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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: July 18, 1945 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - July 18, 1945, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY ANO ARCHIVES I A THE NEWSPAPER THAT VOL LJ MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS INSIDE WASHINGTON Navy Brass Hats Fret About Overconfjdence By Central Press Capital Staff thing that is worrying Navy brass hats is that the American public will begin to feel we no longer need a gi gantic fleet now that the Japa nese navy has been virtually wiped out The Navy fears that the same thine will happen that occurred after World War I when Navy approp riations were cut to the bone That un doubtedly was behind the recent press confer ence held by Se cr et ary of the Navy James Forres tal at which Gen he had one battleship admiral a carrier ad miral and a highranking admiral from Pacific fleet headquarters explain the big job that still lies ahead for the Navy Army officers and fighting men agree with the Navy on 2 counts 1 that battleships are mighty comforting things to have around when they invade an island 2 that there is nothing like Navy dive bombing planes to take out bothersome enemy gun positions Associated Press and United Press Full Leased Wire Five Cents a Copy This Paper CorelsU ot Two SectionsSection Oat NO of QuickPeace in Pacific War Takes Beating From Military Experts Bv LYTK f ivirenv By LVLE C WILSON United Press Staff Correspondent Washington and lopes of quick peace in the Pacific ake a bad beating among military men here who believe Japan is ull of fight and must be invaded She has 5000000 well armed Iroops in the home islands and ibout 4000 first line fighter and wmber planes Japan also has an enormous store of infantry wea wns The consensus hereabouts is hat Japan still will fight despite Army Gen Dwight D Eisen howers contention that the Ger man general staff should be com pletely eliminated is likely to be translated into concrete action as Allied occupation of the Reich progresses As American member of the Allied Control council Eisenhow er will be in a position to put forward his views and as things shape up now there will be no one opposed to them Principal American foreign af fairs specialists endorse the gen erals views and Sumner Welles former undersecretary of state long has agitated to the same end Russia also is ready for the elimination of the German mili tarists and every one of Ger manys those that peacefully got along with Ger many mostof the are anxious to stamp out the Prus sian strain Polish acquisition of East Prussia is a step in that di rection An indication of the over whelming public sentiment be hind the Bretton Woods monetary agreements was uncovered by the House Banking and Currency committee During hearings by that group petitions letters and postcards poured in by the thousands When the communications were counted it was found that approximately 50000 had been received favoring ratification by Congress of the Bretton Woods agreement while less than 50 op posed it Clinton P Anderson new sec retary of agriculture is keenly interested in agricultural econ omics in any new byproducts which will build up agriculture Reporters who met with the cabinet officer on his first ultra busy day in office were surprised to find him looking over a car ton of chewing gum He explained that it was a new agricultural by product The former congressman laugh ingly denied that it was made from synthetic rubber Veieran senate newsmen dis agree with Majority Leader Al ben Barkleys estimate that there will not be more than a half doz en votes in the Senate against ratification of the United Nation charter Many of the reporters believe that thete will not be a single vote registered Pressure o public opinion is so great they explain that senators who don want to vote aye either wil absent themselves or merely vote present Secretary of Agriculture An derson is in the spot of a man asked to put up or shut up HI vigorously criticized the food policies as chairman of the House food committee but now finds himself running the show This explains the House ram page that altered the OPA exten sion bill to make Anderson food czar later Bum Steer Bremen gav Bob Hope a bum steer and hi opened his tour of Germany Tuesday night by referring to some 5000 battlehardened vet erans as occupation troops fighting words A protesting roar went up and Hope said meekly Well thats What they told me That fixed it He News London is the way the London Star began itsstory on Potsdam Wednesday Never has so little news been available about so much JKASON CITY IOWA WEDNESDAY JULY 18 1915 the astonishing failure to challenge our navys daringapproaches to her shore lines Thus the spectacular reports of Pacific