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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: July 31, 1945 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - July 31, 1945, Mason City, Iowa                             r OF AHO ARCHIVES W01 HE JJ IA NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH WWANS NEIGHBORS VOU U Associated Press and United Press Full Leased Wire drive Cents a Copy MASON CITY IOWA TUESDAY JULY 31 1945 LOOK OUT BELOW Here Comes Iowas Corn Crop Howard Loclj 2 year old son of Photographer Safford W Lock and Mrs Lock went to the farmof his grand parents Mr and Mrs P H Pals of Meservey to look over the crop situation These pictures taken by the boys father reveal that North Iowa is going to produce a crop this year The corn delayed by cold weather in June is 6 feet high on the Pals farm Hot weather in July sent it surging upward The oats is in the shock with heads well filled indicative of a heavy yield J Tractors such as Howard is shown manning in the lower picture do the heavy work on the farms having to a large degree replaced horses The Pals farm is operated by P H Pals father of Mrs Lock and her brother Andrew AFTER ESCAPE Secret Telegram AT FORT DODGE Tlus Paper Consists of Two NO 253 U S WARNS 12 JAP CITIES TeenAged Boys Were Slipped Hacksaws by Young Girl Friends Carroll Two teenaged ouths who sawed their way out t the Fort Dodge city jail Mon ay with hacksaw blades which Vebster County Attorney Thom as M Healy said were slipped hem by their girt friends were trrested here Tuesday The youths Kenneth Worrick 4 and Frank Grell Jr 17 both Fort Dodge surrendered read lyi Carroll County Sheriff Tom f Finegan reported Neither was irmed They were to be returned to ort Dodge later Tuesday where he girls lola Wertz 16 and Dar ene Breeden 15 also of Fort Jodge were being held in the Vebster county detention home Charges of assisting prisoners to jscape have been filed against hem Healy said Juvenile court hearing for the Orls will be conducted at 10 a n Wednesday before Judge John VI Schaupp At the same time he boys will be taken to court and the state will ask permission o file against them criminal charges of escaping from lawful custody Healy said He added that jermission also would be sought o file criminal charges of theft of a motor vehicle against Wor rick and Grell Healy said the boys effected heir escape with blades con cealed in a watermelon and cake he girls had given them a few lours earlier At the time of the getaway Worriclt and Grell were under sentence to the boys reformatory at Eldoralor aiseriesvxoJ Fort Dodge breakins Worrick had confessed breaking into 44 busi ness places in recent months and 3rell was implicated in 3 rob jeries police said The loot from he robberies was estimated by police at approximately 51000 Healy said the youths left Fort Dodge on a stolen motorcycle which Night Policeman Joe Hel er of Carroll saw them riding in he business section here shortlv Before he and Night Policeman Leonard Hinze arrested them MORE HEAT DUE IN IOWA Des Moines Tues day were preparing to perspire again as the mercury climbed ack into the familiar nineties after several days of unusual straying in the eighties and sev en ties The weather bureau predicted ligher temperatures Tuesday with continuing scattered thunder showers throughout the state Council Bluffs and Sioux City gave an indication what prob ably was in store for the rest of Iowa as the western Iowa cities recorded temperatures of 96 anc 93 Monday respectively Following the two leaders Lamoni 90 Burlington 88 Spen er and Des Moines 87 Davenpor 86 Dubuque and Iowa City 84 PAYROLL THUGS Burbank Cal JP P o 1 i c throughout the state were on th alert Tuesday for 2 gunmen wh accomplished one of Southern Californias largest payroll rob beries in recent years when the relieved 2 bank messengers o in cash The messengers Victor lxhn 26 and Tharston Patterson t told Detectives Frank Porter an John McAnliffe that their ca was halted Monday by 2 men one In army uniform and wear ing a military police armband and the other in civilian clothes Lohn and Patterson said th men forced them at gunpoint t get in the back of their own car and then drove to some nearby hills The messengers said the gun men bound and gagged them and then drove off with their car and the bags of money Lohn and Pat terson were delivering the money from the Hollywood State bank to a checkcashing agency near the Lockheed aircraft plant The bank employes said they finally freed themselves and hitchhiked to a telephone to no tify police of Paris Maxime Weygand declared Tuesday that Mar hal Petain sent a secret telegram to Adm Jean Darlan ordering the dmiral to cease operations against United States and British forces t the time of the landing in North Africa The general who was commander in chief of French armies when Sermany crushed the republic was brought to the high court of jus ice under guard and in civilian jess to testify as the first defense vituess in Petains trial on charges of intelligence wilh the enemy nd plotting against the security of France Petains attorneys iiey would ask for a postpone nent of the trial if Pierre Laval vas returned to France Laval