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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: August 10, 1945 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - August 10, 1945, Mason City, Iowa                                NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME COUP DEPARTMENT OF HIST OSY AND ARCHIVES VOL LI THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES AU NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS Aa Jdited Prea ml umad FuU Leas MASON Cm IOWA FRIDAY AUGUST 18 BIG CONFER This Pacer ConilsU rf Two SectionsSection PROPOSAL OF SURRENDER Korea on Wide Front Japs Ask Peace But BELIEVE SECOND Emperor Must Stay vLUUIlU By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS I Other Red Troops Deep in Manchuria BULLETIN By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Tiie red army has smashed more than 100 miles into Manchuria from the northwest the soviet communique dis closed Friday 10 By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS The red armys Stalin tanks infantry and massed cavalry oiled through numerous gates in Manchurias defenses with sensational advances Friday Moscow dispatches reported and Tokyo announced the broadening of the soviet attacks to Korea and Sakhalin island Soviet correspondents said units of the soviet Pacific fleet had gone into action The Moscow radio announced that Outer Mongolia a pro tectorate of Russias adjoining Manchuria and Inner Mon golia on the west had declared war on Japan toward the heart of Manchuria along 3 main routes of m 5n Astern railway from Lupin Manchouli in the northwest the Mongolian caravan trail from Lake Bor in the IhP rljer from Khabarovsk in the northeast jne Kussians had opened up numerous gates in the enemys fully prepared defenses and apparently were bentC ot fenswe Moscowdispatches said These advfciesfaeeJared gains of up to 33 milesThursday were be ing enlargedsensationally Friday The Japanese were unable to hold a single defensive line alone i the frontier one soviet dispatch A reported The western and northwestern vanguards were driving hard for IVie city of Hulun Japa forward base on theChinese V Eastern railway 90 miles distant In the northeastern sector where the Hussions struck from the maritime provinces to protect their important naval and air base of Vladivostok the Russians also were making steady progress from Kharbarovsk and captured Fu Yuan toward Harbin rail heart of Manchuria 400 miles distant Moscow dispatches said the of the Russian attack in the east apparently had not biea fully developed and this offen sive from Khabarovsk appeared Bon against Use Japanese Kwan tanffarmr Moscow reported Swift initial gains The Russians plunged 14 miles into the stolen province from the east and 33 miles from the west Moscow reported the capture ol JinJin Surne which maps show to be an airport town 33 miles from the border of Outer Mon golia STORE CLOSING HOURS DECIDED VJ Day Hours Set as Soon as News Comes u wait to be only the forerunner of strong blows anywhere to the south be tween Khabarovsk and Vladi vostok This indicated that Tokyos re port of an invasion of Korea on a broad front was likely to be confirmed by Moscow shortly The Korean frontier at Changku feng is 90 miles southwest of Vladivostok An imperial headquarters com munique broadcast from Tokyo by Domei said this invasion was in the vicinity of Keiko about 20 miles northwest of Changkufeng The invasion of Japans half of Sakhalin island was at several loints along the 80mile frontier okyo announced i Chinese army spokesman in mgking declared the Japanese e preparing to move 5 divi ons back to Manchuria from lorth China On the 2nd day of Russias war fa nth Japan Tokyo quoted an im ail Tial headquarters communique tagsaying Russian troops had pen hasvvited Korea in the vicinity willl in the extreme northeast FoAl ol that country r vV invasion of jo name for the southern an S Sakhalin at several points Tokyo that at the same time a so viet force carried out a light bombardment of areas southwest of Buika in the vicinity of the invasion and west of Handa American air forces in China meanwhile were being deployed for close coordination with the Russians In the north The same coordination be tween allied planes and Russian ground forces which sped victory against the nnzis in Europe appar ently was about to be employed in the vast Asiatic theater of war Lt Gen George E Stratemeyer quoted in a Chungking dispatch said his U S 10th and 14th air forces already were being de ployed to meet the tactical situa tions created by the new Russian front and would reach out deep into enemy territory everywhere As waves of Russian Infantry tanks and cavalry backed by massed artillery battered into Manchuria from the east west Closing hours lor stores on VJ lay wereagreed upon Friday by the board of directors of the Re tailers