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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: August 30, 1945 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - August 30, 1945, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY AND ARCHIVES OES MOlNES I A u UOcuid Proa and United THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBOR MASON CITY IOWA TUUBSDAY AUGUST 30 1945 taptr consiMot Two Sec NO 27J MACARTHUR IN YOKOHAMA TRUMAN CLAIMS AILOFCOUNTRY SlS RESPONSIBLE Congressmen Clamor for More Inside on Pearl Harbor Probe Washington fP President Truman declared Thursday he thought the whole country as much as any individual was re sponsible lor the Pearl Harbor disaster Mr Truman told a news con ference he had no objection to a court martial but didnt intend to order one The president acknowledged that he had made a statement which was not a statement of fact about Pearl Harbor while he was in the senate In a maga article last fall Mr Tru man had said the army and navy commanders at the Pacific bastion were not on speaking terms A reporter reminded him of that Thursday Grinning Mr Truman remarked that things come back to haunt you The army and navy were ready Thursday to close the books on Pearl Harbor But congress kept the furor over Americas great est naval disaster going with de mands for courts martial and more inside information Chairman Elbert D Thomas CD Utah of the senate military com mittee remained silent pending talks with war department of ficials But Chairman May Joined a conplt republican mem Bers of thehouse militarycotn linittee in clamoring for injiitarjr j trial to fix responsibility for what happened Dec 7 1941 when Ji pan destroyed or crippled a major segment of the Pacific fleet The documents brought sharply Into focus a number of points previously unknown or obscured for 1 Kimmel was advised by Ad niral Harold Stark then chief of laval operations on Nov 24 1941 a surprise aggressive lent in any direction including Jn attack on the Philippines or ruam is a possibility Z A diary ot Secretary Stimson lid the late President Roosevelt declared at a white house confer ence November 25 that Japan might attack by December I 3 Secretary Hull gave the Jap anese a IDpoint counterpro posal to their peace suggestions on November 26 and the army in quiry board said this touched the button of war 4 Stark sent Kimmel next day a message which was relayed to Short It said Consider this dis patch a war warning It added that Japan was expected to make an aggressive move within a few days and that an amphibious ex pedition against either the Philip pines Thai or Kra peninsula or possibly Borneo is indicated There was no mention of Pearl Harbor but Kimmel was told to execute a defensive deployment 5 On the same day Marshall notified Short that hostile action was possible any moment and that this country desired that Ja pan commit the first overt act It ordered reconnaissance activi ties but not of a type to alarm civilians It also said U S policy was not to be construed as re stricting Short to action that might jeopardize your defense 6 Short reported the next day he had put into effect an anti sabotage alert 7 Kimmel conferred with his ieet intelligence officer on Dec 2 and noted and commented on the absence of information on 4 Jap anese carriers They were part of the 6 in the task force already headed for Hawaii 8 Stark wired Kimmel on Dec 3 that Japanese diplomatic and consular posts at Hong Sinirapore Batavia Washington and London had been ordered to destroy most codes and ciphers and burn secret documents 9 Apparently the United States had cracked a Japanese code for Stimson said the war department received information on Dec 6 on Japans reply to American settlement overtures would be and that the answer indicated an immediate severance ot diplo malic relations Marshall did not receive word of this until the following morn ing Then he messaged Short by commercial radio saying the Jap anese were presenting what amounted to an ultimatum at noon central war time The message reached Honolulu 22 minutes before the attack on Pearl Harbor began but it wasnt decoded and delivered to the ad jutant general until 7 hours and Meat Ration Point Value Is Reduced RECONVERSION ATAGLANCE Biiger meat butter cheese ra tions start Sunday 2000000 war workers laid off since VJday Ocean travel will open up iii 6 months Washington The climb fa ward better living got a boost Thursday OPA starting Sunday is handing out more meat more cheese more butter But the war manpower com mission said in a more sobering announcement that 2000000 war workers have lost their jobs since Japans fall Some however have been rehired already Otherwise the from in dustry and government alike was good It ran like this 1 Within 5 months travel by ship across the