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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: July 17, 1945 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - July 17, 1945, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME VOL U THE NEWSFAKX THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS Associated Press and United Press Full Leased Wire INSIDE WASHINGTON Writer Thinks Arnolds Will Miss Public Life By HELEN ESSABY Central Press Columnist make up my mind whether or not it was smart for Thurman Arnold to re sign as justice of the United States court of appeals to go into private law practice a year retainer Undoubtedly there is a greater financial future in private law practice than in sitting on the honorable court but I hate to see a personality as vivid as the Wy oming professor hidden in a com monplace job It was so entertaining to watch the brilliant Arnold throw him self dramatically at trust busting and a dozen other crusades Ar nold and his charming Frances wiU soon be bored outside the aura of official life Some people say the resigna tion of the justice is a step back to Wyoming and the race lor a senatorship from Laramie I am inclined to believe this possibility I cant imagine Thurman with his ieet on a desk behind a legal shingle on the door patiently waiting lor clients to ask for ad Vice Ill miss the newlyresigned Justice Owen Roberts sitting on the supreme court in an Olympian row of the United States Ill also miss meeting the justice with his grandchildren in the elevator of our apartment building The last time I saw Mrs Roberts she had paused in the apartment lobby to help Betty Pulbright wife of the Arkansas senator adjust roller skates oh the Fulbright daughters I was on my way to a newspa per tea in honor of Mrs Truman Wish I were going with you said Mrs Roberts Youll be sure to have fun Mrs Roberts sighed a little It does get a little monot onous sometimes having to as sociate principally with members of onr own profession Why do people think the judiciary wants to stay remote from the rest ol the world So you see the supreme court had its lonely moments It looks like a place in heaven to the stu dent in a law school But it is an honor that demands a price This Paper Consists ol Two SecUonsSectlon On MASON CITT IOWA TUESDAY JULY IT 1945 will be labeled arbitrator of the ladies coat and suit industry in New Xork man who was clos estfriend and adviser to one of the most extraordinary of all American presidents mediator be tween Stalin and Churchill suc ceeding to the post held by the airy Jimmy Walker one time handshaking mayor of New York How clever President Truman 5s He used Hopkins for whatever value he had to the new admin istration gave him a polite salvo of applause for his successful con versations with Stalin And now Hopkins steps Mr Truman who used to a mild fellow until you looked at mouth and square jaw may be one of the toughest presi dents the country ever had He means to run his end of the gov ernment of the United States and the large area they include as he sees fit without regard to preju dice or Roosevelt customs Soon there wont be a familiar face in the executive branch of gov ernment except that of Mr Tru man and Secretary Byrnes Hundreds of reserve officers in the army and navy are looking for new berths as the day of de tachment from the military ap proaches Within another month there will be about half the present number of uniforms on the Wash ington streets at each work day afternoon It takes less than a minute to escape from the desks Ore closing second arrives Many of the reserve officers are settling in Washington Capitalitis is a germ that generally grows into a permanent affliction Have you ever heard of anybody deliberate ly leaving Washington after a taste of its hodgepodgy whirl Great Lakes Luxury Liner Burns at Dock Saraia Ont 360foot Great Lakes passenger liner Ha mome carrying 255 passengers was destroyed by fire Tuesday with many persons injured and burned but a clerk at the Canada Steamship lines said As far as we know no lives have been lost A survey of Sarnla General hos pital the Firmer Corp first aid hospital and some private homes nearby indicated that at least ISO persons haa been treated for burns and other injuries The liner one oJ the largest on the Great Lakes burst into flames when a blaze jumped from a freight shed at the dock Within 5 minutes the super structure of the ship was a mass of fire sending many of the 255 passengers overboard Some jumped into scows others leaped into the water as panic overcame the passengers NO 241 m the historic conference now going on in Berlin once the capital of nazi Germanyare seen in these pictures first to reach the U S Atleft President Truman alights from his plane at Gatow airport after flying from Antwerp Bel gium debarkation port for the cruiser Augusta on which he made the Atlantic crossing At the round table in cen ter situated in Kaiser Wilhelms former castle in suburban Potsdam the allied leaders will confer in talks that may Fleet 80 M shorten the Pacific war and decide woilds fate for years to come Chairs whichPresident Truman Prime Minister Unurchill and Premier Stalin will occupy are designated bv their initials At right Prime Minister Churchill descends stairs from his plane Premier Stalin arrived by train President Truman in Conference With Stalin Big 3 Meeting Opens Doors After Delay BULLETIN London