific military and naval supplies thereby were jeopardized Secretary of Labor Schwellen bach presented the peace plan early Tuesday to weary negotia tors who acknowledged a hopeless deadlock after 7 days of concilia tion under government supervis ion Schwellenbach had to turn his attention elsewhere too as John L Lewiss soft coal miners added to government strike worries and troubles piled tip in the telephone auto and southern textile indus tries The government with papers already drawn for seizure action should the oil dispute continue to leave refineries idle prodded union and management represent atives o compromise on the CIO demands for 30 per cent higher Continuing that this strike continues on into the winter the people will be hungry and cold Schwellenbach suggested 1 Immediate return to work by the 36000 striking union mem bers and full resumption of op erations by management 2 Heturn to a 40 hour working schedule as soon as manpower availability permits With an in crease of 15 per cent or its equivalent in the basic pay rate 3 Agreement to accept the find Birthday Issue Washington birthday of the late President Roosevelt Jan 30 is an issue in the oil strike Daniel Pierce vice presi dent of the Sinclair Refining company said Tuesday the CIO oil workers want the birthdays of both the first and the last presi dents Washington and Roosevelt included as paid holidays The union now has 6 such holidays Pierce said Christmas New Years July 4 Labor day Memo rial day and Thanksgiving War Veterans at University Just Want to Be Left Alone Lincoln Nebr veterans enrolled at the University of Nebraska ust want to be Jeft alone The former servicemen taking advantage of the GI bill of rights do not consider themselves social or psychological problem cases They do not understand they said why anyone should fuss over them More than a score of the 364 studying in various colleges on the campus were interviewed All said they wanted to forget th to be as nearly as possible their fellow plain mister What do you have the most trouble with in the way of adjust ments they were asked The veterans agreed they find it hardest to grow used to the little things white shirts buying and talking civilian language Some are selfconscious of the difference between their ages and Oiose of regular upperclassmen whom they generally call the teenagers Normal conversation also pre sents difficulties to the former GJs Its not that we are the sflent type Paul Albro 21 Fair bury said Its just that in the army your interests are so vastly different than elsewhere It prob ably will take a little while to get briefed on civilian life again ings of an impartial arbitrator on the differences between the unions demand for 30 per cent and the companies counter offer of 15 The arbitrator would make his decision by December 1 In the meantime collective bargaining could be continued While Daniel T Pierce vice president of Sinclair Refining company said he would go along with the secretary other com pany representatives were non committal in advance of a meet ing to draft a formal reply O A Knight president of the union said the plan would be passed upon by the executive board and negotiating committee and its position likewise would be disclosed first to Schwellenbach While the oil dispute was in perhaps its most crucial stage Lewis soft coal miners gave gov ernment officials new jitters with indications of a widespread strike in the making Operators rejected the United Mine Workers invitation to dis cuss a walkout The producers said trie men should go back to work first Lewis remained silent The foremens strikes Monday spread to ISO mines that normal ly turn out 350000 tons of coal daily and William Blizzard presi dent of district 17 said West Vir within the next few days The solid fuels administration ordered coal shipments consigned to eastern steel mills diverted to gas utility plants Gas is used for cooking and people must eat the SFA said Steel mills have no larger stockpiles than the gas utilities but pressure must be kept up for safety reasons the agency added Some railroad coal reserves were reported down to 15 days r j ittrj 3fC ll as the strikes spread to the south some of the ern Appalachian region AGCOUNTINGON5enfto 15th Army NIPPRODUCTION FIRST RUBBER SINCE PEARL nations first shipment of crude Eearl Har bor produced in the Philippines secretly during the war is shown above in part being unloaded at San Francisco The Japs had taken over the 2500acre plantation destroyed its machinery and forced employes to flee Loyal Filipinos hid ing in the hills and using makeshift methods managed to store up tons of crude rubber ready for shipment when MacArthur returned Sessions AffuSehts Mat Agreements on Major Issues London The council foreign ministers concluded its sessions Tuesday A terse statement on the 3 weeks of work which were punc tuated by several heated contro versies said only that the coun cil had decided to terminate its Present session A further statement was ex pected later which might disclose the degree of success orfailure of the deliberations of the foreign ministers of the United States Russia Great Britain France arid China The United States delegation promised a statement within a few hours Some diplomats speculated that the foreign ministers had decided to toss the conference problems to the heads of state of the Big Three governments Earlier informants closer to the councU said Foreign Commissar V M Molotov threatened to go home Sunday after a sharp argu ment with British Foreign Secre tary Ernest Bevin The 2 have tjeen reported at loggerheads frequently during sessions which were drawing to ward a close The representatives of the United States Russia Great Britain France and China met more than 2 hours Tuesday mom ing and reconvened for another session later It seemed that even the most superficial agreement could not be reached Molotov was reported by per sons present at the weekend ex change to