ocean may be fair ly easy Within a year regular world cruises 2 Farmers will give industry a rich market Surveys show 1 in 4 wants a tractor or other machine 1 in 5 a car or truck 3 Courtesy behind the counter is coming back say along with deliveries easier cred it and prewar store services Canned milk becomes ration free on Sunday And red points wilt buy about 28 per cent more meat 50 per cent more cheese 25 per cent more butter and margarine fats and oils were unchanged Beef steaks and roasts went down to 3 points a pound ham burger and bacon 2 points lamb and veal 1 to 3 points and pork chops steaks and roasts 1 to 2 points ration note OPA indicated tires might be ra tioned longer than most people think Dealers first must build up stocks and wipe out their back log of unfilled requests from es sential drivers Otherwise a gen eral rush would wipe out stocks and leave the essential people un able to get tires U DISCHARGED AT ARMY CENTER The north Iowa soldiers listed below were recently discharged at the army separation center at Jef ferson Barracks Mo S Sgt Max A Hansen Clarion S Sgt Donald W Hanna Clear Lake Sgt Wayne P Solmonson Es therville Dale V Brown Dumont Sgt Vance E Benson Forest City Cpl Dale Doore Greene Pfc Glenn D Gaskill Lake Mills Pvt Leland G Debolt Mason City S Sgt Frederic H Wall Ma son City Fenlon A Lynch Mason City Cpl Adelbert E Young Nora Springs Pfc Eugene W Dempsey Oel wein S Sgt Richard G Walker Oel wein Cpl Orlie M Stagman West Bend Buy your War Bonds and Stamps from your GlobeGazette carrier boy a destroyer submarines The task 3 minutes after the fighting started 10 The Japanese began train ing for the strike in July or Aug ust in their home waters They nsed 6 carriers Z fast battleships 2 heavy cruisers one light cruiser division and some force assembled at Tankan bay at Etorofu island in north Japan and sailed Nov 27 or 28 taking a northerly route south of the Aleutians with orders to destroy even Japanese ships that sighted the fleet It turned south toward Oahu and launched some 300 of its ap proximately 424 planes from 300 to 250 miles out 11 The intelligence officer of the Pacific fleet declared later that had American forces inter cepted he thought they would have taken the licking of their life Fleet units at Pearl Harbor he said would have been unable to have brought the enemy under gunfire because our battleships were too slow and the remainder of the force probably would have suffered severe damage if not de feat because of the superior Jap anese air power The navy he added could have mustered only 180 planes against thevtask force I 48 BOYS STILL AT LARGE AFTER ELDORA ESCAPE Violence Marks Trail of 179 Youths Who Fled Training School Eldora Iowa UP Violence marked the trail Thursday of 48 boys remaining at laige after a riot and wholesale escape from the state training school for boys here Of 179 who fled from the un willed unfenced institution fol lowing an apparently prearranged disturbance in the dining1 room at noon Wednesday 131 were re ported by Assistant Superintend ent Darrel T Brown to have been recaptured or to have returned peaceably First report of violence came from Union 3 miles south of here where Town Marshal Grellet Dil lon 65 ivas attacked by 4 of the escapees who later fled Dillon suffered a broken nose and severe hemorrhages and was replaced on his beat by armed citizens Three of the boys were captured early Thursday atMarshalltown about 30 miles southeast of here when a car they had stolen cracked up in a residential dis trict One the trio William Flynn 18 of Perry was injured slightly Another boycaptured Wednes day night with a rifle in his pos session told authorities he ob tained the weapon when he broke Into a farm house Automobiles were reported stolen from several nearby farms A wide search of the country side Was being continued by school officials agents of thestate bureau of criminal investigation arid state highway patrolmen Brown said routine at the insti tution had returned virtually to normalcy Brown said he received a tip 10 minutes before the escape that the attempt would be made He called Sheriff J E Davidson of Hardin county who arrived at the school in time to see the boys storm by attendants to the win dows of the dining room The boys then kicked and pushed out wire screens and dropped some 12 feet to the ground The riot was a climax to a day of unrest following the death of Ronald Miller 17 Des Moines from heat prostration Tuesday Miller as a result of disciplinary action had been assigned with other boys to wheeling coal and working in an Eldora canning plant A postmortem examination of Millers body was planned by school authorities following re ports from several sources that he was beaten E J Audrle undertaker told reporters Millers thighs and arms bore traces of