Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Mason City Globe Gazette: Wednesday, August 22, 1945 - Page 1

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - August 22, 1945, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME OF AND ARCHIVES HO I t A THE NEWSPAPER THAT Associated PKS and United Press mil MASON crry IOWA WEDNESDAY AUGPST zz MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS OB m f mt v j Tires Nylon Stockings Soon MOTORISTSMAY GET TIRE BREAK WITHIN 90 DAYS Nylon Stockings and Radios Expected on Shelves by Christmas RECONVERSION ATAGLANCE news on ires nylons Good radios WPB scrapping controls on ma terials New goods at 1942 thinks Washington tires ny lon stockings new radios The government dropped good news about all 3 into American laps Wednesday Government officials were care ful not to speak of an end to ra tioning But they said motorists might set a break on new tires within 90 days They predicted production might jump 100 per cent in the next 3 months That would mean a lot more tires for civilians OPA officials said they thought they could hold most of the new peacetime it reaches the stores or near1942 prices But they have a fight on their jiands Manufacturers contend that 1945 production costs demand higher than 1942 prices Nylon stockings mar be back In circulation by Thanksgiving or at least by Christinas The govern ment has turned loose Its controls on nylon and rayon WPB saTd 3J4 million radios may be on Jhe store shelves by Christmas This was a surprise The reason An 80 per cent cut m military orders for radar and Injunctions Against 9 for Violating Meat Rationing cracking down Wednesday tioning Names of the 9 men and the amounts of meat found in their possession for which OPA says no red points were surrendered are Dr E E Chappell Clear Lake 240 pounds of beef A A Dun lavey 522 N Jefferson 400 pounds of beef ieo Donnelly 328 8th N W 394 pounds of beef H W Koeneke 507 S Vermont 130 pounds of pork P A Larson 623 S Jersey 108 pounds of pork R N McCarron 714 N Adams beef Netcott o 132 2nd S E 08 pounds of pork Glen Davis 2626 19th S W 109 pounds of pork and the Hev Cart J Sentman 931 N Monroe 130 pounds of pork The injunctions were siTied Wednesday morning by Judge Henry N Graven of the federal district court They were signed according to Walter D Kline dis trict OPA director after OPA en forcement officials had obtained proof of rationing violations by the individuals named The meat was found in private lockers The persons enjoined must now pay back to the OPA in monthly installments the number of red points represented by the meat in their possession Quisling Hysterical at Trial for Treason Quisling became hysterical at his treason trial sent Adolf ion in the greater German reich to a series of questions regarding a J and a memorandum he had drafted Rent ceilings are expected to disappear soon in certain places for example In areas where army camps close or war plants shut down and people move away OPA indicated meat points would be reduced beginningnext month Agriculture Secretary An igrson already has said meat ra would end soon SSB said it would scrap its plicated network of controls materials and set priorities by the end of 1 the con trolled materials over board This was the governments 10 1940 complaining thathe had not received the promised fi nancial support lor his part in the German occupation of Nor way control over aluminum steel copper and Sumber The government told business men to build all the new factories plants and additions they could Controls on building were taken but the government still kept some materials like y Chairman J A Krug said Fthe tight supply lum ber and other building materials ease off soon as military demands slacken and more men are available for work1 Enough new insecti rid a house mosquitoes and flies and otherpests for a year At SIISO to a year The U S public health service made the estimate of the cost It will soon be available for all homes Illinois Central Officials Summoned to Hearing in Effort to Avert Strike Chicago UPJ Illinois Central railroad officials have been sum moned to an emergency hearing at Washington Thursday with rep resentatives of 2 railroad brother hoods in an effort to avert a strike scheduled for Aug 24 The hearing was called by the office of war mobilization and re conversion after conferences in Chicago failed to adjust a dispute over seniority and promotions be tween the company and Brother hood of Locomotive Engineers and the Brotherhood of Locomotive and Enginemen The I C and its subsidiary the Yazoo and Mississippi valley rail i iW6re told 2ast week to31 1800 locomotive firemen hostlers and hostler helpers had agreed upon strike action after rejecting findings of an emergency board j appointed by President Truman Buy your War Bonds and Stamps from your GlobeGazette earner boy Quisling also said in the letter that he was proud his predic tions of German victories had proved true The defendant said he believed an associate named Ychueckedanz actually wrote the