have taken exception to a remark by Bevin that the so viet commissars methods were Hitlerian The clash resulted when Molo tov demanded that the ministers revoke a decision of Sept 11 on procedure which permitted France and China to sit in on all discussions This is the issue which had deadlocked the conference for more than a week with Russia in sisting that the Potsdam decisions be adhered to with only the for eign minister of the big 3 discuss ing and drafting peace treaties for the Balkan states The report was that Molotov said in effect that when the group of powers reached an agreemen in common and that afterwards one or more realized their mis take the council should re sider and repeal the decision To this Bevin was understood to have said he had never hear anything more like Hitlerian methods Persons present said Bevins remarks were translated into French and Russian while the ministers sat tense and waited for an explosion It was reported reliably tha1 nothing more had been accom plished in the latest session and that bitterness anger and impati ence were increasing steadily the conference to an end almos overshadowed its failure in th past 3 weeks to reach any impor tant agreement U S Army Doctors Reveal Togo Isnt Faking Heart Attack Frankfurt on the Main Germany was offieial y announced Tuesday that Gen George S Fatten Jr who differed with Gen Eisenhower over denazification policies in Bavaria had been relieved of command of the famed 3rd army heled through France He will take over the 15th army which is reduced now to a paper organization The 15th which completed its job as an occupation army A CmUlK T jwv III y in July now consists of a headquarters staff and a few Tokyo mounted troops doing research work imong Japanese Tuesday for top obattpm reorganization of their cabinet by the time demobilization s completed in midOctober and general MacArthur demanded a iull accounting of Japans military production as well as existing itocks of war materiel He asked the Japanese govern ment for full information on the annual production of arms ord unce ammunition and automo tive equipment from 1941 through August 1945 plus estimates for the remainder of 1945 Japanese sources reported a rising sentiment for elimination from the cabinet of ministers once associated with the beaten war making regime as well as those blamed for failure to anticipate growing food housing and fuel shortages Earlier with out hinted that Emperor Hirohito might ab dicate in a thorough government housecleaning when his task of carrying out the principal sur render terms is finished Army doctors Tuesday reported that former Premier Shigenori Togo suspected warcriminal isnt faking he does have a heart attack and consequently his ap pearance at U S Eighth army prison has been delayed Allied occupation authorities continued their search lor hidden gold silver and currency which the Japanese wartime administra tions commanders plun deredin the nations they overran In Shanghai MayorChienTa Chen said thewar loot of Japanese and Germans in Shanghai would be seized by his administration and returned to its owners even though it had been transferred to Swiss and Portuguese He added aJ a press conference that the 2400 Germans in Shanghai would be placed in a restricted area and the pronazis and Japanese collabor ators among them screened out and arrested The Tokyo newspaper Mainichi raid Tuesday that new loud de mands for a less tainted more en ergetic government may force Premier Prince HigashiKuni to shuffle the cabinet even before the end of demobilization set for about Oct 15 Wellinformed Japanese sources said HigashiKuni himself might resign in the face increasing criticism of his governments fail ure to formulate a concrete plan to alleviate the shortages of hous ing and fuel before the rapidly approaching winter CONGRESSVOTES ROAD PROGRAM Washington voted an immediate start Tuesday on a federalstate high way construction program house legislation declaring the end of hostilities permits begin i program previously author war years ice were increasing steadily Senate passage was by voice Actually the task of bringing vote Congress still has to appro x tTrtf I xjignin ar priate the necessary funds carrier boy r GENERAL PATTON Deployment Timetable Paris redeploy ment timetable of U S army di visions One hundred sixth infantry 5th and 1th armored On high seas Seventieth Infantry In United i awaiting shipment Oct program Tenth armored In Marseille Senate passage sent to the white staJng srea awaiting shipment j aixteemh armnrpd i i Lucian K Truscott Jr commanding the 5th army which for official dissolution Dec 1 will succeed Patton in command m Olthe eastern half of the American occupaUon zone The changes will take place about Oct 7 J jAlthough no official reason was given for the transfer of the washbuckling pistol packing atton it came on the heels of his videly criticized statement to newsmen Sept 22 that some nazis should remain in office for the sake of better administration this winter This was in conflict with Eis inhowers stand for immediate jlimination of all nazis from of fice in line with the Potsdam declaration Tuesdays announcement was rom headquarters of U S forces n the European theater It came about 4 hours after Associated ress Correspondent Edward D Ball quoted a reliable Berlin iource to the effect that Pattons transfer was imminent Head quarters said On Sept 29 Gen Eisenhower notified Patton that he would be transferred on or about Oct 1 to take command of the 15th army and to head the theater general board and that Lt Gen Lucian K Truscott would take command of the 3rd army and the eastern military district This transfer will be made as ordered Oct 7 Eisenhowers action came one day after Patton summoned from his Bad Toellz headquarters to report on his stewardship of Ba varia spent more than 2 hours at Frankfurt conferring with his chief r Even before his remarks to which he used an unfortunate