fleet and air operations coupled with reports changes in President Trumans travel plans may prove to be less immediately significant than they appear in the headlines Another jolt to the optimists came Tuesday when it was reiterated here that occupa tion of Japan is fundamental in our war by in vasion unless the enemy leaders decide to call it quits before that but occupation in any event Many army and navy officers believe the invasion of Japan will be a tougher undertaking than the invasion of Europe The Japanese army is not rated on par with Germanys But the lay of the land in Japan is such as enormously to favor the defenders against at tackers coming over the beaches Japans home islands similar in some respects to Okinawa where marines and the army had to fight through hills and ridges to win An idea of Japanese to pography may be gained from the fact that railroads there average one bridge for every 4 miles of track It is no country for rolling armored advances such as Pattons men made through France or great enveloping movements such as swallowed German forces in the Ruhr It is estimated that the job of knocking out strategic targets jn Japan will take at least another 12 months of air bombardment In addition to the army of 5 000000 men at home Japan has another 5000000 healthy men who could be placed in the armed services arid about 3000000 more fit for limited service And in the empire there is known to be a vast supply of infantry the handiest type of defense con ceivable in the rough and ridged country which dominates most of the home islands It is estimated that Japan has 5000 to 9000 airplanes of somewhat fewer than 5000 are first line fighters or bombers Many of the others however would be suitable for suicide at tacks It is no secret now that the suicide pilots have done some for midable damage especially to our fleet In addition to the army in the home islands Japan has approxi mately 1000000 well trained and amply armed soldiers in Man churia Japanese military estab lishments there and generally on the continent of Asia have been largely selfsupporting The ex istence these large numbers ot enemy troops on the mainland will be something to think about even after Japan is invaded and licked Hardest hit so far is the Japa nese merchant fleet It originally was estimated at 8000000 tons It has been whittled by submarines air and surface attack to about 1800000 tons Even that shipping is largely immobilized by our air power NAVY BLASTS JAPAN 2ND DAY BIG 3 WILL GET PACIFIC WAR AS NO 1 PROBLEM Three Chiefs Limit First Discussions to Issues at Stake Polsdam big 3 meet ing was resumed Wednesday aft ernoon and President Truman was understood to have informed Pre mier Stalin and Prime Minister Churchill that he regards the war against Japan as the first problem of the conference In their 2nd joint meeting since the conference opened Tuesday the 3 chiefs of state were believed to be still limiting their discussions to preliminaries apparently estab lishing the order in which the high issues at stake will be resolved Mr Truman was scheduled to lunch with Churchill and pay a courtesy call on Stalin before the afternoon business session but there was no immediate word from the heavilyguarded com pound whether he had done so In his capacity as chairman of the meeting however Mr Tru man appeared to have already won a major point in forcing the Pa cific war to the top of the agenda Within a few hours after his first formal meeting with Prime Minister Churchill and Premier Stalin the Missonrian was under stood to have made clear the Amer ican position that the swift defeat of Japan is the principal issue confronting the united and particularly America Britain and Russia Mr Truman was scheduled to lunph with Churchill Wednesday after which he will call on Stalin It was understood that the pre liminary matters taken up Tues day will be discussed further Wednesday Mr Truman appointed chair man of the meeting by Churchill and Stalin stated his case at the first preliminary session in the new palace of Potsdam Tuesday afternoon A rigid censorship that evoked repeated protests from allied cor respondents on the scene blacked out all detailed information on Tuesdays 90minute meeting But it was learned that Mr TruT man without making any direct demands on Russia or Britain in formed his fellowconferees that the loss o lives in the Pacific must be ended as quickly as pos sible With that accomplished the foundation can be laid for a peace that will outlast generations to come the president said A brief official communique is sued at the close of Tuesdays meeting described that session as a preliminary exchange of views on matters requiring decision by the heads of the 3 states It was decided the communi que added that the 3 foreign secretaries James F Byrnes An