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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: July 11, 1945 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - July 11, 1945, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME Of ANO ARCHIVES f HOiNEt I A THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH 1OWANS NEIGHBORS YOU 14 Associated Press and Cnlled Presj Full Leased Five Cents MASON CITY IOWA WEDNESDAY JULY 11 1945 This Paper Conalsto oi Two NO 139 Ml i Invasion Talk Comes From Both U S Japs YANKS BLAST FORMOSA OIL of flame flowers from the Toshien oil refinery on Formosa as 1000pound bombs dropped from 5th air force Liberators find their mark A total of 132 tons of demolition bombs were dropped on the refinery and sur rounding targets when 34 bombers attacked recently Ten bombers were hit by enemy flak all returned safely to their base AP wirephoto Japanese Abandon Salient of US Air Bases in China CHINESE RETAKE 3 MORE BASES Allied Planes Aid Advancing Forces By GEORGE WANG Chungking Chinese central news agency reported Wednesday that Japanese forces hurriedly abandoningtheir entire salient in southern Kiangsi province where they have been clinging to a number of former American airbases since last Jan uary The high commands communi que supported this viewpoint Wednesday with the report that Chinese troops stepping up their offensive against Japans China land corridor had recaptured HainCheng Sinehang airfield and Nankang both in Kiangsi province as well as Chungtu on the KweilinLiuchoiv highway 35 miles x northeast of Liucliow in central Kwangsi Central news reported allied planes were aiding Chinese ground forces by harassing the Japanese retreat Kanhsienj principal Jap anese stronghold on the Kan river has been the target of allied bombers for tne past 3 days with dumps and hundreds of junks and with Central news said that Japanese iorces in Kanhsien in southwest ern Kiangsi had already begun retreating northward and Kah sien might be reoccupied by Chi nese troops in the near future The Japanese are still holding Kahsien Suichwan and Taiho in Another Shortage of Feed for Livestock Threatens Meat Poultry Production Washington possibility of another livestock feed short age arose Wednesday to threaten government plans for expanding BIG 3 PARLEY MIGHT AFFECT WORLD FUTURE Truman Seems Calm as He Nears 1st Talk With Stalin Churchill EDITORS NOTE Following is the first dispatch from the ship bearing President Truman to the big 3 meeting Ernest B Vaccaro Associated Press white house correspondent at Washington is one of 3 reporters in the presi dential party Transmitted by naval communications the story was released by the white house By ERNEST B VACCARO Aboard Cruiser in MidAtlantic with President Truman President Truman is enroute to Europe for his first big 3 meet ing which may shape the course of world affairs for generations He is traveling in a baltle tested warship The vessel is part of a 2 cruiser task force under the command of Rear Adm Allan R McCann The presidential party which includes James F Byrnes secre tary of state and Fleet Adm Wil liam D Leahy the presidents chief of staff will fly from the area in the big C54 luxury liner in which Sir Truman traveled to the united nations conference at San Francisco Captain Jarnes H Foskett com mands theship carrying the pres ident The other cruiser is com manded by Captain Robert L Boi ler Tanned and apparently in tip top physical condition President Truman is cruising toward his first conference with Premier Sta lin and Prime Minister Churchill through midAtlantic waters as placid as those of a mill pond in his native Missouri Wearing a sporty cap cocked Deployment Timetable Wednesdays imetabie of homecoming Ameri can divisions 4th Infantry On high seas ex pected to reach the United States shortly 44th Infantry On high seas should reach port early next week 87th Infantry On high seas should arrive about a week from Wednesday 5th Infantry Two transports cleaved Le Havre Tuesday 3rd and final leaves Thursday 2nd Infantry Began loading at Le Havre Tuesday expected to clear port Thursday 13th Armored Scheduled to be gin embarking Le Havre Friday 20th Armored Moving into Le Havre staging era slated to begin Japs Mass for Stand at Borneo Mountain After Losing Harbor Oil Plants loading late nest week 28th Infantry Advance part scheduled to clear Le Havre Thursday remainder leaves Camp Pittsburgh Reims for Le Havre Monday 30th Infantry Advance units reach Le Havre Wednesday re mainder processing at Camp Okla homa City 45th Infantry Still alerted but date of shipment to Reims still indefinite 35th Infantry Alerted tenta tively scheduled arrive Reims week from Wednesday Advance parties on the 4th 44th 87th 5th 2nd and 13th armored have all States arrived in the United southern Krangsi all principal airfield towns former Central news said in retreating from Kiangsi the Japanese might move toward Hengyang along the CantdnHankow railway or high way orcheose to attempt a break through on the Kan river al the way to Nanchang on the south shore of Lake Poyang in northern Kiangsi The communique said that Jap anese troops in the area 