Mason City Globe Gazette, August 2, 1945

Mason City Globe Gazette

August 02, 1945

View full page Start A Free Trial!

Issue date: Thursday, August 2, 1945

Pages available: 22

Previous edition: Wednesday, August 1, 1945

Next edition: Friday, August 3, 1945

NewspaperARCHIVE.com - Used by the World's Finest Libraries and Institutions
About Mason City Globe GazetteAbout NewspaperArchive.com

Publication name: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

Pages available: 311,935

Years available: 1901 - 1994

Learn more about this publication
  • 2.05+ billion articles and growing everyday!
  • More than 400 years of papers. From 1607 to today!
  • Articles covering 50 U.S.States + 22 other countries
  • Powerful, time saving search features!
Start your membership to the world's largest newspaper archive now!
Start your genealogy search now!
See with your own eyes the newspapers your great-great grandparents held.

View sample pages : Mason City Globe Gazette, August 02, 1945

All text in the Mason City Globe Gazette August 2, 1945, Page 1.

Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - August 2, 1945, Mason City, Iowa NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME DEPARTMENT OF HISTORy AND ARCHIVES KOINES I A Associated Press and United Prea full Leased Wires THE NEWSPAPER THAT LAVAL ARRIVES IN PARIS FOR TRIALSurrounded by stemfaced French police Pierre Laval accused arch collaborationist with the nazis while he was premier of the Vichy government of France is placed under arrest upon his arrival at Le Bourget airdrome in Paris Standing in front andto the right of her husband is Mme Laval her head covered with a scarf She accompanied him in his llight to surrender to American forces at Linz Austria from Barcelona Spain Laval is indicated at X No Champagne or Fine Food for Nervous Pierre Laval as He Awaits Treason Trial Paris was no pagne or fine food in Fresnes prison Thursday for Pierre Laval and the nervous little man could be that most of his coun trymen hated him The man in the street summed HP the announcement of Lavals by snapping Ws about time Most Frenchmen believe that Laval largely is responsible for Vichys collaboration policy Most observers believed he faced almost certain conviction as a traitor in the trial which is ex pected to occur as soon as the preliminary examinations can be pushed through It was significant that one of the firstpeople to meet him at Lebourget Wednesday was Exam ining Magistrate Maurice Beteille Laval spent his first night at Fresnes in a solitary cell with double guards 011 the oufside He was barred from any communica tion with the 4000 other accused collaborators and traitors housed in the same prison The automobile conveying Ln val from Lebourget arrived at Fresnes at 8 oclock Wednesday night Plainclothes men sat on either side of Laval who hunched down in the car with a soft hat pulled over his face The car paused for a few mo ments outside the prison gates Laval stared uneasily at the small group onlookers lie was preceded into prison by Mrs Laval who sat in the first automobile in the convoy She was wearing a heavy checkered coat and appeared overwhelmed as she entered Fresnes Earlier she had been cheerful The party was received by Prison Director Andre Escoiffier who escorted the Lavals immedi ately to a reception room where their names were taken and their finger prints recorded Laval then was placed in a cell in the 3rd division with his wife in another cell close by Farm Sells at Auction for an A Manly The 128acre farm of Francis Fessenden and his wife Anna 3 miles south of Manly was sold at Auction Wednesday to Harry E Taylor of Swaledale for Slli25 Possession will be given March 1 1946 Mr and Mrs Fessenden who have lived on the farm for 52 years expect to purchase a home and move to Mason City where 2 sons and a daughter reside Crying the sale were Col Albert Hopfe and brother Leonard of Austin Minn Leonard Simmer of the Manly state bank was clerk Unusual Names Tnsion W The senate thought some United States towns had unusual and interesting names when noting the list for which President Truman named postmasters Wednesday Among them were Swaledale Iowa Sub umity Ore and Novelty Ohio NEW DISCHARGE SCORE STUDIED Present Point Score Will Be Left at 85 Washington army an nounced Thursday the present point score for discharge will be left at 85 while about 800000 men with that score are being re leased Later the score will be revised to provide for the discharge of another 700000 men by June I 1946 the date by which the army had announced a total of 1500000 men would be discharged under the credit point system In announcing this Secretary of War Stimson said he could not say now when the new score would be given The war depart ment previously had stated it ex pected to announce the new criti cal score with points slightly lower than the present figure some time in July Stimson said that at the time of the revision of points to provide for discharge of the 700000 man group a new computation of indi vidual scores would be made to give soldiers credit for service after May 12 1345 This was the date to which credit points ran under the original interim score of 85 This new computation Stimson said will allow some men who would not have