Moscow reported Tuesday nighfrjthat the biff 3 conference opened at 3 p m Tuesday at Potsdam with Presi dent Truman presiding Potsdam ff Premier Stalin conferred with President Truman at the little white house Tuesday in company with their ranking foreign affairs officials a few hours before the worldshaping Big 3 conference was scheduled to start The generalissimo attired as a marshal of the soviet union was accompanied by Foreign Commis sar Vyacheslav Molotov They were guests at luncheon of the president and Secretary of State James F Byrnes The party talked for an hour The atmosphere of secrecy sur rounding the delayed start of the conference with Prime Minister Churchill was heightened during the murky cloudy morning by 3 mysterious explosions in the Rus sian zone of Berlin The 2 soviet leaders arrived in Potsdam 2 days ago it was dis closed There was no explanation however why the opening of the conference had been delayed Monday The Russians appeared at Mr Trumans residence at a m with their official interpreter V N Pavlov and were greeted by the presidents military and naval aides and then by Mr Truman and his secretary of state in their off ices on the 2nd floor Charles E Bohlen of the state department was the American in terpreter Pavlov has accompanied Stalin to all the previous Big 3 meetings The 6 were together for an hour before going to lunch Mr Truman had seen Prime Minister Churchill informally Monday when the British leader called to pay his respects The luncheon was concluded p m The menu included creamed spinach fried liver and bacon smothered with onions baked ham Julienne potatoes string beans pumpernickel bread jam sliced fruit cookies mint candies and cigars Truman directed Vice Adm Em ory S Land chief of the U S maritime commission to proceed to Germany as soon as possible indicating that postwar world nPPlgC4ad of the United States greatest merchant fleet in history would play a part in the discussions Secretary of War Henry L Stimson and Gen Henry H Ar nold chief of the U S army air forces are now on the conference scene The presidents call for Adm Land came as no surprise In pre conference discussions with his staff before he left Washington Truman decided to direct the top shipping official to stand by and be prepared to join the big 3 par ley Land attended the Roosevelt Churchill Quebec discussions and furnished advice at later bie 3 meetings MYSTERY BLAST SHAKES BERLIN Explosions Felt in ig Berlin ffjiThree terrific ex plosions apparently emanating from the Russian zone of occupa tion rocked Berlin and Potsdam early Tuesday morning and still I were unofficially explained at noon r The blasts rattled windows In the area where President Truman and Prime Minister Churchill are quartered for the big three con ferences and caused bombweary Berliners to cast apprehensive glances skyward American officers charged with security in this sector said they had received no reports on the cause of the blasts but added that the Russians had been doing con siderable demolition work and that the explosions might be con nected The first blast occurred about 0 a m and the other two at 1 hour intervals Truman Asks Congress for Une Man to Direct Surplus War Property of Government GHOST PLANE STILL UNFOUND Grand Rapids Minn wreckage of a B29 Superfortress abandoned in the air when escap ing gas fumes threatened to asphyxiate its crew was sought Tuesday throughout the Pacific northwest The 11 crew members rescued after parachuting to safety over the northern Minnesota wood lands expressed belief that the giant aircraft had plowed into the earth at some uninhabited spot east of the Rockies They said the fuel tank held enough gasoline to carry the ship to the Pacific ocean but doubted that the planes altitude was suf ficient to clear the mountains CoPilot 2nd Lt W C Memke Ottumwa Iowa said the plane was flying at about 9000 feet when the men decided to bail out It didnt have enough altitude to clear the mountains but it should have remained in the air for a few hours Memke said If it had landed in a populated area wed have heard of it by now The engineer 2nd U K C Hudson Thomasville N Car al ready had been overcome by fumes when the other crew mem bers rigged his parachute to open and tossed him over the planes side He revived when he hit the air and landed unharmed NO COVERAGE Berlin OJR Lieut Col John Redding U S army public rela tions officer announced Tuesday that the Big 3 had decided to ad here to their original decision that there be no coverage of the con ference by correspondents Buy your War Bonds and Stamps from your GlobeGazette carrier boy UW President Truman Tuesday to scrap the 3man surplus prop erty board and authorize appoint ment of a single official to direct the vast job of handling the gov ernments surpluswar property Experience has shown that the job should be centralized under a single head Mr Truman said in a special message to congress The program now is adminis tered by a 3man board Its new chairman W Stuart Symington of St Louis took his oath of office only Monday It was believed that tt administrator Air Truman prob ably would pick Symington for the job Other members of the present board are Robert A Hurley for mer governor of Connecticut and Lt Col Edward Heller California businessman Mr Truman said that adminis tration of the surplus disposal job by a multimember board has complicated daytoday opera tions under the surplus property act American Communists Set to Kick Out Earl Browder EARL BROWDEK BELGIANS VOTE LEOPOLD OUT Brussels The Belgian chamber of deputies voted Tues day to prevent King Leopold from reassuming the throne until he is given parliamentary consent The vote was 98 to 6 with 32 mem bers abstaining from voting The bill introduced by Prime Minister AchiUe Van Acker now goes to the senate probably Wednesday The action was taken after Van Acker read a letter from Leopold saying he would bow to the will of the that he wished a plebiscite held upon whether he should retain his throne The king is staying in Bavaria Funeral for Vet Springfield Mo services will be held Wednesday for the Rev Thomas Huston Wiles first national chaplain of the American Legion who died Monday night of a heart attack He was 61 years old Party Also Plans to Bore Into Labor In Class War Move Washington UP American communists are about to boot Earl Browder out of the party command in a maneuver toward resuming the class war they aban doned nearly 2 years ago under his leadership Browder persuaded the party to give up its active political status and to become the communist po litical association It was his the ory that all elements of the popu lation of the United Stales could live work and prosper together Other communists challenged Browder Now after more than a month of public discussion in the com munist press these developments appear to be likely 1 Removal of Browder and se lection of an advocate of the class struggle as American communist leader William Z Foster a vet eran of the movement seems to be a likely successor 2 Abandonment of the politi cal association type of organi zation in favor of a regularly or ganized political parly 3 An aggressive communist boring into all mass organizations labor unions All the foregoing is in the dis cussion stage and awaits final de cision by a communist convention But the trend of communist sym pathy is clearly evident in the or ganizations daily and weekly press Columns discussion have been printed with little if any dis agreement with the argument that communists had better get back into the class struggle business and do it quickly ARMY POOLS TRAIN COACHES Washington railway passenger coaches Tuesday were placed in a pool to be available for use by the armed services NAVY FLYERS GET 374 SHIPS 129 Locomotives Also Knocked Out byRaiders Guam carrier planes destroyed or damaged 374 Japanese vessels and 129 locomo tives in a fantastically successful 2day sweep over northern Japan last weekend Adm Chester W NimitE announced Tuesday The revised toli of carrier dam age last Saturday and Sunday in cluded ships and surface craft totaling 71000 tons and in cluding 9 small warships vessels totaling 88000 tons and including 10 war craft Eightyfour locomotives were destroyed 45 damaged Military installations ammunition dumps air fields factories and transpor tation facilities were wrecked on northern Honshu main island of Japan and Hokkaido Thirtyseven Japanese planes were destroyed and 45 damaged This is 10 lower than the previ ously announced total but an in crease of 8 in the number de stroyed The tabulation of Japanese ship ping losses in the 2 days showed old destroyer 2 de stroyer escorts 2 patrol craft 4 picket craft 25 cargo ships 6 train ferries one oiler 3 tugs 59 lugers and 37 other craft destroyer es corts or gunboats 3 patrol craSt one transport 34 cargo ships 9 oilers 3 train ferries one LST landing ship one tug one trawler one dredge and barge 8G luggers and 87 smaller craft Receives Flying Cross Washington Arthur E Exon of Estherville Iowa re ceived the distinguished flying cross Monday as 22 Americans were decorated on behalf of King George VI by Earl of Halifax British rmbassador Weather Report FORECAST Mason City Cloudy with occa sional showers Tuesday night Wednesday partly cloudy No decided change in temperatures Iowa Mostly cloudy Tuesday and Tuesday night with scattered thundershowers Temperatures will average 5 to 8 degrees be low normal becoming cooler Wednesday and Thursday warmer Friday and Saturday and cool again by Sunday cloudy Tues day and Wednesday Scattered showers south portions Tuesday night and east central portions Wednesday morning Not much change in temperature IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Monday 73 Minimum Monday 60 At 8 a m Tuesday 60 Precipitation 97 inch YEAR AGO Maximum Minimum 62 Blasts After 1500 Airplane Raid Guam daring American naval task force steamed to with in 80 miles of Tokyo Tuesday night Japan time and bom barded industrial targets around Hitachi on the heels of an 8 hour raid by 1500 planes trom Ameri can and British carrier planes in the aiSKViW the 3apanMse capital Adm Chester W imitz an nounced the bombardment while it was still underway only a few hours after he reported carrier Planes had knocked out 374 Nip ponese vessels and 129 locomo tives in their weekend sweep over northern Japan The new battleship Iowa with her blazing 16inch guns led the bombardment group in the closest approach of any U S naval task force to the Japanese capital A curtain of steel from the Iowa and supporting cruisers and de stroyers hammered at Hitachis vital copper smelter and aircraft parts plants previous target of Marianasbased Superforts which sent nearly 500 planes lashing at 1 other Nipponese cities Tuesday It was the third naval bombard ment of Japans vulnerable coastal