14 miles northwest of Kahsien drove north eastward Tuesday while a 2nc column pushed northward from Kahsien engaging Chinese forces along the KahsienSuichwan high way Indications Increased in south ern Kiangsi that the Japanese are pulling northward out of the Kah sien area Kahsien and Suichwan both still in Japanese hands are 2 o the principal former American airfields in Kiangsi Tayu 50 air miles southwest of Kahsien which was recaptured a few days ago meat and poultry output in 194G In its July report on crop peels the agriculture department said that due to unfavorable weather and shortages of labor and materials this years produc tion of feed grains may be the smallest since 1941 This years production will form next years livestock feed supply And that supply will have to be arger than now indicated if more logs are to be raised and fattened f beef cattle are to be fed to heavier weights and if poultry and egg production are to be in creased Livestock production declined ast year due largely to a short eed supply and to high feed costs n relation to livestock prices The unfavorable feed grain out ook is expected to lead Secretary of Agriculture Anderson to post pone for another 30 days at least decisions on proposals to establish ireater financial incentives for ivestock production The next of icial report on crop prospects will be issued Aug 10 Those by he house food investigating com mittee which Anderson headed be fore he moved to the agriculture department July 1 An increase in the hog sup port price from S13 to per riundred pounds Chicago basis and 2 Establishment of a wider mar gin between prices of lower grade unfattened beef cattle and higher grade fattened cattle This is de jauntily on the side of his head the president seems to feel the peace of his journeymay augur well for the outcome of the ren dezvous in midJuly in Potsdam on House Votes on FEPC Thursday Washington house ap propriations committee Wednesday recommended allotment of S250 000 to liquidate the fair employ ment practice committee The committees recommenda tion will bring the controversial issue to the house floor Thursday for a vote congressional leaders hope will break a 6weeks dead lock holding up funds for 16 home front war agencies The action was by voice vote but southern members of the com mittee emphasized that it was not unanimous They said they were signed to encourage feeding lower grade cattle to heavier weights A short feed grain crop how ever would not support the ex panded hog and cattle feeding There is plenty of time how ever for the corn crop7now indi cated as likely to be the smallest in many improve Last years crop got off to a poor start but wound up at record propor tions There is little hope how ever of this years harvest coming close to that of a year ago because the acreage is down 5 per cent A short feed grain crop might well result in more meat this win ter but smaller supplies in 1946 than now hoped for This could develop by forcing heavy market ing of lean meat animals this fall and winter It might be possible to use a large amount ot wheat to supple ment short corn supplies excep that huge quantities of wheat wil pofMrd fop Furonn ACCIDENT KILLS PORTLAND BOY Robert Max Foell 15 Thrown by Tractor Hobert Max Foell 15 son of Mr and Mrs Perry Foell Port land was fatally injured when lis chest was crushed in a fall rom a tractor he was driving on he Glenn McEachran farm 1 mile outh of Portland late Tuesday afternoon The boy was pronounced dead at p m shortly after he was jrought to the hospital by Mr McEachran Mason City firemen orked on the body with a re suscitator for 15 minutes Robert who had been emplo3ed on tlie farm for a month was ound lying face down in the Mc Eachran field shortly after when Mr McEachran became alarmed after he failed to see the ractor in the field He had re turned from Portland The tractor Robert was driving was believed to have pitched him when it was backed into a 12foot sandpit righted itself near the edge of a field He was found 15 feet away from the machine The motor was not running Surviving are Roberts parents Mr and Mrs Perry McEachran and 2 brothers Wayne and Gor don both at home Funeral serv ices will be held at the Patterson funeral home at p m Friday Manila troops j Wednesday moved toward 200 foothigh Mount Batochampar where Japanese forces have massed for a determined stand after completely losing both Balik papan harbor and the Pandsansari oil refineries Gen Douglas MacArthurs spokesman said the hardy Aus tralians dealt the Japanese a dou ble blow on Sunday While one group occupied the Pandansari refinery which is the largest in the Netherlands East Indies other units landed on the Djenebora peninsula 4 miles north of Penadjam to secure com pletely Balikpapan harbor The Australians pushing across in small boats were covered by naval gunfire but met no opposi tion The headquarters spokesmen said other Australian forces which had pushed almost a mile north east of Manggar airfield had met Japanese forces in considerable strength The Australians pushing northeast from Balikpapan were reported within half a mile of the pipeline bridge on the Shoember river The