thony Eden and Vyacheslav M Molotov should hold regular meetings with a view to preparing work of the conference Mr Truman with typical di rectness surprised both Stalin and Churchill Tuesday by plunging right into the business of the con ference as soon as he accepted the chairmanship Instead of going into the custo mary conference amenities Tru man picked up the accumulated agenda and started to work on it Conference officials still were adamant in their refusal to give any information on the progress of the meeting but correspondents were permitted to report that the 3 leaders set to work almost im mediately Mr Truman was said to have taken a liking to both Stalin and Churchill at his first contact with them Buy your War Bonds and Stamps from your GlobeGazette carrier boy Civilians Due for More Cut in Rail Travel Washington train travel already more of an ordeal than fun soon will become more uncomfortable than ever This prediction came from the office of defense transportation in connection with an order giving the military services first call on almost all passenger rolling stock AH passenger coaches baggage and express cars parjor and club cars lounge and observation cars and diners and dinercombination cars went into a pool to be avail able on demand for use of the armed forces The only exception is sleeping cars already eliminat ed on runs of 450 miles or less Further curtailment of civilian sleeper car service is expected within the next few months with another 1000 cars expected to be assigned for military use About twothirds of all Pullman sleepers are already in military service and the shift of another 1000 would leave only about 1500 in regular operation FftAiOPLlS TO HOLD POWER Madrid Generalissimo Francisco Franco Tuesday night proclaimed that he is only acting as head of the Spanish govern ment pending return to a mon archy would perpetuate falange ideals and the national syndicalist state In a 35minute speech to mem bers of the falange national coun cil Franco said Spain was enter ing the preparatory period for re turn of a monarchy but he did not say when the changeover would be made He declared the monarchy must guarantee Ihe of the falange move ment In Washington diplomats re garded Francos statement as a move designed to maintain him self in power and at the same time ride out criticism from the allied world and particularly Russia They said it was a ques tion whether this storm would be stirred possibly by Premier Stalin at the current Big 3 meet ing at a point where Franco would be blown out of power Senate Nips Plan to Stop Bretton Wood Washington senate re jected 52 to 31 Wednesday a pro posal by Senator Taft ROhio to put off action on Bretton Woods monetary legislation until after a new international conference Taft proposed that consideration of the hooscapproved bill be de layed until Nov 15 to await the calling of a world trade confer ence by the social and economic council of the projected united na lions organization Democratic Leader Barkley Ky said however that nations must make their commitments to the fund and bank proposed unde the bill by Dec 31 or the interna tional monetary agreement will lapse The motion made by the sena tor from Ohio is in effect an ef fort to kill the entire Bretton Woods agreement Barkley de clared Await Truman Approval for Veterans Hospital Grand Forks N Dak Grand Forks Wednesday awaited official confirmation by President Truman that a veterans hospital would be built here following m announcement Tuesday by Sen Milton R Young Japanese War to Front stand together before the opening session of their helm palace at Potsdam Germany AP wirephoto and Prime Minister Churchill conference at the Kaiser Wil WAR AT A GLANCE By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Radio Tokyo announced that 500 AmericanBritish carrier force planes resumed attacks on central Honshu island under improved weather conditions The air attack succeeded a heavy battleship shelling of Hitachi 80 miles northeast of Tokyo midnight Tuesday bea 130 river boats and small vessels were sunk in action ranging from China to Japan Australians met stiff resistance approaching Sambodia oil lCi Urtl China Chinese forces nearcd Kweilin former U S air 32 westfl kVay railroad and 12 u miles from the POSTPONE TRIAL OF HAW HAW London Old Bailey justice Wednesday postponed the treason trial of William Joyce the infamous Lord Haw Haw until Sept 11 and Joyces coun sel indicated that he will attempt to prove Joyce is the son of an American and therefore owed no allegiance to Britains king Joyce stood by while his coun sel Derek CurtisBennett made the application for postponement The attorney said it was neces sary for someone to go to the United States to see the original documents so that under oath the evidence might be brought into