vho was chief of government in be Vichy regime landed in Liaz Vustria Tuesday after being oust d from Spain where he sought efuge when Germany collapsed Weygand assumed full responsi ility for the armistice He gave ne of the first detailed accounts f events leading to and after the urrender of France He said Darlan was completely avorable to the Germans when Africa was invaded in the fall of 942 It was not clear from the gen rals testimony whether Darlin ver received the telegram but it vas the first time anyone had tated that Petain had any part in lalting French resistance to the illies The old marshal who looked ired and pale when this 8th dgy of the trial began became so en hused by Weygands testimony hat he rose during the cross ex imination and spoke for 3 minutes vithout halt again breaking his vow of silence I want Jo thank Gen Weygand mblicly and inform the court that le has my complete approval and hat I consider that he as com mander in chief carried out his duties completely Petain said Weygand testified in cross ex amination that he and the former United States representative in north Africa Bqberf Murphy liad signed anr agreement which the general called the MurphyfWey promising de iveries of American supplies to north Africa on condition thXI German occupation of the region was not permitted Coordinated resistance no longer was possible the mufti clad general said when he de cided to ask the government to demand an armistice I considered it my duty as commander in chief to ask for an armistice 1 took the decision Pierre Laval Surrenders to U S Troops in Austria SECOND TIME 10 u a jroops in Austria 1UA 1H to Be Handed Over to French 4 DAYS NIPS GET NOTICE OF RAID Frankfort on the Main Pierre Laval expelled from Spain flew to Austria and surrendered Tuesday to U S occupation au thorities who arranged to hand him over to France at once The swarthy former chief of the Vichy government who is charged with collaboration with the Ger mans arrived with his wife in a Junkers 188 manned by 2 German pilots The plane landed at Horsching airport Linz Austria where Unit ed States troops immediately took Laval into protective custody uavm mto protective custody myself and on purely military French army headquarters were aLavalqandhis of collusion with Marshal lain Peleft later in custody of U S Maj Gen John Copeland for the French occupation zone His plane landed before noon He said however that the first fanAhmlStiTe oelore nc President Albert LaBrun after a flight from Barcelona nf iKo fnet nnnn A one of the first witnesses against the old soldier This was made a 01 iorces said m maKmg the an on May nouncement that no additional de 2o 1940 when Weygand said Le tails were available The former Rrllri if if umill I Brun asked if it would not be better to obtain conditions of peace before the armies were de stroyed Iwas not of an armistice at that time he said I was still fighting the battle of the north and I had plans pre pared for the battle of the Som meAisne fo follow It He denied a statement previ ously attributed to Petain in which Weygand reportedly was instructed to fight until your armies no longer are in liaison and then J Petain will impose an armistice Weygsnd was preceded by Mar cel Paul a court witness and member of the consultative as sembly who charged the Vichy police with tortures and cruelty and blamed Petain for their ac tions He said the French feared the Vichy police ten times more than the German gestapo Another member of as sembly Paul Arrighi testified briefly that the ordinary French man was stupefied when the French army stoppedfighting He declared he was even more shocked when Petain met Hitler at Montoire He denounced the antibolshevik legion organized by the Vichy regime and the com pulsory labor laws Mason City Father Killed in Action on Luzon P I Pfc James H Johnsen Former Decker Employe Overseas Since February Pfc James H Johnsen whose wife and 3 children live at 522 15th S E was killed in action by enemy fire near Oplas Neuva Viz eaya Luzon P I on July 4 ac cording to a message received here from thewar department Johnsen entered the army last Sept 28 and was given a weeks furlough in January after finish ng his training at Camp Fannin Tex At that time he first saw iis baby son then 3 weeks old He eft for overseas duty in Febru ary Surviving besides his wife and 3 children Nadine 4 Ronald 2 and Dennis 6 months are his par ents Mr and Mrs John Johnsen 202 12th S E Mrs Johnsen is the daughter of Mr and Mrs William Nuehring As a civilian he was employed at Jacob E Decker Sons PFC JAMES H JOHNSEX Bay year War Bonds and Stamps from your GlobeGazette carrier boy Weather Report FORECAST Mason City Fair and hot Tuesday afternoon with considerable hu midity becoming partly cloudy with thundershowers Wednes day morning Iowa Fair and warmer Tuesday partly cloudy Tuesday night and Wednesday with scattered thunderstorms west portion Tuesday night and over entire state Wednesday Temperature will average 8 degrees above normalSlightly cooler Wednes day Minnesota Cloudy with occasion al showers and thunderstorms Tuesday night Wednesday part ly cloudy with showers north and east portions Cooler south IN MASON CITY