Association a division of the Mason City Chamber ofCom merce The hours will be in effect as soon as official word is re ceived of the end the war If the news comes before II a m the stores will close for the balance of that day only If the news comes after II a m the stores will close for the balance of that day and all the next business day If the news should come after 11 a m Saturday the stores will be closed for the remainder of Satur day and all day Monday If the news comes any time Sunday the stores w l remain closed all day irians for a community observ ance in East park a retreat in Central park and a street dance in downtown Mason City were made at a meeting of representa tive citizens called Friday morn ing by Mayor H E Bruce The general community ob servance will be held according to the following schedule If the news of the warsend comes any lime Friday or before 11 a m Saturday the observance will be at 1 p m Saturday If the news comes after 11 a m Saturday or any time Sunday the time will be Monday at 1 p m If VJ day comes any day nexl week before 11 a m the observ ance will be at 1 p m that same day If it comes after 11 a m the time will be l p m the nest day Music by the municipal band and n series of speeches will make up the program for this event On the committee are Mrs R R Cer ney Father R p Murphy the Rev A N Rogness Carlelon Stewart A J Coslello Harold Snyder and Adrian Hart A retreat 10 be in charge of the American Lesion will be held in Central park ti 5 p m Of H day the war eniis or at 5 p m the next day if the news comes at night A street dance will be held on State street between Washington and Federal at 10 p m on the day the war ends provided the news comes before 6 p m If the news should come after 6pm i asAfcgs 2ssiSryonr V l OUTffJ MONGOLIA DAIREN KWANTUNC JAP4N Crwjfijo DEATH BOMB WIPED OUT CITY Reconnaissance Shows Smoke Rising 20000 Feet Above Nagasaki BULLETIN By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Japan filed an official protest o the U S government Friday airainst the American atomic bomb attack on Hiroshima last Monday Japanese the neivs agency omei announced in a Tokyo iroadcast The protest was lodged hrough the Sivlss government vhich is the protecting power for lapanese interests said the broad cast was further learned the dispatch said that the Japanese Government requested the Swiss minister here to explain to the In ternational Kefl Cross iic Geneva the objectives of the Japanese gov ernmenin nrnfMt in 4ta VTM4j Guam 2nd atomic bomb dropped on Japan obliter ited Nagasaki in an inferno of smoke and llame that swirled more than 10 miles into the strat osphere and could be seen for 250 miles an Okinawa dispatch said DIfVE AGAINST JAPSAiTOws locate Russian drives into at 8 separated points according to Moscow reports Japs said attacks were made at 1 and 2 Bomb bursts locate cities reported by Moscow to have been hit CAP wirepnoto K A engr Surrender At a Glance By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS qffers to accept the Potsdam declaration and surrender if Hirohito is permitted to retain his powers WHITEHOUSE says war is still on and no official word has been received through proper channels President Truman confers with cabinet PRIME MINISTER ATTLEE announcesEritdin is in communica tion with the United Slates Russia and China received through its ambassador jn Tokyo CELEBRATIONS start in Okinawa Chungking London and many other points Allied troops in Europe jubilant held the next night at 10 oclock A dance rt the youth center is planned and will follow the same schedule In charge of plans for the street dance are R J Macket Leslie Hawkins and Emil Koerber In charge of the youth center dance are Mr Kaerber and Mr Sny der Nick Degan of the V F W was appointed to make arrangements for handling crowds on downtown streets The American Legion junior re gional baseball tournament games to be played here Sunday Mon day and Tuesday at and p m will fit into this schedule of victory celebrations The program for the East park community observance will be presided over by the Rev C Bur nett Whitchead of St Johns Epis copal church It will open with the playing of the national anthem by the municipal band The invo cation will be by the Rev Am brose Giannoukos of the Greek Orthodox church followed by a speech by the Rev R P Murphy of Holy Family church After mu sic by the band the Rev A N Rogness of Trinity Lutheran church will deliver the benedic tion The singing of Columbia and more band music will close the program Buy yonr War Bonds and Editorial Appraisal The attention of readers is invited to an editorial bearing on developments in the Pacific war which appears in the first column on Page 10 of this edi tion 4 DISCHARGED FROM WAR DUTY Amdng those receiving recent discharges from the separation center at Jefferson Barracks Mo were the following