letter to Hit ler But is it your idea Norway should be put in the greater Ger man reich asked golem No not quite replied Quis ling The letter does not cover my views in the right way Schjoedt introduced a memo randum from Quisling detailing his ideas of GermanNorwegian cooperation including use of the same flag money foreign policy and military command and aboli tion of customs duties between the 2 countries i Are those your ideas de manded Schjoedt I wrote that down as intended to hinder Norway from becomin a German protectorate Quisling But they are your ideasyou accept this document1 Solem Quislings hysterical followed pressed ouburst it to save my country The last 4 years have been a night mare for me because I had to fight both sides g Supreme Court Justice The 3rdday of Quislings opened with disclosure that court Psychiatrists had examined the defendant on June 18 and had found no signs that he is mad and nothing to show that he is a Person with underdeveloped or weakened mental power Special Prosecutor Annaeus Schjoedt read the text of a letter sent by Quisling to Hitler July Release AAF Officers Wrtfr 3670 Points Washington army air forces disclosed Wednesday that AAP officers with 35 to 70 dis charge points depending upon rank are being released upon re quest At present enlisted personnel must have 85 discharge points based on combat senice and de they are eligible for release However this may be cut The 85 score was set by the war department for all branches of the army An air force spokesman said the AAF officers were being released under the 35 to 70 point system because surpluses of officers have developed in some classifications and their duties are overlapping Certain officers with critical skills such as radar operators and other specialists are being retained The points required for dis charge of AAF officers ace 70 for captains and higher rank 58 for urst lieutenants 42 for second lieutenants 36 lor flight officers and 65 for warrant officers Not Safe Council Bluffs Lat tery 70 a former professional ac robat had always done hand springs without using his hands Because of his age he decided it was time to adopt a safe way employing hands He tried it and his hip MIDCONTINENT AIRPORT STOPS BEING DELAYED Must Await Purchase of Radio Equipment Company Official Says A MidC o n t i n e n t Airlines plane swooped down on the Mason City municipal airport Tuesday evening for a prelimi nary inspection of the field and facilities preparatory to the es tablishment of regular stops on the companys Kansas CityMin neapolis route In the plane were P H Carr auditor of property of the Mid Continent Airlines company Inc and Capt Warren chief pilot They conferred with Jim Wagner port manager and then hopped off for Kansas City A more extended visit had been planned here with city officials but an accident had delayed the flight from Minneap olis The visit by the MidContinent officials was the direct outcom of a trip taken to Minneapoli Monday by Mayor Howar Bruce Councilman H H Jen nings Manager Wagner and Johi L Johnson of the Chamber o Commerce industrial promolio department The Mason Cityans went t Minneapolis to arrive at a agreement wherein the MidCon tinent Airlines company woul MasonCIty airpor and space for conduct mg their operations It wa learned however that the nee of additional facilities will agai delay the long awaited day of air line stops at the local port At present there is no radi equipment available and opera tions cannot start at the port un til such time as this can be ob tamed CAA equipment now a ois 1 SATUtlMllli AREA FROM WHICH JAl TROOPS WILL WITHDRAW with American port cannot be utilized due t reservations in the laws govern mg such equipment It is esti mated that it may take 3 month before MidContinent can get this equipment Carr stated it was uot possiuli for the company to obtain thi equipment prior to this time sinew all equipment purchased throug anticipated need has been utilize In establishing operations through out the southern part of the com panys operation However application will bt made as soon as possible for au thority to install and operation started Carr said The company said Carr is eager to begin operations in Mason City since it recently has put into ef fect another flight and expects that Mason City will produce gooc volume of traffic Carr explained that radio i used in air operation much like the telegraph is used in train op eration in that it must be used for charting flights procuring res ervations obtaining clearance of space as well as to obtain weather clearance necessary Were only the latter the equipment at the e port at this time would have been prisoners dock in the Tokyo Reveals High Death Toll in Atomic Bdmbing TI T i T BV THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 160000 persons and left 200000 homeless The bomb which fmm i j j many persons daih thc raidssi working hours in the morning and the atomic Ticmb hitthe central tremendous with more than 60 000 killed according to latest fig ures available The