Maximum Monday 82 Minimum Monday 69 At 8 a m Tuesday 75 Precipitation in Mason City Monday night 02 YEAR AGO Maximum 84 Minimum 59 additional firms have won the ArmyNavy E award the war and the navy departments an nounced Tuesday One Iowa firm the LinkBelt Speeder corporation LinkBelt Co Cedar Rapids was included Buy your War Bonds and Stamps from your GlobeGazette carrier boy A spokesman for United States forces said in making the an chief ot the Vichy government had left Barcelona in a Germanman ned Junkers 188 It was believed his presence in the American zone would offer a tough problem in FrenchAmeri can relations which could be solved only by prompt delivery of Laval to French authorities already has condemned Laval to death in his absence Deployment Timetable Paris redeploy ment table Ninth army headquarters On the highseas with the first ele ments expected to arrive in the United States next weekend 30th armored division On PIERRE LAVAL Stalin Causes 2 Day Delay in Big 3 Talk Potsdam Marshal Stalin attended a hour big 3 conference Tuesday after a 2 day absence caused by u slight head cold it was announced Tuesday Stalins slight illness had pre vented his conversations since Sunday with President Truman aud Prime Minister Attlee Ffeig Secretary 28th Infantry division Advance party has arrived inAmerica with the main body on the high seas and expected to dock Aug 6 30fh Old Hickory infantry di vision At LeHaire staging area envoute to Southampton to board the Queen Mary for New York 35th Santa Fe infantry divis ion Processing at Camp Norfolk in the Reims assembly area and expected to moxe to LeHavre Jate this week 451h ThunSerbira infantry di vision Processing at Camp St Louis in the Reims area scheduled to go to Le Havre about Aug 10 13th airborne division Now pro cessing at Camp Pittsburgh in the Reims area for August shipment Advance units of all but the 2ath and 13th are on the high seas Peace Pipe Pipestone lUihn UPJIf Pres ident Truman ever has occasion to smoke a peacepipe he can use his own red Pipestone pipe sent him by the local camp of Royal Neigh bors of America Mr Truman has been a member of the Independence Mo camp tor 32 years Stalins complete recovery Stalins indisposition was be lieved nothing more than a slight cold but the 66 year old premiers physician took ever3 precaution to safeguard his health Freedom of Press St Louis Tru man will ask Russia at the Pots dam conference to give American correspondents more freedom ol news coverage Stephen T Early press secretary to the late Pres ident Roosevelt said Monday Al though he did not refer directly to Russia Early said before the president leaves Potsdam he will appeal if he has not already done so by now to the government represented there to admit the Lllc wurcung as tnose ot the American press to a coverage of first warning but some or all will all news events In their countries h Delegation Sees Empty Shelves in Oslo Stores Oslo UR A delegation toured congressional Oslos stores Tuesday appalled over the empty shelves and the high prices asked Iowa Company Wins ArmyNavy E Award for shoes for paper tops and woodeji soles The delegation led by Rep Victor Wickersharti D Okla conferred with otficials at the U arrival from Copenhagen Mon day Norwegian officials told them of the countrys urgent need for coal for industries and oil for the fishing fleet The textile situation was also discussed Some congressmen proposed sending cotton to Nor His condition was reported im proved Tuesday and if the Russiai leader is fit enough to resume the arduous 3hour discussions which have been typical of the confer ence to date it is believed the parley may be completed by Thursday or Friday Big 3 themselves In other words the talks are believed to have reached the payoff stage to use undiplomatic slang It appeared that further inter ruptions were unlikely The German communis parly newspaper Deutsche Volkszeftung published in Berlin reprinted ex cerpts from an editorial in Mos cows Pravda which declared that the problems of the future for defeated Germany are the central point of the Potsdam conference The editorial also attacked the Catholic bishops of AmeVican ruled Bavaria saying they were lying about Germanys responsi bility for the war and its conse quences Eight New Cities on Bombing List as B29s Drop 720000 Leaflets Guam UP Twelve Japanese ities including 4 previously warned were given notice Tues day night Japanese time by MLIJ Gen Curtis E Lemay that they are marked for destruction by American Superfortresses Evacuate these cities immedi ately the commander of the 20th air force warned in 720000 leaf Lets dropped from fi Superforts on the doomed municipalities More than 1300000 persons live in the 12 cities Thus for the 2nd time within 4 days General Lemay gave ad vance notice to Japan ot indus trial and military targets where fhe B29s soon will apply the torch The 8 cities added to the pre vious list are Mito Hachioji Mae bashi Toyama Nagano Fuku yama Otsu and Maizuru all in dustrial and transportation cen ters on Honshu Tuesdays notice also included Nagaoka and Nishinomiyn on Honshu Hakodate on Hokkaido and Kurume on Kyushu which were given their first warning last Saturday