from this por tion of north Iowa Laveme M Obermier Charles City Edward V Rierson Forest City Pfe Gordon J Dimler Luverne Pfc Isaac E Ainslie Cheers of Joy New York JP Cheers and shouts of joy echoed over Staten Islands waterfront area Friday when 1454 returning GIs on 4 troop transports learned of the Japanese Domei news agency broadcast that Japan was ready to surrender Fleets Pilots Hit Grounded JapAirforce Guam and Brit ish carrier Ja pans grounded airforce Irom its camouflaged or damaged 259 Nipponese air craft and gliders on northern Hon shu island Thursday a prelimin ary report Irdm Admiral Halseys 3rd fleet disclosed Friday The bag scored both on grounded craft and in the air wa the greatest yet reported for ini tial waves of a carrier strike b Halsey greater even than th damage reported for the same pe riod of the destructive attacks on July 10 and 28 Eleven enemy aircraft of small coordinated Kamikaze at tack on the fleet were shot down One of the suicide pilots manage to crash into a light fleet unit pos sibly a light cruiser or a destroyer which is retiring under its owr power Two enemy aircraft wer shot down in the vicinity of th fleet the preceding day The American and British pilot swept from Misawa airfield on th northern tip of Honshu to Matsu shima airfield 160 miles south ward in raids backing up HalseyL promise to support the Russian entry in the war by pinning down Japanese aircraft Japanese gliders were mention ed for the first time in the an nounccment that British carrie pilots destroyed 24 of the troo carriers Both British and American fly ers sank several small Japanese ships and damaged others The communique covered onV the initial action Thursday Strikes Thursday afternoon an damage caused by the 1500 car ernments States protest to the United Okinawabased pilots attacking other objectives on Kyushu Thurs lay said the clouds of smoke from Vaerasaki spread rapidly until they ibscured bombing targels 60 miles trom the port Flyers told United Press i J CiMJ VYUI orrespondent Russell Annabel at Okinawa that the atomic bomb explosion was too tremendous to believe One said that the blind ng glare of the blast was so great that when it faded he thought for a moment the sun was setting The airmens stories bolstered jrowing belief that the entire ur n or builtup area of Nagasaki major naval base industrial cen ter and Japans llth city was de stroyed by the atomic bomb The builtup area totaled only 4 square miles Four and one tenth square miles of Hiroshima were leveled Monday when th first atomic bomb was dropped on Japan Accurate assessment of the de struction of Nagasaki awaited re connaissance photpgraphs Kecon najssance planes which flew over the city 3 hours after the attacks said smoke rising to 20000 feetl Japan offered Friday to surrender to allied might under the Potsdam declaration on the condition that Emperor Hiro hito retain his rights as a the war went on Sxveden and Switzerland intermediaries between Japan and the allies received an important communication ap parently the official surrender offer from Japanese envoys late Friday and forwarded them to Washington London Moscow and Chungking through diplomatic channels The Swiss and Swedish actions came between 1 and 2 p m eastern war more than 5 hours after Tokyo first announced the surrender offer in a broadcast by Japans official Domei agency President Truman called his cabinet into session at 2 p m Earlier the white house said the Japanese offer had not been received officially and that the war was continuing Britain announced officially she was in communication with her al over whether to accept the condition that Emperor Hirohito must remain in the saddle Celebrations of victory already were under way in Chung king and London and on Okinawa where American troops at heavy cost fought to the very doorstep of Japan The red army meantime continued its advances in Manchuria gain ing up to 18 miles the soviet high command announced The Japanese surrender of fer first was heard in the United States in a Domei broadcast heard at a m eastern war time by the Associated Press and U S government monitors through herofficial news agency said the offer was being transmitted via Sweden and Switzerland and the Moscow radio said Russias ambassador in Tokyo Imd been officially informed by Japans foreign minister Shigenori Togo Once the offer is transmitted through official channels the condition imposed by Hirohito remain in prove a stumbling block to immediate accept ance by all the Potsdam United States Brit ain Russia and China The Potsdam declaration itself did not mention the emperors status but broadcasts of the U S office of war information have refrained from attacking Hiro hito Capt E M Zacharias in an official U S broadcast last month told the Japanese they would be able to form their own government under the Atlantic Charter