number of dead is mount ing BS many those who re ceived burns cannot survive their wounds because of the uncanny effects the atomic bomb produc es on the human body Even those who received minor burns looked quite healthy at first only to weaken after a few days from some unknown reason and fre quently died Since the explosion of the atomic bomb affected an area of 30 kilometers in diameter and Practically all houses in this area were either blown up knocke down if difficult to count all of the bodies many of which are buried under collapsed buildings The sight o women and children wounded b the explosion defies description The radio report said the bomb hit a factory area on the north ern side of the Nagasaki station and although topographically parts of that city did not receive a direct concussion from the ex plosion ail windows and roofs in these more remote parts were shattered or blasted with the re sult that almost the entire city U S Parachute Teams Liberate 1700 or More Allied War Prisoners Chungking achute teams reported the libera tion of 1700 or more allied war prisoners and civilian internees from Japanese camps in China and Manchuria Wednesday From Mukdea came word that an American bomber had take off from that Manchurian city Tuesday for Sian approximately 100 miles to the north to brlng out the most famous prisonerLt Gen Jonathan HI Wainwright hero of Bataan and Corregidor The Mukden team said Russian forces took over the Mukden camp on their arrival there dis armed the Japanese guard and placed Maj Gen G M Parker an American officer in charge The officer presumably was aj Gen George M Parker Jr of Portland Ore who served un der Wamwright in the Philip pines Altogether the Mukden team said 1321 prisoners were liber ated at the Mukden camp Most were British but the prisoners also included 44 Americans 67 Jutch a Canadian and a French man Eight Americans and Brit ains and 10 Dutch were liberated at Sian the team said Paratroops who dropped at cipins China radioed back that hey had obtained the release of 317 allied prisoners and internees 117 Americans Thc Swiss consul acted as gobetween with the Japanese the team said and all internees have been moved o a hofel The Americans at Peiping in Idued 4 of the 8 missing flyers rom Lt Gen James H Doolittles ustoric first air raid on Tokyo n April 1942 None was identi icd however At Weihsien in Chinas Shan ung province another parachute earn were guests of liberated in ernees at a dance There too the wiss consul was cooperating lowever the Japanese comman er for the area declined to per ut American planes to land in he area immediately because of ears that the aircraft might be red on by his troops SEE TOTAL CUT IN MEAT POINTS Beef Points Due for Slice Sept 3 Washington UP Red point values on beef will be reduced substantially on Sept 3 but it will be at least 30 days before any meats can be made ration free it was learned Wednesday Food officials said the govern ment was not soinff to remove ra tion controls on meat until the po tential supply and noncivilian demands have been thoroughly clarified Beef ration values however will be cutby about 20 per cent at the beginning of the new ration pe riod Sept 3 After that it will be several weeks at the earliest be fore beef lamb and veal which are m the best supply can be made ration free But there is little hope for an early end to rationing of pork hams or bacon because of the low 1945 hog production Officials attributed the present improvement in the meat situation less to the abrupt end of the war than to these factors 1 The army already had accu mulated hnjre stockpiles in Europe and the Pacific and probably would have slackened purchases even if the war had continued 2 Quantities of meat particu arly beef arriving on the market lave been larger than anticipated This heavy flow promises to in crease this fall The office of price administra tion probably will lift present re trictions on livestock slaughter midSeptember These quotas iie subject of much criticism were imposed on packing plants to mprove distribution during the worst shortage period Final Signing of Surrender Aug 31 the f7n h t A ce j the Amelican fleet in Tokyo bay while he at the nearby airtoL ri commander of allied occupation forces dlsclosure announcing surrender instructions to desiend at AtsuS 10 miles from nifVal 3ndlnarine forces simultaneously go bay m vi f Is on of Japans 3 largest naval near the mouth of Tokyo said WiU vriitjit at u p Hi day 4 a m Friday Central War AH Nipponese military naval and civil aircraft must remain out of he air until the allies notify the Japanese of their disposition MacArthurs instructions given the Japanese emissaries who came to Manila Sunday and returned to Tokyo Monday also said that all merchant ships in Nipponese waters must be maintained with out damage and undertake no movement Vessels at sea were instructed to immediately throw overboard all explosives Coastal vessels under 100 tons in civilian supply work wore ex empted from the no movement order All Nipponese