had enough points by trie computation of last May to earn their discharge by their serv ice between then and the time of the new computation This he told a news conference will obviously give the advant age of battle credit and overseas credit to troops in the Pacific Whatever the new score Stim son said it will not the right to discharge of those who previously qualified under the May score of 85 If they have not already been discharged when the score goes into effect they will remain eligible for release at the earliest opportunity By the nature of the point sys tem and the disposition of forces Stimson said a substantial part of the 700000 men will be those now in the active Pacific theater Boiling Chicago temperature soared into the 90s when Philip Azallon came into the Cragin po lice station to report theft of articles from his parked automo bile Stolen he said were 3 pairs of ice skates ANNOUNCE PAIRINGS The pairings for the opening rounds of he state junior Le sion baseball tournament will be found on the sports page of this edition They were an nounced shortly after 1 oclock Thursday afternoon MASON CITY IOWA THURSDAY AUGUST 2 1945 Five Cents a Copy MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS This Paper Consists 01 Two One NO 255 Expressing optimism for the fu ture peace and prosperity of America and the world and the same time warning against a ten dency to consider the San Fran cisco charter an international Senator Bourke B Hick enlooper addressed the Mason City Kiwanis club Thursday noon Iowas junior senator called the charter a fine pattern on which peace can be the other nations of the world approach the problem with the same sincerity moral viffor and cooperative spir it that the United States has dis played Hickenlooper expressed his per sonal belief that this has no essential differences with the Russians and nothing to fear from the Soviet party line America must of course exercise judg ment and care in all its interna tional associations he added but the Russians have a 200year job ahead of them in developing the resources and potentialities of their tremendous country Of the United States postwar role Senator Hickenlooper said America today has the only or ganized economy left in the It is a tower of strength in the midst of unbelievable devastation Upon the judgment vigor good sense and consistency with which we reestablish the American system in our own country de pends the rehabilitation of the warstricken countries abroad The senator differed sharply with what he labeled propaganda to the effect that the U S has been an isolationist nation On the country he said this country has demonstrated an internation alist spirit since before World st Considering Charter as CureAll War I lias realized and accepted its responsibility in world affairs for years No other nation accord ing to him would have given of its substance and its humanity in 2 foreign as has the United Slates Moving from the world affairs o the home front Senator Hick enlooper warned against a grow ing tendency toward centraliza tion in national government This Philosophy of bureaucracy he Believes has ominous possibilities for Americas future He admitted I the benefits of centralization in an emergency when speedy action is required but said a continuation of the policy would result in the loss of more and more rights by the individual He urged a definitive govern ment statement on postwar re conversion of American industry so that manufacturers and em ployers can feel secure in their individual planning Markets in South America and Europe are being lost today because priority restrictions hamper American de livery of the goods he said Price controls are necessary he said but we must have sensible practical businesslike administration on a basis of equal ity if American business is to go forward with the confidence and the venturesome spirit that has characterized it in the past The speaker criticized various government agencies including the state and treasury depart ments for what he called one sided propagandizing of Bretton Woods and the San Francisco rter ciiiti er FIRES RAGE IN 4 JAP CITIES Pierre Laval Will Be Called on Witness Stand in Treason Trial Against Marshal Petain Paris Laval name has flitted frequently through 10 days of testimony will be called as a witness Friday in the treason trial of Marshal Pe tain the court announced Thurs day The old marshal fell sound asleep as did 3 of the jurors as a procession of defense witnesses portrayed him as antiGerman and as a patriot who gave up French artillery jn north Africa to prevent the Germans from marching through Spain to attack Gibraltar It was Gen Bernard Serigny long a friend ot Petain who told how Hitler early in 1941 demanded from Generalissimo Franco the right to send troops across Spain to attack the British bastion juarding the western entrance of the Mediterranean The general who described himself as an intimate friend of the marshal said Franco had dis closed the demand to Pelain along with the information that he had refused Petain himself was uneasy about Spain the witness testified but he quoted the marshal as say ing Franco can count on me in re sisting the Germans demand for permission to cross Spain As the trial started its 