a recent beat ing by a wooden implement The riot which authorities said apparently was planned occurred in the dining room It started of ficials said when one group of the 538 boy inmates overturned a table and began throwing dishes against the wall Others took the same action and in a short time the boys began fleeing from the building Observe Anniversary Ottumwa naval avia tion Thursday observed its 32nd anniversary the naval air station here reported it had trained 5156 cadets since it was commissioned Weather Report FORECAST Mason City Generally fair and continued hot and humid Thurs day Thursday night and Friday Maximum temperatures Thurs day in mid 90s Iowa Generally fair Thursday and Thursday night Friday partly cloudy with scattered thundcrshowers in west and ex treme north Minnesota Partly cloudy Thurs day night with scattered thun der showers west portion Con siderable cloudiness with scat tered thunder showers Friday No important change in tem perature IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Wednesday 91 Minimum Wednesday 61 At 8 a m Thursday 65 YEAR AGO Maximum 75 Minimum 65 Precipitation 02 V North Iowa Fair Stock Barns Full Activity at the North Iowa fair grounds swung into the final stretch Thursday as north cen tral Iowas biggest agricultural show began setting up for a 4day exposition opening Friday after noon on Golden Wedding day All persons married 50 years will be admitted free to the grandstand this one afternoon when the fairs featured horse show and vaudeville attractions will be shown Thursday some 200 4H club members began arriving with their stock garden and canningexhib its AH exhibits this year will be in the stock barns and smaller exhibit buildings One of the larg est shows in 10 years is expected A huge tent has been staked out west of the grandstand en trance for exhibits formerly shown in flora hall As yet this building cannot be used for fair purposes but may be back in use by next season More race horseswere arriving Thursday direct from other fairs and the saddle and driving horses to be shown in the horse show on opening day Friday were already stabled at the grounds The North Iowa fairs horse show which is having its first presentation this year on opening day is built around events of in terest to fanners and horse own ers The 2 largest classes re the owners pleasure class and the stock horses In the owners class amateurs will be driving their own horses while in the stock horse class farmers and owners will work their horses under stock horse rules for Iowa Sixteen horses have been entered in each event Another favorite event of the horse show will be the musical chair Twelve horses have been entered in this event There will be 3 and 5 gaited horses there as well but the entry list is not ns large in these classes since they fall in the class of the profes sional horse show and are not usually associated with fair pro grams All show and race horses are stabled on the north side of the track Exhibition horses art quar tered in the horse barns near the other buildings And the track is working up in fine condition ac cording to drivers The first trucks ot the William T Collins shows arrived Thurs day and work of salting up the midway progressed during the afternoon Although stock exhibits are limited to 4H class some fine ex hibits are arriving at the grounds I Garden exhibits and canned I goods are shown in both 4H and open class thisyear Ernie Youngs state fair stage ABOVECHAMPION K A C owned by Frank Beasley Fairdale NT Dak and driven by B J Sehue Jamestown N Dak was cliampioh racer in 1941 winning 16 outof18 racesHe isa 9yearoldnever outof the money in his life In 1941 lie set a record Spencer of on a quarter mile track This was equalled at Monroe Wis and at Portage Le Prairie Mani toba Canada to set the Western Canadian record that same year Driver B J Schue is telling Ralph Newman 816 N Connecticut youthful admirer a few points about the horse while John McGraw groom at the right adds Ins 0 K to the story Dr Baker is one of a number of fast horses now quartered at the racing stables at the fair grounds ANDERSON Golden Hill goes on to the track at the North Iowa fairgrounds Satur day to compete with fast horses for a sizable purse he will have the whole Anderson family cheering for him The Andersons race horses as a hobby taking their vacation during the fair season The remainder of the year Mr and Mrs Eskel Anderson Ortonville Minn operate a hatch ery Golden Hill a 4yearold colt will start in the pace here It will be his 6th stall this he has been first or a contender in every start Left to right in the picture of Golden Hill are Marietta Yvonne Berna dette Dale and Elaine with Mrs Eskel Anderson on the sulky Lock photos K A Engr show is expected to arrive Friday in time for the first