Koriyama on Honshu was also on the first warning list but was not mentioned Tuesday Six cities on the original list were left in ashes by the Super torts Sunday morning within 24 hours after they had been fore warned without the loss of a single plane They were Tsu Aomori Ichinomiya Ogaki and Ujimada on Honshu and Uwaiima on Shikoku There no report herelhat the 900000 Japanese civilians and war workers who were warned the first time heeded the warning but by now they must know that LeMay and his 20th air force mean business The leaflets prepared in co ordination with the psychological warfare service notified the Jap anese that America isnt fighting the Japanese people but is fight ing a military clique which has enslaved the Japanese people So you can restore peace by demand ing new and good leaders who will end the war We cannot promise that only these cities will be among those attacked the pamphlets said in the same wording as those ot the first warning but some or all will be so heed this warning and evac uate these cities immediately With the leaflets went the frankly expressed hope that the Japanese will begin to see that their military forces are unable to protect them and that American bombers not only can bomb Japa nese cities at will but can give due warning before missions begin and 11 LI 12 u d ui J nutiv a t The talks are understood to sti carry them through have reached a point where the Ane cmes warned were small heaviest work involves upon the S a11 Snly important to the 7 Japanese War New Elk Leader Devils Lake N D district deputy grand exalted rul er of North Dakota Elks lodges is VUHWH lu TI Ui 11ULU1 IJaKOia IQUFCS IS way but they were toid that the Mack V Trayvor local attorney spinning facilities were inade according to word received here Monday Allies Split on Treatment of Hirohito Washington coun A check of officials here shows s Th Washington cils are divided sharply over the treatment to be accorded peror Hirohito of Japan Em Thc difference of views which spreads among groups within the United States government as well as among other governments is understood here to have been the basic reason why Totsdam ultimatnm to Japan omitted all reference to Hirohito or to the monarchy as an institution As a result the way still is open for the Japanese to try to save their emperor as the pinnacle of their government However American officials says they are hurting their chances by delaying i inevitable capitulation A check of officials here shows the situation at the moment to be this 1 The British are reported following the line that the Japanese emperor should be preserved certainly the institution of monarchy in Japan primarily as a means of preventing chaos and possibly eventual dictatorship in the warwrecked country 2 At the other extreme the peoples political council of China has recommended to the Chinese government that Hirohito be branded as a war criminal Diplomatic officials here say that recommendation will have enormous weight in The United States is following 3 middle of the roadj wail and see policy The theory is that if the Japanese people really want Hirohito they probably should have a chance to demonstrate the fact If it turns out they do not want him then he should not in the American view be imposed upon them Indications are however that there is no unanimity among American officials themselves on the Hirohito policy 4 The situation has been further complicated by Australian rejection of the entire Potsdam ultimatum as being loo lenient toward the Japanese Japanese war machine Meanwhile American warships bombarded Japan for the 7ffi time Tuesday as allied planes were credited with taking a 3jday fcH of 267 Nipponese ships and 430 aircraft The great allied fleet which has been preparing Japan for invasion for 3 weeks was apparently mov ing back into waters near Tokyo lending weight to enemy reports of intensified preparations to meet assault waves on the shores of the homeland or China Latest bombardment the 2nd m 24 carried out Tues day morning by destroyers oper ating boldly in Suruga gulf 80 miles southwest of Tokyo They shelled Shimuzu Nippons greatest aluminum producing city only 45 miles northeast of Hamamatsu target of 16inch battleship guns 24 hours earlier Tokyo admitted one Shimuzu in dustrial plant was squarely hft The enemy radio said the bom bardment lasted only 5 minutes during which 90 shells were poured into the city The shelling came on the heels of a 13hour carrier plane raid over a 400 mile arc of Japans main island reaching from Tokyo hay to the Slaizuru naval base on the west coast of the Island Sixty vess6ls and 138 aircraft were de stroyed or damaged and at least 60 airfields bombcdpocked Simultaneous strikes by fighters and bombers from Okinawa and Iwo Jima added 40 more ocean go ing surface craft to the days ton Revised figures on last Satur days allied carrier sweep over the Inland sea and the huge Kure na val base listed 147 vessels and 292 aircraft wrecked including 2 air craft carriers damaged and a crui ser sunk which had not been pre viously listed Twenty more ships and surface croft destroyed or damaged dur I   

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