industries within 4 days The Iowa presumably led the bom bardment ships in close to shore for the night attack against the industrial plants which lie about a mite off the coast In a week Admiral William F Bull Ualseys third fleet has ranged from Tokyo to the north ern end of Japan and hack again smashing with bombs and shells vitally important steel munitions and oi plants shipping and rail transportation and airdromes Japan has taken it all help lessly without offering more than token resistance Tuesdays unprecedented assault on the Tokyo area was part of a preinvasion attack involving 2000 or more allied planes ranging from stubby little fighters to giant Superforts It was the first combined Amer icanBritish operation against the Japanese homeland and the fourth carrier strike in eight days includ ing the SaturdaySunday attack on northern Japan in coordina tion with naval bombardments which crippled the steel mill cities of Muroran and Kamaishi The weekend airsea bombard ment was the most damaging blow the fleet has dealt the Japa nese homeland Vice Aim John S McCains carrier planes caught hundreds of ships and surface craft scurry ing out of harbors like ants But 374 didnt get away As a result reliable estimates Placed Nippons remaining usable shipping at less than 2000000 tons The enemys always inade quate rail transport was dealt an equally heavy blow N Y PAPER STRIKE ENDS New York Waldman counsel for the newspaper and mail deliverers union announced Tuesday that the 17 day strike against New York City publish ers had been settled and that trucks will be rolling within an hour TRAIN JUMPS TRACKS AFTER RA1NATDIMAP City of Los Angeles Derailed No Serious Injuries Reported Dunlap Iowa cars on the eastbound Union Pa cific streamliner City of Los An geles jumped the track 3 miles east of Dunlap after a cloudburst early Tuesday and one din into the nearby Boyer river with 3 persons aboard The 2 conductors and a waiter escaped as one end of the car sank into the river and the end lodged on the nearby bank Justice Frank Murphy of the United States supreme court was a passenger on the train but ap parently escaped injury When he did not answer a call at his com partment other passengers in the car old a reporter he was not in jured and that he was resting Included among the derailed cars were 8 sleepers and 2 coaches Officials of the North Western railroad over whose tracks the train runs in this area said no one suffered more than minor injuries There were about 200 passengers aboard Except for the diner the other derailed cars remained up right close to the scene of the mis hap The diner the motor unit and baggage car plunged on down the track about half a mile before the diner wobbling because of a broken rear truck struck the river bridge abutment broke loose and dropped into the water The motor unit and baggage car stayed on the track A reporter who visited the scene soon after the wreck sjjid he had been told the train was half an hour late and that it was traveling at a high speed when it hit a washout at a m caused by a inch rain Although the derailed cars cleared the westbound North Western tracks another heavy rain in the Denison area brought so much water down upon the Dunlap area that the westbound track could not be used and rail traffic along the line was halted A relief sent to Bun Blurtsto lake me passengers cii oChicago the trams destination jlsscjon as the track could be repaired Work men were out on the tracks within a short time after the mishap but Humphreys said it was impossible to determine immediately how the track could be repaired IOWAWARSHIP REPORTS FIGHT Guam bombardment of Japans important industrial city of Hitachi by warships of the mighty American 3rd fleet was reported by radio broadcast from the superbattleship Iowa while the attack was in progress The Iowa said the Yank men ofwar opened the bombardment on this vital industrial center 80 miles northeast of Tokyo at 11 p m Japanese time This was the first time that a fleet assault on the Japanese homeland was reported to the American people while shells were actually ripping into fac tories and railroads Deployment Timetable Paris VJPJ Tuesdays rede ployment timetable of U S army divisions 4th 8th and 87th infantry In United States 2nd infantry On high seas units should start arriving in United States early next week 5th infantry On high seas should reach port in about a week 44th infantry Scheduled to reach New York on Queen Eliza beth Thursday 13th armored Began moving out of Le Havre last weekend en tire division scheduled to be out by Thursday 20th armored Advance party on high seas remainder being pro cessed in Le Havre staging area for embarkation late this week 28th infantry Advance units on high seas main body moving into Le Havre staging area Tuesday 30th infantry Advance party scheduled to clear Le Havre soon bulk of division being processed at Camp Oklahoma City Reims area 35th infantry Advance party being processed in Reims area main botiy slated to arrive Wednesday 45th infantry Advance units being processed in Reims area re mainder scheduled to arrive there next weekend Advance parties of 44th 2nd and 5th infantry and 13th armored in United States WACs AT PHONES Washington WACs have been assigned to tel ephone siwtchboard duty at the big 3 conference at Potsdam the war department reported Tues day   

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