court in admissable form Curtis Bennett said it will be our submission that if Joyce was bom in the United States he can not owe allegiance to the king Weather Report FORECAST Iowa Partly cloudy Wednesday Wednesday night and Thursday Scattered thundershowers in northwest portion Wednesday night and in west and central portion Thursday Warmer Wednesday Cooler in north west portion Thursday Minnesota Generally fair in south and partly cloudy in north por tions Wednesday night and Thursday no material change in temperature IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Tuesday Minimum Tuesday 58 At 8 a m Wednesday 62 YEAR AGO Maximum go Minimum 57 Precipitation 14 Senate Split 31 Favoring Peace Charter Washington senates 4 remaining veterans of the od league of nations fight are split 3 to 1 in favor of the united na tions charter a survey showed Wednesday The lineup was just the other way around 25 years ago The 4 veterans of the league fight are Sens Kenneth D Mc Kellar D David I Walsh D Arthur Capper K Kansl and Hiram Johnson K McKellar Walsh and Capper said they would vote for senate ratification of the new plan for a world organization to keep the peace with force if necessary Johnson a leader of the league opposition 25 years agowent on record against the new treaty He gave no reason but promised a statement on the subject lator The new lineup means a shift for Walsh and Capper from the positions they took during the league fight in 191920 At that time they both support ed reservations to the league of nations covenant in the Versailles treaty Both voted against ratifi cation without the reservations Johnson voted against the treaty with or without reserva tions McKellar voted for the treaty and against all reserva tions Walsh said he did not believe any reservations would be offered to the new charter and that he would vote for its ratification without qualifications Plan Funeral Red Wing Minn rites were planned Wednesday for Alfred Staffenhagen 33 Dronten ac Minn whose body was recov ered from Lake Pepin after a 3 day search 3 MONTH BABY LOST IN CRASH Mother Loses Child as Bus Plunges Stream Uichmond Va 3month old baby was missing Wednesday after a Greyhound bus plunged from a weakened bridge into rain swollen Glillics creek within the Richmond city limits Hospital authorities said the other 45 passengers and the bus driver had been rescued They were treated for shock and ex posure at local hospitals None was injured The mother of the missing babv told rescue workers that she holding the child in her arms when she climbed out a bus window to the top of the vehicle She said she lost tho baby while the passengers were standing on 1he crowded top of the submerged bus waiting for rescue Congress May Favor Cut in Surplus Board Washington evi denced a generally receptive mood Wednesday for President Tru mans recommendation that sur lus property disposal be placed ndeione man However despite a presidential warning that surpluses are mount US rapidly there appeared little ikelihood of final action before October The assumption of most ligisla lors is that the job will go to W Stuart Symington St Louis busi icss man and Mr Trumans one appointee to the present 3member aoard Lt Col Edward Heller of Cali fornja and former Gov Robert A Hurley of Connecticut the other members were appointed by the late President Roosevelt Any substantial opposition the presidential proposal may run into will be in the senate When the surplus property law was enacted last fall the house voted for I man administration but the senate insisted on control by a board ol 5 The 3member group finally was agreed upon as a compromise Senator Ferguson RMieh said he thought the difficulty in the present board operations had been due o restrictions placed on it by the executive department What congress wanted was for the board to be in complete charge he commented As it is it has to go to other agencies un der what they call cooperation The present boards policy making has Been marked by disa greements Former Senator Guy M Gillette of Iowa resigned as chairman when he found himself unable to go along with decisions by the other members William L Clayton quit an earlier assign ment terming the board setup unworkable VOTE LEOPOLD EXILE BY LAW Brussels HI kin of the Belgians who refused t abdicate voluntarily was made ai exile by law Wednesday by par liament The Belgian senate passed 77 I 58 the measure already approvec by the chamber of deputies whicl prevents the absent king from re turning to the throne until parlia mcnt consents Buy your War Bonds and Stamps from your GlobeGazctfe carrier boy FLEET STANDS 80 MILES OFF TOKYOS SHORE U S British Carrier Planes Rake Military Points Near Capital By LEONARD nnLLtMAIV Associated Tress War Editor Japanese broadcasts reported allied carrier