10th day defense counsel read a cable signed by John Alexander Schaef fer director of the national re publican vigilance committee New York which said American veterans who had the honor of serving in France under Gen Pershing and who have admired you through the years as a soldier and patriot salute you in this grave hour With abiding affection and con fidence we condemn your trial unrepresentative of the great French people and pray that the conscience of France will compel termination of the proceedings There still was no announce ment when Pierre Laval chief of government in Petains Vichy government would be called from Fresnes prison to testify Leon Noel the first witness who was ambassador to Poland at the start of the war testified that the armistice had no secret clauses He was a member of the French armistice commission Noel said he told a cabinet meeting on June 26 1940 that it was necessary tn maintain close relations with the United States and Great Britain and warned Laval who was negotiating with She Germans that no concessions beyond terms of the armistice should be granted Hitler He said Vichy twice refused German requests for north Afri can air bases Although a defense witness he criticized the armistice and also etain and his associates for col laborating with the Germans It was a sad thing to see so many Frenchmen serving their own interests by agreeing to serve the German interests he said He found fault with the armis ice phrases about the French fleet which he said couid have be been saved in the period tween June 17 and June 23 However Adm Jean Darlai assured me he had given order to prevent the Germans from seizing the fleet Noel said I never thought these orders would mean the suicide of one of the worlds greatest fleets Deployment Timetable Paris rede ployment timetable of U S army divisions 9TH ARMY HEADQUARTERS On high seas first elements sched uled to reach U S this weekend 20TH ARMOKED On high seas expected to start reaching port middle of next week 28TH INFANTRY On high seas expected to arrive middle of next week 30TH INFANTRY En ioute from Le Havre to Southampton from where it will leave for New York on Queen Mary except for certain units remaining at Le Havre clear simultan eously with Queen Mary 4 5 TH Advance1 party on high seas bulk being processed at Camp St Louis in Reims area scheduled to leave for Le Havre about Aug 10 35TH INFANTRY Being pro cessed at Camp Norfolk in Reims area its movement to Le Havre deferred until middle of August 13TH AIRBORNE Advance party on high seas main body be ing processed at Camp Pittsburgh in Heims area for shipment late in August Advance parties of all listed units except 45th infantry and 13th airborne now home Weather Report FORECAST IHason City Occasional thunder showers and cooler Thursday and Thursday night becoming partly cloudy and a little warm er Friday Iowa Considerable cloudiness with occasional rain and scat tered thunderstorms Thursday Partly cloudy Thursday night and Friday Slightly cooler Thursday and in south Thurs day night Thursday night and Friday except scattered showers extreme southeast Thursday night little change in temperature IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Wednesday Minimum Wednesday At 8 a m Thursday YEAR AGO Maximum Minimum SB SO 67 88 62 Bny your War Bonds and Stamps from your GlobeGazette carrier boy Pfc Donald R Burgess Is Wounded on Okinawa Entered Service Last September Home on Furlough in January Pfc Donald R Burgess son oi VIr and Mrs O R Burgess 1039 East State was seriously wounded on Okinawa on June 30 according o a telegram received here from he war department Thursday The message stated that the hos pital was sending a new address and further information Donald entered the service last September and following comple ion of his training at Camp Fan nin Tex in January was home n furlough before being sent to Fort Ord Cal and thence over eas In April he had met his brother Charles based at Honolulu and PFC 1JONALD R BURGESS had spent a day with him there the first time the brothers had seen each other in 21 months WORLD TO KNOW BIG 3 RESULTS Plan Joint Communique of Conference Friday Potsdam big 3 began their homeward journeys to their respective capitals Thursday after formally ending the historic Pots dam conference by writing a joint communique which will be re leased to the world Friday The conference ended in an at mosphere of cordiality The world was expected to know soon what President Truman Prime Minister Aftlee and Premier Stalin planned tor the immediate future of Eu rope but the full import of what they accomplished since the ses sions opened July 17 may not be realized for some time insofar as decisions may affect the Pacific war Truman left in a C54 plane nound for Washington by way of Plymouth Attlee left from an airfield near Potsdam to take up the reins of he new laborile government and t was believed possible Premier Stalin had left for Moscow al though there was no announce ment of the departure of his spe cial train British Foreign Secretary Ernest Bevin left Potsdam by plane sev eral hours after Attlees departure to return to Britain The strict secrecy imposed on he deliberations from the outset was maintained until the close of the conference A joint