once the allies terms of unconditional surrender were met The Domei agency broadcast that this offer had been communi cated to the allies through neutral intermediaries and expressed hone that an answer will be speedily forthcoming thus ending the allied wrath which has unloosed upon Japan the atomic bomb and the combined forces of the United States Britain China and Eussia Japanese pe r still covered the center of the cHv the avemie and Park Photographs taken at tip street from the Photographs taken at the time showed scatteredfires outside the smoke area Gen Carl A Spaatz commander the strategic air forces said Radio Tokyo still remained si lent on the results of the attack which almost certainly killed tens of thousands nf Japanese It did denounce thu Hiroshima raid again as a barbarous atrocity in which the citys population was snuffed out without being given a chance to lift a finger either in defense or defiance Japanese propaganda cries against the inhumanity and law lessness of the atomic bomb at tack left the American unmoved however Spaatz said American planes were dropping 3000000 leaflets a day on Japan telling her that she will be atombombed again and again until she sur renders The leaflets called on the Japa nese people to petition the em peror to end the war You should take steps now to cease military resistance the leaflets said Otherwise we shall resolutely employ this bomb and all of our other superior weapons promptly and forcefully to end the war Put Barricades at White House Washington IP Barricades wore thrown up around entrances to the white house Friday as a feverish endofthewar atmos phere gripped Washington Pedestrians were barred from the sidewalk on the Pennsylvania avenue side of the executive man sion and military nated from the scene months ago to patrol duty there Knots of people who began to gather in the area during the morning were kepi to the far sirfe of the avenue and LaFayelte park rier planes which returned to the attack Friday were not included Meanwhile the northern Hon shu steel city of Kamaishi still smouldered from the heavy shell ing it was given Thursday by the 3rd fleet white house Buy your War Bonds an 3 Stamps from your GlobeGazette carrier boy Weather Report Mason cloudy Friday night and Saturday with occa sional thundrstorms Friday night A little warmer Saturday FORECAST Iowa Mostly cloudy Friday and Friday night with scattered thundershowers in north and west Friday and in central and east Friday night warmer in west Friday Saturday partly cloudy scattered thundershow ers in extreme cast Minnesota Partly cloudy west mostly cloudy east portions with occasional showers Friday night and over most north and east portions Saturday A little warmer Saturday southeast and east central portions IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette Weather Statistics Maximum Thursday 72 Minimum Thursday 62 At 8 a m Friday 62 Precipitation in Mason City Thursday 08 YEAR AGO Maximum gg Minimum 75 acceptance of the Potsdam ultimatum would mean Lhat the nation would surrender unconditionally disarm and give ip her conquests returning Man huria and Formosa to China and paving the way to an independ ent Korea She would withdraw from Malaya the Netherlands East Indies and China The Dome statement first was heard in the United States by The Associated Press and gov ernment monitors The last sen tence was interrupted in this transmission but the full state ment was given by Domei at a m The gist of the statement was given also at a m To support its stand that the emperor should stay Domei cited a United States broadcast by Capt E M Zacharius as saying the Japanese would be free o determine their own government under the Atlantic Charter once allied peace terms were ac cepted Japan had rejected the Pols darn declaration July 27 the day after it issued Use of the atomic bomb and the entry of Soviet Russia into the war came after that Authoritative quarters in Lon don said the petition looks like the end of the war and a Brit ish foreign office commentator aid it sounds authentic There was general belief among London diplomats that the stipu lation to retain the emperor would not prevent the British government from accepting but some quarters suggested Russia might balk on this score Presumably a consultation of the United Stales Britain China and Russia would be necessary London observers said These na tions are the signatories of the Potsdam declaration Such a con sultation would take some time Domei said the Japanese gov ernment acted in obedience to Hirohito who U said desires earnestly to brin about an early termination of hostilities The Domei broadcast was re corded by the Associated Press The text of the transmission The Japanese government Fri day addressed the following com munications to the Swiss rid   

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