showing of this huge extravaganza on Friday evening Entrance to the grounds is Iree this year with only a 25 cent charge for parking cars Car en trances will be at loth street and S Federal avenue and on 19th S W The front entrance will be used for pedestrians only Police will be on duty day and night directing traffic at the 3 entrances Lines have been marked on Federal avenue for pedestrians to cross to the grounds And slow signs have been placed to warn motorists Buy your War Bonds and Stamps from your GlobeGazette carrier boy No Paper Monday No editions of the Globe Gazette will be distributed Monday Labor day To avoid a break in the con tinuity of the comics Mon days releases will be print ed along with Saturdays in the Saturday issue The omission of the La bor day paper is prompted by 2 considerations 1 our dwindling supply of print paper 2 a wish to give our employes o bit of the re laxation they missed when workers elsewhere were celebrating the yictory over Japan For them the occa sion meant added hours of labor llth Airborne Moves Into Big Nip City Yokohama While Japanese roops guarded the highway a Jattalion of 750 men of the llth airborne division moved into and occupied this 6th city of Japan Thursday afternoon The move was accomplished so imspectaculrly that even Nip onese citizens exhibited little in terest as the convoy of 40 trucks rumbled the 15 miles from the Alsugi airstrip to their posts alone he seaside road Yokohamas main drive which borders the big port serving Tokyo There they found the white tone American consulate build ing undamaged by air raids It was in charge of the Swiss caretaker Jacob Kern and his wife Annie Kern greeted the troops warm ly He told newsmen that damage and casualties inflicted by the B29s was equal to that of the 1923 earthquake although the gov ernment had not released the casualty figures Japanese citizens perhaps still dazed were inscrutable in their to the Americans Only the little children smiled the smaller the child the bigger the smile The Japanese went about their business unconcernedly casting no more than a casual glance at their conquerors Most of the business houses of Yokohama were closed A few fac tories were operating Enroute to Yokohama the Yanks could see much of the damage in flicted by the B29s At least half of the industrial area of the city was nothing but rubble and rusting sheet metal which natives were using to con struct crude shelters The railroads were operating but every plant appeared at least partially destroyed Several blocks in the heart of the city itself were badly hit The bombing was couldnt stand much more was the sole comment of residents The Japanese guards were spaced at intervals of 100 yards along the highway from Atsugi to Yokohama evidently to prevent sniper activity and to keep citi zens from lining the road Some of them were veterans of Pacific combat judging from battle rib bons they wore Men women and especially children peered curiously from behind shutters at the Americans Some even ventured to wave timidly On the whole the occupation was uneventful The battalion camped along Sea side road while General Mac Arthur and officers took rooms at the new Grand Hotel Yokohama finest overlooking the harbor Correspondents were billeted blocks away at the Bund hotel PORT OF TOKYO HEADQUARTERS SITE FOR ALLIES MacArthur Announces Japan Occupation Going Splendidly Atsugi Airfield Near Tokyo MacArthur arrived in apan and set up headquarters in Yokohama as Nippons military ruler Thursday amidst the first alien armed forces ever to oc upy the sacted islands Paratroopers and seaborne and sailors handpicked to Nippon of the invasion of he Philippines swarmed out of he skies and in from the sea in in unbroken stream They took over Atsugi airfield IB miles from Tokyo ran up the American flag over Yokosuka naval base Japans second larg est rode by Japanese truck into Yokohama pert of Tokyo where he occupation force will estab ish general headquarters and JCgan evacuating prisoners of rom a black hell hole where bestial beatings were common The occupation is going splendidly MacArthur s a i d Yanks were moving in an orderly fashion without bloodshed and he said the Japanese appeared to be acting in good faith The occupation by troops in full battle dress and ready for any contingency was 8 hours old when MacArthur stepped onto At sugi airdrome from his fihiniriff silver C54 transport Bataan at 2 p m midnight central war Truman Asks LendLease Written Off Washington resident Truman notified congress Thurs day that the more than 000000 this country spent on lendlease aid to its allies should in the main be written off the books The clear in a lengthy report Mr Truman sent to capitol that the admin istration believes the United States received 3 things more im portant than a dollar basis settle ment They are 1 Victory over Germany and Japan 2 M o r e than through last March in reverse lendlease 3 A commitment from all na tions receiving lendlease to join in organizing postwar internation al trade on the basis of lowering barriers In a letter accompanying the re port Mr Truman told the law makers With the defeat of the axis powers whose ruthless plan for world conquest and enslavement came so close to succeeding the United States has realized the ma jor objective for which lend lease aid has been extended The president has ordered lend lease operations halted effective VJ day and already has cut off requisitions for supplies which formerly would have been ordered under the mutual aid program Buy jour War Bonds and Stamps from your GlobeGazette carrier boy BELIEVE NAZI LEADER ALIVE London Russian spoke man said Thursday that Martin Bormann Adolf Hitlers deputy and second most posverful man in nazi Germany was believed stil at large Maj Gen I T Nikitchenko soviet representative on the united national prosecuting committee disclosed that the allies have dis missed reports of Bormanns death as unfounded Speculation over Bormann whereabouts was touched off by his inclusion Wednesday night among the 24 German war crim inals ordered to trial at Neuern berg by the United Slates Britain France and Russia At first it was thought that his appearance on the mass indict ment might mean that he already had been captured by the allies as have all other 23 defendants Nikitchenko said however that Bormann was not in soviet hands nor so far as he knew in the cus tody of any of the allied powers He pointed out however that the charter establishing the war crimes tribunal permitted trials in absentia The soviet spokesman declined comment on why Bormann was included on the indictment list while Adolf Hitler was not Hit lers body never has been found supreme landed amidst cheering para troopers of the llth airborne di vision who began pouring from an unending stream of transports at 6 a m 4 p m Wednesday cen tral war time simultaneous with landings at Yokosuka led by the fourth marine regiment The fourth marines rushed to the Philippines from China were one of tie heroic outfits in the fight for Manila bay and stood to the last on CorrcRidor Thursdays landing was by a reacti vated regiment The Htli airborne division helped MacArthur clear 300000 Japanese out of the Philippines and were victors at Nichols field where Japan struck its first blow at the islands Paralroop units drove in Japa nese trucks duly saluted by ene my officers to occupy Yokohama 5 miles closer to Tokyo than Yo kosuka This was the first step to ward a juncture between the sea anil airborne forces whose origi nal landings were made 18 miles apart on cither side of Miura pen insula Both air and sea forces were covered in typical battle fashion by the ready but silent guns of an allied war fleet anchored in Tokyo bay and swarms of planes ranging from fighters to Supcr forls In a coordinated mercy opera tion 4 ships began evacuating the first of 3o000 prisoners ot war in Japan including 8000 Americans Simultaneously 134 Superforts parachuted 536 tons of supplies to internment camps thai wont be reached for days or possibly weeks by occupation forces Among the first 500 rescued from a prisoner hospital near Yoko suka was Maj Gregory Pappy Boyington marine air hero of the South Pacific who was shot down over Rabaul nearly 20 months ago Many of the 50 most of them suffering from malnutrition open wounds fractures concussions and burns were loaded aboard the hospital ship Benevolence and the transport Reeves The cruiser San Juan and transport Gosselin were also in he mercy force which was under orders from Rear Adm Robert C Carney to take a couple of thousand to night Thursday initial occupation by 18150 armed Americans and Brit ish will be followed by major oc cupation Gth and 8lh armies which helped MacArthur fulfill his pledge to return to Ma nila StcelHclmetcd Gen Jo scph M Swing led his llth divi sion paratroopers from Okinawa the first to An American war crimes como Atsusr He the first to mission spokesman confirmed that touch Japan as the creates mass Bormann had not been captured ar transport of the Pacific got un by American occupation forces and said lie had been assured by British war office sources that the suspect was not in British custody American Investigators in Eur ope were reported to have uncov ered evidence recently indicating that Bormann was still alive dervvay An unending stream of C54 transports each carrying 40 man loads landed on the 5600 foot runway at 3 minute intervals with clocklike regularity disgorging 7500 paratroopers garbed in bat tle green and fully armed MacArthur called the cheers and   

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