communi que will be issued to the worlds press Thursday night for study and will be released simultaneously in the 3 capitals Friday a public re lations officer said Truman Heads for Home After Talk With King George President Has Lunch Off Plymouth Port With British King With President Truman President Truman headed back to the United States Thursday stopping at Plymouth for a 20 minute talk with King George VI as the Big 3s Berlin declaration was drawn up for release to the world Thursday night MrTruman had lunch with the Brilish monarch aboard H ill S Renown lying off the warbat tered port of Plymouth The king arranscd lo visit the president later aboard the U S S AuRusla the cruiser which brought him to Europe The British monarch and the first American president to visit Britain since President Wilsons visit after World WaiI met aboard the British battle cruiser Renown at p m a m Central War Welcome to my country the king said The president and the monarch shook hands with cordiality and stood chatting while claspino hands Mr Truman wore a light grey lounge suit with a red overcheck brown shoes and a light grey hat He made the visit to the Re nown after boarding the U S Cruiser Augusta which hnd brought him to Kurope for the Big 3 conference at Potsdam lowan Is Sent to Naval School San Dicjto Cal Rich ard C Doss Rock Rapids Iowa was one of 10 naval gunfire liai son officers who the llth naval district said Wednesday has been assigned as an instructor at the naval gunfire liaison school am phibious training base at Trans bay Coronado All 10 are Iwo Jima veterans APPOINTS 4 TO BANKING BOARD Des Moines Robert D Biue Thursday named 4 bankers to 4year terms on the state bank ing board They are W R Remien of the Atlantic State bank John Baylor What Cheer State bank Ray A Nold Rock Rapids State bankand Arthur Donhowe Central National bank Des Moines Melvin W Ellis Charles City state banking superintendent served as an ex officio member of the board KING GEORGE Receives Award Omaha Nisscn of Harlan Iowa received the silver star here Wednesday a posthu mcus award to his cousin Pfc N Nielsen who was killed in action in France Dec 14 ONLY DEBRjS REMAINS AFTER 820 B29S HIT 6632 Tons of Bombs Dropped in Worlds Greatest Aerial Raid By LEONARD MILLDIAN Associated Press War Editor Solid walls of fire swept over t Japanese cities hit Thursday in the worlds greatest air raid Incredible flames raging over 3 forewarned railway centers and an aluminumproducing city were only part of the days work of 820 Superforls which unloosed 6632 tons of destruction in the early morning hours shortly aft er 4 American naval bombard ment and rescue operations stretched across 3000 miles of the Pacific Mine laying B29s reached al most to Soviet Russian territory reir bSgest penetration of the Nipponese empire It was only a wideninS campaign which Gen Claire Chen nault retiring leader of Amer ica s Flying Tigers in China said would cut off Japan completely from the Asiatic mainland with in a month from Admiral Nimitz and Tokyo Radio said a small naval task force shelled O is land 70 miles from Tokyo a sub Hnk Hokkaido island north of Tokyo a battleship bombarded Wake is land and other fleet units rescued Bi natives from Nipporeseheld in Marshall is ands All actions occurred Wednesday Superforts packing 232 ions more bombs than hit Normandy on Europe s Dday set fires rag ing in 4 Japanese industrial cities wrecked 4 oil plants in Tokyo bay WaCrE Iinkins Only a few interceptors and relatively ight antiaircraft opposed the greatest air fleet ever mounted Only one B29 failed to return Tokyo which reported at tacks extended over 8 cities in shot Korea 11 were General conflagrations rated through fe 4 announced target ci tics all of which were old the attack was coming It was the initial fire raid Tin each Targets were Mito rail center 60 miles north of Tokyo Hacmoff rail center 23 miles west of Tokyo Magaoka railway town on west ern Honshu island and Toyama west coast aluminum city High explosives were loosed on 4 Kaiva L r35 in bav with good effect These attacks were carried out by 778 B29 cremaininS 42 Superforts mined Shimonoseki strait south of Honshu and waters north of Korea Tokyo reported 60 Mustanjj fighters from Iwo Jima struck Honshu again Thursday raiding whl area for 2 while Okinawabased planes struck otner points Airdromes and rail transporta tion m the XagoyaKobe area were rocketed and strafed Wednesday by 37 two Mustangs and Thunder holts boring through rain clouds Four were lost Bombers and fighters from Ukmawa raking Kyushu south ernmost island of Japan blew up facjtorcs and ftiel depots knocked out 10 locomotives and 7 ships including 2 destroyer escorts Bombings of transportation links m the Kyushu region are be ing carried out in a systematic and Uiorougn manner conceded Naolo Kohiyama Japanese transporta tion minister after a tour of the island during which American machmegun bullets spattered around him Seventh fleet patrol bombers sweeping down the China coast destroyed 28 enemy coastal craft around the ports of Hong Kong and Swatow Closest to home of all fleet ac ions was the Japancssreported bombardment of O island Tokyo said carrier planes sup ported the bombardment force which consisted of one cruiser and ;

RealCheck