ships at sea must report their positions immediately to the nearest United States British or soviet radio station and GIs With 75 Points Kept on US Shores Washington The army is banning overseas shipment of en listed men with 75 or mere dis charge points At the same time it was learned that the war department soon will direct all branches of the army to cut beiow 37 the age limit for overseas duty At present the ground forces are screening out of divisions slated for Japanese occupation duties all men 37 or older The ground forces embrace all troops including the infantry except those in the service or air forces The lattertwo nowai ing out of redeployed units al men 38 or older Just how far the age limit may e reduced has not been deter mined One problem is that men n the service forces chiefly sup ly troops are older on the aver age than those in the ground and air forces The department said the 35th and 8Gth divisions the first 2 rc leployed from Europe for service in the Pacific were screened to eliminate ail men with 75 or more points The 37 year ajre limit also vas used In screening the 95th but not the 86th the department re lorted because there was not suf icient time to make the necessary personnel changes afler the dis ajre was lowered from 40 o 38 The age limit in the 86th vas 38 Some men in both thc Both and BGth divisions have protested against being sent to Japan after laving served in Europe The 95th now is at Camp Shelby Miss and he BGth is on the west coast awaiting shipment to Japan Deployment Timetable Paris rede ployment schedule for American divisions in the European the ater 13TII AIRBORNE Tow on the high seas enroute to he United States 70th 99th 106th infantry and 5th and 9th armored divisions due o arrive in assembly area com mand early in September The situation of other divisions s unchanged Kids Take farm Jobs Wcwoka Okla farm abor shortage here was relieved vhen virtually the entire class en oiled in vocational agriculture at Vewoka high school took farm obs after dismissal of school Weather Report FORECAST lason City Fair and continued cool Wednesday night Thurs day fair and warmer owa Partly cloudy and cool Wednesday Fair Wednesday night and Thursday hursday Warmer linncsofa Fair Wednesday and Thursday Not quite so cool ex treme north and west portions Wednesday night Warmer Thursday IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Tuesday 57 Minimum Tuesday 49 Precipitation 03 At 8 a m Wednesday 54 YEAR AGO Maximum gg Minimum rn commander in chief of the U S fleet Japanese or Japanesecontrolled submarines everywhere will re main surfaced flying a black pen nant and showing lights Under instructions the suftmersibtes must proceed to certain designated ports in Pacific islands and in the Philippines The safety and well being of all united nations prisoners of war and internees will be scrupulous ly preserved It was specified that this includes adequate food shel ter clothing and medical care un til MacArthur takes charge It also specified that local delivery of American dropped supplies will be insured Each camp or place of deten tion will be marked with 20foot high letters P W meaning war MacArthurs instructions di rected the removal of all mines minefields and other obstacles lo the safe movement by land sea and air into Tokyo bay ef fective at 6 p m Saturday Aug 25 Japan MacArthur also directed the re establishment and maintenance of all navigational aids continuance of piloting service and the duties of naval and other personnel con cerned with the operations of ports Brccchlocks will he removed from all coast defense antiair craft EUIIS and artillery within the Tokyo area and they shall be rendered inoperative All craft of whatever type in the Tokyo bay area and approach es are to be disarmed and im mobilized and all weapons in the area of initial evacuations are to be rendered inoperative MacArthurs instructions to the jnemy were announced soon after iie relaxed his order grounding all Japanese planes in order to per mit Nipponese use of a minimum lumber of unarmed aircraft for liaison purposes Earlier MacArthur made known hat the Japanese already have a copy of the surrender document they will be required to sign He said it informs them that representatives of Australia Can ada France the Netherlands and New Zealand will join the big 4 n The text of General MacAr ihurs message to the Japanese mperial general headquarters supplementing the document said Representatives of Australia Janada France the Netherlands and New Zealand will sign the surrender instrument The sur render instrument a copy where f was furnished your representa tives will be amended accord Tne message was the first indi ration that Japanese emissaries to he Manila preoccupation con ercnces had carried back to Japan he surrender document Previous announcements had said the con erence was limited to details per ammg to MacArthurs entry into Japan i   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 145+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication