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Mason City Globe Gazette: Saturday, July 14, 1945 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - July 14, 1945, Mason City, Iowa                                NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME Of HISTORY AND M01NE5 THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS Prm md uniud wirq Ttve a Copy MASON CITY IOWA SATURDAY JULY 14 U S NAVY STRIKES JAPANS HEART INSIDE WASHINGTON Ambassador May Be Man Without a Country By Central Press Capital Staff fickle for tunes of war have playBd strange tricks on diplomats stationed in TYashington Probably the next to be affected will be Polish Am bassador Jan Ceichenowski who represented the London Polish government which Russia has re fused to recognize Ceichenowski Undoubtedly will be given his passport once the Allies agree on a new Polish government And he may become a man without a country Another whose popularity rose to a crest when bis country was invaded Is former Ambassador Fetich of Yugoslavia He still is in this country because proTito forceswhich the United States now recognizes bitterly criticized him while fighting to take the leadership away from Mikailo Perhaps to be pitied most is HjaJmar J Procope who was the toast of every cocktail party until Russia invaded his tiny Finland Procope is in Sweden living in a modest apartment Watch for zovernment action to check real estate salesand pre vent inflation from breaking through in that market Consideration is being given in government and congressional circles to a provision that a 50 per cent down payment be required before real property can change hands If this or some similarmeasure is imposed it will put a drastic brake on the purchase of homes and other real estate Government stabilization officials however areconcerned about the prospect of a land and real property boom They recall the land fiasco which followed World war 1 and its con sequences The full real story of Americas successful submarine campaign tola reven after hostilities cease in the Pacific Tohighrankingr navy menthe whole undersea campaign is in the secret weapon category and perhaps rightfully so Very little has appeared in print or in the mo vies about American subs al though they have done one of the greatest jobs of the war This is tough on the sub of ficers and enlisted men but most of them realize the importance ol keeping their tactics and strategy secret Result Some of the most thrill ing stories of the war are gather ing dust in navy files marked se cret One of the first efforts of Paul M Herzog new chairman of the National Labor Relations board is expected to be directed towarc depersonalizing that embattled agency As chairman of the NEW Xork State Laborboard Herzog never stifled dissenting opinions but he ran the board much like a court keeping personalities and quarrel oat of the limelight His friends say he hopes to do the same thing at NLRB Board members will arriveat theirdecisions and thresh out dis agreements quietly and privately and present NLRB to the public as a board and not 3 distinct pcr sonalities Previously former Chairman Harry Millis and Mem ber John Houston voted together regularly Gerald Reilly was usu ally in the minority Their difference in viewpoint well advertised and the pub lic looked upon the NLRB as a di vided agency predicting its de cision in almost every case from the line of questioning at public hearings Carroll Plans Show Carroll annual horst show will be opened July 25 by Gov Robert D Blue it was an nounced Friday by Larry Jung secretary of the show committee Former Gov B B Hickenlooper opened the show in 1943 and 1944 Weather Report FORECAST Mason City Partly cloudy Satur day night and Sunday Warme Sunday Probably thuudershow ers Sunday night Partly cloudy through Sun day scattered thundershower south portion Saturday morn ing and west portion Sunday af ternoon No important change in temperature Minnesota Partly cloudy Satur day night and Sunday with scattered thunder showers Sun day afternoon Warmer Sunday IN MASON C1T1 GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Friday 73 Minimum Friday 53 At 8 a m Saturday 60 Precipitation 13 inch YEAR AGO ilaximum 84 59 INDEPENDENCE OFRB LAIRD CAUSES OUSTER Failure to Consult Iowa Governor on Hiring Started Dispute Des Moines a for mer republican legislator a job vithout consulting the chief ex ecutive was one of the matters on vhich Gov Robert D Blue took ssue with State Public Safety Commissioner R B Laird Sidney republican when he fired him Laird declared The legislator was identified by Laird as State Senator Frank D Martin Davenport whom he ap pointed last spring as an inspector n the motor vehicle llartin resigned his legislative post to take the job Lairds disclosure of what apr peared to be a possible intraparty eud followedannouncement by Slue ol the appointment of Sher iff Fred Wilkins of Boohe to succeed him effective Sunday Wilkins will serve on acting status as did Laird pending the return of Major Karl W Fischer Vinton republican who is sta tioned in Italy Fischer whose 4year term as commissioner is scheduled to expire July 1 1947 is on an indefinite leave of ab ence When the governor called me up last Saturday and told me he had some bad news hiring Mar tin was one of the things he toimd wrong wilh ray office Laird said in an interview He said I had appointed a sen ator to me and I hadnt come up and asked him whether he Martin was for him Blue or against him During the 1944 primary elec tion campaign Blues ppp onenl for the republican gubernatorial nomination was Henry W Burma Allison sheriff of Butler county for 14 years who generally was conceded to have the support of most law enforcement officials in the state Martin formerly served as Scott county sheriff Another objection which Laird said Blue voiced was that the commissioner gave out too much publicity to the press The ousted official asserted that those were virtually the only specific complaints which Blue made about his operations The governor told reporters the change was made in the best in terest of the administration of the department but declined to elab orate Laird indicated Friday he might seek an attorney generals opinion on the legality of his ouster but Saturday he said he had decided not to do so The commissioner heads oneof the largest departments of state government including the pow erful bureau of criminal investi gation and highway patrol There are approximately 240 employes in the department and the com missioner is paid annually Bny your War Bonds and Stamps from your GlobeGazette carrier boy NEWSPAPER STRIKER TANGLES WITH striking newspaper delivery man tangles with a youth in New York City as he tries to stop the boy from selling papers The striker bites the wrist of the youth as he tries to free himself from an armlock around his neck CIO United Rubber Workers at Firestone Obey Board Order to Return to Work BULLETIN Akron Ohio The 165flO CIOTJnited Kubber Workers at the Firestone Tireand Rubber company Saturday voted 3 to 1 to obey a national war labor board order to return to work Monday 1B Ike Watson local presi dent of the CIOUKW said the to board directive at a 4 hour meet ins of the membership The board previously had or dered unionists to end the 14 day strike Monday precipitated by a contract renewal disagreement or face Joss of revocation of vaca tion swift premium and main tenance of membership benefits which it previously granted them Work stoppages fanned by la bor disputes spread over a wide section of the country Saturday hitting a new high for the past several weeks There was trouble along the la bor fronts in at least 27 cities from Minnesota to the Atlantic coast and south into Florida and Alabama The number of idle touched around the 50000 mark an increase over the number in strikes and walkouts a week ago There were several new dis putes reported during the last 24 hours Settlements were reported in 3 stoppages but the number of workers removed from the strike lines totaled only about 1000 OX the approximately 50000 men and women away from their jobs over labor controversies more than 9000 were coal miners in Illinois Pennsylvania Ohio and Kentucky The latest walkout of coal min ers was by 2700 employes of 4 miles of the Consolidated Coal Co in Jenkins Ky President Sam Caddy ol districfSO United Mine Workers of America said the walkout followed some trouble between aforeman and his crew1 The newspaper industry also was hit by the disputes strikes aha walkouts public atioii of 7 Ha per s in 4 cities and stopping delivery of 14 major New York City papers Papers suspending publication because of labor dis putes included 3 in Birmingham Ala 2 in Fort Wayne Ind and 1 each in Jersey City and Bayonne N J Return of strikers in the Gen eral Tire and Rubber Co eased Akrons chaotic labor situation after a 14day strike of 16500 Firestone CIQUnited Hubbei workers failed Friday night t gain endorsement of the citys 90 000 ClOIndustrial Union Counci members Full operations were resumed it all General tire departments Sat urday except the pitcuring sec tion where 50 per cent or more of 150 striking workers returnee to their jobs Friday night Thirty men began the walkout Friday in protest against a new wage rate a company spokesman said Local URWA officials said the strikers voted to return to work Friday night at a membershi meeting after most ol the plant 2400 employes were made idle by the production bottleneck which jammed other departments will unfinished products Buy your War Bonds and Stamps from your GloheGazeftc carrier boy TRUMAN NEARS ANTWERP PORT President Will Fly to Big 3 Meeting BULLETIN Antwerp Tru man aboard the cruiser Augusta was expected to dock at 8 a m 2 a m EWT Sunday Aboard Cruiser Augusta With President Truman fi Seven British men of war loomed up out of the mistshrouded English channel Saturday to escort Presi dent Trumans cruiserborne party to Antwerp Fromthere the 31esident will fly to Potsdam for nis first big 3 meeting with Prime Minister Churchill and Marshal Stalin Mr Truman was on the Au ustas bridge when the rendez vous was joined with the British cruiser Birmingham and of his majestys destroyers At 7 a m Greenwich meantime the Birmingham and her accom panying destroyers were sighted on calm but misty waters The destroyers took their places three on each side of the Augusta and her companion ship the Phil adelphia turning about with a precision comparable to parade ground maneuvers of smart ca dets The Birmingham with Rear Admiral CunninghamGraham aboard encircled the presidents ship all of her seamen standing at attention along her rails After this formal greeting she raced quickly ahead to take her place in front the Philadelphia to lead the procession past Lands End and the historic cliffs of Dover One of the destroyers put out a small boat which bounced over to the Augusta with a mail pouch from the white house Two floating mines which had broken from their moorings were sighted nearthe formation Upon arrival at Antwerp Presi dent Truman will motor to Brus sels and there take off in his big C54 plane for Polsdam and his first meeting with Prime Ministei Churchill and Generalissimo Stalin Monday or Tuesday EYEWITNESS By RICHARD W JOHNSTON Cnited Press War Correspondent AboardI tT S Warship With Halseys 3rd Fleet Off 3 years Hokkaido has been safe from the today This was Japans far northern safety zone It was just beyond range for B29 bombing armadas from Saipan It was a little too far for northernbased bombers from the Aleutians This forested island lies with its horns perched above Honshu on the map of today Admiral William F Bull Halseys airmen let the islanders have it We came into Hokkaido just as we did into a rapidity which the Japanese did not suspect Again 1000 U S car riot1 planes flew over many targets A pilot who just came back reported there was no airborne re sistance over Hokkaido but the flak was as intense as it was in Tokyo Hokkaidos 3000000 people had seen U S planes before They were B29 Superfortresses which were high overhead on recon E They had never seen before these singieengined planes which strafed their airfields and bombed ships around the southernport of Hakodate They saw them same planes and the same airmen that were over theTokyo area only 4 days ago WAR AT A GLANCE By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS XL S 3rd fleet moved close to Japanese coast to bombard Honshu pounding enemy steel city of Kamaishj only 275 miles north of Tokyo 1000 carrier planes made first aerial strike at northern Japan i resistance collapsing as Australian troops drove near Sambodja airfield 20 miles north of captured Balikpapan warships and carrier planes attacked Nicobar islands northwest of Dutch Sumatra mines cleared from Malacca Straits between Sumatra and Singapore troops fought way into lost U S air base city oC Kanhsien 215 miles northeast of Canton World Peace Charter Takes Place on Senate Calendar to Face Most Critical Test See 8 Point Cut in Butter Later in Year Washington 8point cut in butter ration values and sharp reduction in civilian sugar sup plies during the last 3 months of the year appeared to be possibili ties Saturday The chief of OPAs dairy pro ducts branch Eugene Brocken brough disclosed Friday night that a tradeproposal to lower butter ration values to 16 points a pound is being given very careful con sideration Meanwhile agriculture depart ment officials reported that the civilian supply of sugar during the final quarter of the year may be pared 25 per cent under the July September quarter allotment SHAEF Greatest High Command Dissolves Paris greatest unified military command of supreme headquarters of the allied expeditionary force was dis solved at a m Saturday Gen Dwight D Eisenhower the supreme commander said it was his hope and prayer that the unparalleled unity which has been achieved would point the way to a permanent and lasting peace Ending 17 months and 1 day after it was launched to bring Germany to her knees in defeat SHAEF was disbanded virtually on the eve of the Big 3 Potsdam conference for interallied agree ment on the first steps of rehabili tation under the peace British newspapers paid tribute to the supreme command and Ei senhowers leadership and the army newspaper Stars and Stripes hailed it as a conclusive demon stration of the effectiveness of in ternational cooperation As SHAEF was dissolved the allied armies reverted to their own national control and Gen Eisen hower became strictly an Amer ican commander for the first time in nearly 3 years Eisenhower stepped into his new job as com mander of States Forces in the European and as American representative on the European