analogy comparing nazis and antinazis to democrats and republicans in the United States Pattens administration had been under investigation as an outgrowth of charges that nazis were being kept in office Several high German adminis trators including Friedrich Schaeffer minister president of Bavaria have been removed as a result of the investigation Oieither Patton nor his aides could be reached at his Bad To eltz headquarters for comment Newsmen have been unable to see the general since he returned from his Frankfurt conference with Eisenhower The 15th army does not control any occupation area Its mission is to prepare reports on allied re lations in the war with recom mendations for future procedure At present it is a paper army It was announced July 21 that the 15th had completed its job as an occupying force and that the commander at that time Lt Gen Leonard T Gerow had beeri named president general of a board of American officers to make a detailed study of the European war Blind Vets to Attend World Series Menlo Park Cal world series at Detroit was the destination Tuesday of 10 veterans of them totally blind the other 6 only partially Their enthusiastic attendance at local games despite their handi cap caused them to be specially selected from among the other pa tients of the blind rehabilitation program at Dibble hospital here The army is paying plane trans portation and the San Francisco Examiner other expenses Accompanying the party are 3 trained to work with blind patients to help overcome the special problems which confront them All are enlisted men They in clude Ralph Andres 27 Har dy Nebr and Staff Sgt Karl Waggoner 31 Eagle Grove Iowa Sixteenth armored Arriving Le Havre staging area to ship about Oct 5 Ninth armored First elements seas Remainder Eighth armored At Camp Ok lahoma City in assembly area command Thirtysixth 66th 75th 79lh 12th armored and 16th Alerted for movement Investigation Finds Jewish Conditions Better ginias 108000 miners mfzht be arl Gl Harrison an official idle within the next few days investigator in a for By JOHN B McDERMOTT United Press Correspondent Feldafins Bavaria Jews are living 12 to 40 to a room in this displaced persons camp but they ridiculed charges that their lot was almost as bad as it had been in nazi concentra tion camps The charges had been made by Earl G Harrison an official mal report to President Truman He described the camps as filthy unsanitary inefficient arid behind barbed wire We found neither barbed wire nor gestapolike guards at this camp The majority of Jews live m tileroofed bleak apartments wellprotected from the cold Though crowded up to 40 in a room all sleep on bunks They living inhabi g better than itants of New Yorks east side slums or many factory States districts in the United They perhaps are not getting all the food they want but their daily diet of 2600 calories is twice that of the average German Despite Harrisons charges to the contrary the camp appeared wellfixed medically Hundreds of Jews are beins nursed back to the health they lost in concentration camps About 20 per cent of the 4300 inmates have some form of tuberculosis but a Jewish doctor said most were recovering Redbearded Rabbi Ezekial Ruttner told newsmen who flew here for a sjurprise inspection Things have been better for the Jews since our liberation Now is seems even more things are be ing done to make things better This camp perhaps was not the worst example of those condemn ed by Harrison but neither was it the best We picked it at ran dom when Lt Gen Walter B Smith Gen Dwight D Eisenhow ers chief of staff offered to fly us to any detention camp we chose We arrived home within 2 hours of the time we made our hardly time enough for the camp to bewarned and tidied for in spection Eisenhower himself visited this and other Bavarian camps 2 weeks ago and immediately ordered the military governor of Bavaria Gen George S Patton to seize neigh boring German dwellings to re lieve congested conditions for the Jews Until Eisenhowers visit it was apparent that Patton took little personal interest in Jewish wel fare here Col James H Polk of El Paso Texas the camp com mander admitted that the heat had been turned on only in the past 2 weeks Pok could not recall having re ceived any specific directives Monday hac and seemec conditions until after Eisenhow ers visit Since then he said I have been getting orders fired at me so fast that I have been unable to keep up with them He said Patton visited the camp pleased vith the results Edward Richeson UNRRA di rector at the camp supported the armys claim that the Jewish camps were being improved rap idiy and would be well prepared for winter Rabbi Ruttner summed up the inmates viewpoint with We are still living in a camp We are without a place we can call home We hope the doors o the world will open to some land where we can live to Des Moines gether in peace Until then we are of Iowa City i WAJhIA VllCTli WC dll making the best of it here wher VOTERS FAVOR NEW TOWN HALL Dougherty Residents Approve by Over 21 at Dough erty Monday decided by a vote of 55 to 22 to construct a new town hall On the question of a bond Is sue of to construct the building the vote was 55 in favor and 28 opposed Dean Buchanan Named Head of Advisory Group Des Moines R E Buchanan of Iowa State college has been named chairman of the Iowa department commissions technical advisory committee Seth Barker of Ottumwa chair man of the commission said Tuesday Prof A C Trowbridge of the University of Iowa will act as vice chairman of the committee Barker said Other committee members in cluded Harley Wilhelm Edgar L Barger Dr W F Loehwing Dr H H Plagge Dr Ralph Dewey and Dr W H Pierre of Ames Fred Schwob and A L Wieters of and L C Crawford The committee will advise the iJIC tolHlnulee WIH aavise the conditions are improving all the commission on matters of techni cal development Barker said   

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