attacks and naval bombardments ripped up military defenses and war industries vithin 80 miles of Tokyo Wed nesday for the second successive day London reported hearing a Tokyo broadcast that 16 warships shelled the east coast of Honshu slaud for about an hour at noon Wednesday This would be a re jeat performance of a midnight larragc that poured more than 2000 tons into a 20 mile stretch f the vulnerable Japanese coast line northeast of Tokyo At least 500 carrier planes from the great U S and British Pacific fleets capable of putting 1500 aircraft into the air raked airdromes military installations and cities on 3 sides of Tokyo for 3 hours and were still coming over in midafternoon the enemy radio said The strike began at noon Tokyo time but could match Tuesdays daylong attack by 1500 aircraft No Withdrawal San Francisco UK Gen Yasuji Okamura supreme com mander of Japanese expedition ary forces in China said Wednes day a withdrawal of Japanese troops from China was inadvis able because it would necessitate an armistice with Chungking and the United States according to Tokyo Radio Deployment Timetable Paris UR Wednesdays rede ployment timetable of U S army divisions 2nd Infanlry On high seas first elements scheduled to reach Unit ed States early next week 5th Infantry On high seas should start arriving in about week 44th Infantry Scheduled to ar rive in New York aboard Queen Elizabeth Thursday 13th Armored Bulk now cleared Le Havre final units scheduled to leave Thursday 20th Armored Advance party on high seas remainder reached Le Havre Jast staging area for shipment this weekend 28th Infantry Advance party on high seas remainder reached Le Havre Tuesday night 30th Infantry Advance unit scheduled to clear Le Havre Mon day bulk of division being pro cessed at Camp Oklahoma City in Reims area 35th Infantry Advance party should clear Le Havre Sunday main body being processed ii Reims area 45th Infantry Advance units at Reims remainder expected ther Monday Advance parties of 44th infan try 2nd infantry 5th infantry and 13th armored divisions home 9th Army Headquarters Ad vance units cleared Le Havre Wednesday remainder cxpectec to leave Saturday Adolf and Eva Back Again TII By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Adolf Hitler variously reported dead or escaped to one place or ther was brought back in the aoin it er Folowlnr following in the news again Wednesday by a repor up residence on an island in the Antarctic a statement by Cesar Ameghino Argentine foreign truth in a pablished rumar hat HUIe reached Argentina by the German sub T j tut mail 1530 and were living in Patagonia the French BrazzaviH Tho thc palr were in lhe Antarctic Scan news a 8ht byNBC quoted the South Braun had taken refuge on Queen Maude a former fo Uerman Antarctic explorers after being landed by the U530 which surrendered last week to Argentine authorities Landbased aircraft filled in the japs Tokyo reported 83 bombers and fighters raided southern Japan Wednesday morning a handful of navy patrol bombers hit Honshu island south of Tokyo and 30 Superforts flew widely over the islands during the night scouting and dropping propaganda leaflets Liberators and Black Widow night fighters struck at the Industrial coast 55 to 80 miles northeast of Tokyo Tuesday night before the AmericanBritish bom bardment fleet moved in Led hy the 4500 ton U S battleship Iowa and the British King George V allied fleet units steamed in through mist and rains to within 6 miles of shore and for an hour poured more than tons of hot steel into factories and military installations Associated Press war correspon dent James Lindsley who watched the shelling said a copper refin ery steel engineering and arms plants in the Hitachi area were transformed into rubble before the mightly warfleet turned and sped away shortly after midnight There was no sign of Japanese op position Tokyo explained the Japanese were preserving their strength until the time is ripe when they will deliver a knockout blow to allied naval and invasion forces Japanese propagandists warned that allied bombardment and car rier forces would be back again and strike wherever they wished admitted the Japanese were terri fied by the bombardment they called upon the government to give the people capable leader ship and for the Nipponese themselves to meet the bombard ments without fear Tokyo said the midnight bom bardment reaching from Hitachi to Mito was smaller than the 2 previous shellings of northern Japan which drove residents ot Kamaishi into air raid shelters where many remained long after the enemy warships had retired unable to shake off Carrier planes included Tues day nights bombardment area in Wednesdays targets Landbased aircraft combined with PT boats to sink or damage   

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