control council at Berlin Gen Eisenhower who returned to his Frankfurt Germany head quarters from the United States on Wednesday bade farewell to the troops who had served under his command in an order of the day which said no praise is too high for the manner in which you have obstacle Under the new setup XI S headquarters at least for the time being will be at Frankfurt Under USFET will be 2 major groups or functions The communications zone and occupation and control The former is commanded by Lt Gen John C H Lee and will de vote itself to the major task ot getting men out of the European theater Occupation and control covers all American troops in Germany whether there to stay or notIt may be well toward the end of 1945 before the number of troops left in Germany is down near the size to be designated ultimately as the army of occupation SHAEF officially came into ex istence on Feb 13 1344 Its orig inal designation was chief of staff supreme allied com mand Its first headquarters were a few buildings in a residential section of London On Oct 1 SHAEF forward mov ed to Jullouville near Granville in Normandy Later Eisenhower moved his forward headquarters to Reims then to Frankfurt Red Has New Home Wins Ittinn UR Anne Nakamura an American born Japanese will be lie first of her kind to locate in Red Wing under government relocation plans GENERAL EISENHOWER CHANGES preme commander of the allied expeditionary forces Gen Dwight Eisenhower chats with Lt Gen W B Smith his chief of staff at a farewell party at Frankfurt Germany iollowing dissolution of the supreme command He drops the supreme commander title which he held for 17 months and now becomes commander of American forces in Europe Washington a 20 jDrthe foreign delations tfie united nations charter took its place on the senate calendar Sat urday for its most critical world test Without a move to dot an the 23member committee in dorsed the 50nation peacekeep ing agreement and handed it over to the senate There debate will begin on the document July 23 amid signs pointing to its over whelming approval If this approval is given without reservations or amendments as leaders confidently expect sup porters feel other nations which have been waiting for this country to act will hurry to attach their official ratifications That will bring into being a new league capable of using force to prevent aggression if it be comes necessary The committees indorsement came at the end of a half hour closed session Friday which wound up 5 days of public hear ings Three members who were absent xvill have an opportunity to get their names on the rolls later Senator Johnson H who had a dental appointment at the time of the meeting may register his vote Saturday Although he opposed American entry inlo the league of nations he has indicated he might go along this time Sen Shipstead H who has not said how he will vote and Sen Murray D a char ier supporter were out of town The charter still may face pro posed reservations in the senate Sen Bushfield R S Dak says he has 4 in mind but is having difficulty An getting them into proper legislative language Briefly he wants to deny the new organization power to order use of U S troops without ap proval of congress refuse it au thority to limit American arma ments bar the proposed world security council from interference with the Monroe doctrine and pro vide for congressional definition of the powers of American repre sentatives to the league Tractors on Highway Cause Traffic Hazard DCS nioines on highways create a special type traffic hazard Kirk Fox chair man of the farm safety section of the Iowa State Safety council declared Saturday as prepara tions were made for observance of national farm safety week July 22 to 28 Both the man on the tractor and th6 motorist must recognize the hazard and act accordingly Fox said He explained that potential danger exists because tractors move more slowly than ordinary traffic they have a broader gauge than automobiles and tractors are likely to leave the road for any l field along the way GEN CHENNAUtT TO LEAVE ARMY i 4th Air Force Chief Directed Flying Tigers Kunming China Gen Claire L Chennault is leav ing China and retiring from the U S army He made this an nouncement Saturday 2 days aft er the appointment of Lt Gen George E Stratemeyer as com mander of all U S air forces in China Chennault who is 55 has been commander of the U S lith air force and before that directed Chinas Flying Tigers against the Japanese Lt Gen Albert C Wedemeycr commander of all U S forces in the Chinese theater announced accept ance Chennaults resignation Chennault called in cor respondents to disclose his de cision He said he would no continue as commander o the 14th air force although Wedemeyer in announcing S t r a t emeyers appoint men Chennault Thursday had said that Chennault would retain his command Chennault once before retired from the U S army in 1936 be cause of disability He came to China in 1937 and started work ing for the Chiang KaiShek gov ernment He was recalled to actiw U S duty in 1942 The Japanese are now beaten in the air in China Chennaul said in a statement announced si multaneously in Calcutta Kun ming and Chungking Chennaul expressed the hope that he woulc return home as soon as the transi tion is made to Stratemeyers nev organization Women Battle Flames in Iowa Town Because Husbands Are in Army Commerce Iowa wa with a special feminine twist tha women residents of this town where most of their men folk ari in the flames anc rescued furniture from the Glen K Flynn home Mrs Flynn sounded the alarm and neighbor women helped he to carry out much of the furni ture including the kitchen stove before flames destroyed the home After it was over the women retired to the Commerce hig school and served dinner for th Flynns and their 5 children NIP HOMELAND GETS 1ST MAJOR BOMBARDMENT Powerful Surface Fleet Ranges Along Eastern Honshu in Big Strike Guam United States iavy struck its greatest blow of he war squarely into the heart if Japan Saturday Under cover a 1000 plane carrier strike on he northern islands a powerful American surface fleet ranged along eastern Honshu and sub cted the Japanese homeland to ts first major naval bombard ment in history A terse fleet announcement in licated the thundering airsea at ack might still be in progress Saturday afternoon Tokyo 0 hours after the aerial strike egan at dawn and more than 3 hours after the first naval salvo crashed inlo the Honshu port of Kamaishi at noon Fragmentary reports flashed Jack from Admiral William F lalseys mighty 3rd fleet off the Fapanese coast said there was no nittal opposition from sea or air The startled Japanese who lad been trumpeting for 4 days liat Halseys warships fled southward after blasting Tokyo ast Tuesday were caught com pletely by surprise when the American fleet rose out of the sea 275 to 450 miles north of their capital While a massive carrier task Torce raced up through the north ern fogs to loose its planes against he hiding place of the Japanese air force on northern Honshu and southern Hokkaido the surface fleet numbering at least 9 battle ships cruisers and destroyers wheeled in to bombard Kamaishi from only Sto18miles With the attacking force were some of the most powerful fight ing ships afloat including the 35000ton battleships Massachu setts Indiana and South Dakota Added to the plunging fire of their 16 inch guns were the 8 inch shells of the 13000 ton heavy cruisers Chicago and Quincy and the lighter fire of the destroyers Black Erben Heerman and Sutherland Kamaishi is an important sea port and steel mill city on the northeastern coast of Honshu 275 miles north of Tokyo with a pre ivar population of more than 42 Almost 200 miles to the north Halsey loosed his carrier planes against the fogshrouded chain oE airfields studding the northern hp at Honshu and the Hokodate sector of southern Hokkaido It was the first strike of the war on Hokkaido which the Japanese only last week considered a safe refuge for the bombedout resi dents of Tokyo and other central cities Hoaring out to the attack at the first light dawn the navy fly ers turned the Tsugaru straits be tween Honshu and Hokkaido into a biazing death trap for swarms Japanese ships and small craft They shot up railway ferries be tween the 2 islands stoked great fires in the Hokkaido port of Ho kodate a city of more than 200000 persons and slammed thousands of rockets bombs and machine gun bullets into perhaps 25 airfields in the area Hokkaidos 3000000 men wom en and children had seen only a few scouting B29s over their is land before Saturday they saw wave upon wave of Corsairs Hell cats Helldivers and Avengers screaming down on their factories and military works unchallenged by the strangelydormant Japa nese air force Some American observers be lieved the bulk of the Japanese air force now estimated at about 4000 firstline combat planes had been shifted to hideouts on north ern Honshu and Hokkaido to await the coming invasion Tokyo broadcasts admitted tho air and nava bombardment but significantly they made no men tion of early Japanese opposition They tacitly confirmed hints from the fleet that American concentrated on the HonshuHok kaido air fields to keep the Japa nese fighters down while the navy bombers worked over ship ping and other military targets Enemy accounts said the brunt of the attack fell upon Aomori bay on the Honshu coast opposite Hakodate while a smaller force bombed Senadi bay to the south But the bitterest blow to Japa nese face was the surface bom bardment on Kamaishi where American gunners were exacting a bloody vengeance for Pearl Har bor Not since the crowded junks Kubiai Khan attacked Japan in the 13th century and were scat tered by the di vine hostile surface   

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