pipeline 5 miles north of Balikpapan leads northward to the tiny village of Wain an the WainBeser river MacArthurs headquarters also revealed that heavy bomber and tighter units continuing the neu tralization of Formosa blasted grounded enemy planes and air drome installations at Shinchiku and attacked oilfields on the southwest coastalplains A night patrol plane harassed the enemy base at Mako in the Pescadores Reconnaissance planes RAID REPORTS INDICATE JAPS ARE IN the outskirts of conquered Berlin Primarily the meeting will concern the laying of the ground work for the peace treaty with Germany including settlement of boundary reparations occupa tional rehabilitation and other questions The president left Washington last Friday night by train sailing the next day from the army port of embarkation dock Newport News Va on the journey which may cover in excess of 10000 miles by the time he returns to the white house Mr Truman gave his approval Tuesday to a direct repBrt from shipboard on his trip Correspond ents of the 3 news services and a representative of the radio net works accompanied him In the presidential party are Brig Gen Harry H Vaughn and Captain James K Vardaman his opposed to granting any additional funds to the agency created by President Roosevelt to prevent employment discrimination be cause of race color or creed Backers of the agency likewise expressed dissatisfaction with the committees action and said they would not agree to any provision requiring liquidation of FEPC maintaining blockade of a roundtheclock the Asiatic coast bombed military targets in Amoy harbor and the Canton area and Destroyed or damaged a freighter The planes also attacked rail transport in IndoChina It was announced that HAAF Spitfires and Beaufighters are now using bases in Borneo Over 25 P38s bombed and strafed oil wells in the Shinei area of southwest Formosa while a navy bomber sank 3 small freighters in Kuching harbor on the west coast Two other bombers sweeping the IndoChina coast sank a barge and lugger and destroyed a loco motive and 12 cars A small force of 13 airforce and RAAF Liberators hit 5 airfields on Celebes while other B24s fired oil tanks and warehouses in the Bajoe area of eastern Borneo military and naval Secretary Charles aids Press G Ross H 200 Claim Damage by Wind Hail Osage A T Brookins secre tary of Farmers Mutual Fire As sociation reports that in the 4 windstorms May 20 and 24 June 28 and July 5 over 200 claims are on file for damage occasioned Freeman Matthews director of the state departments office of Eu ropean affairs Charles E Bohlcn the departments Russian expert Benjamin V Cohen of Byrnes staff and Capt Alphonse McMa hon a naval surgeon assigned to look after the health of the party The smallest staff ever to ac company a president to such a conference they will be joined in Germany by Joseph E Davies special presidential emissary and officials of the war navy and state departments The understanding is that Gen eral of the Army George C Mar shall chief of staff and Fleet Ad miral Ernest J King chief of naval operations and possibly General Henry H Arnold chief of the army air forces also will sit in on the conferences Starting with his arrival at Newport News when he left his train for the admirals cabin on the ship the president has been up andabout every day no later than 6 a m He spends several hours each day with Byrnes and other mem bers of his staff going over con ference papers and reports from the Pacific battlcfronts The chief executive Is in con stant radio communication with the white house tiy high speed transmit ers STATUS QUO OF CHARTER SURE Gonnally Believes He Can Beat Down Changes Washington Con nally DTex expressed confi dence Wednesday that supporters have sufficient senate votes to knock down any reservations to the united nations charter As the foreign relations commit tee he heads arranged to hear an abbreviated lineup of opposition witnesses Connally told reporters he is ready to face the issue of charter amendments now Weve got the votes to knock uance oi racing appeared to be virtually impossible pt at tracks where horses already are ODT Ban Hits Racing Prospects Washington office of defense transportation order Wed nesday virtually confined race horses and racing itself to tracks now operating The ODT ordered that transpor tation of race horses or show ani mals by railroad and common or contract motor carriers be pro hibited effective at 5 p cen tral war time Wednesday Under these conditions contin GENERAL LAUDS HTH AIRFORCE Has Knocked Japs Out of Sky Chennault Says Kunming 14th air force has achieved its objectiv of sweeping Japanese planes from Chinas skies Lieut Gen Clair Chennault declared in a pres conference Wednesday He said the 14ths next objec tive would be support of Chinese land armies now pushing Japa nese ground forces back on sev eral sectors Chennault said the Japanese are now shifting many airforce units from the home islands to Manchuria where the enemy has numerous excellent airbases which are operational on a mo ments notice The general declared that lie believed the Japanese had drained practically all their air strength from southeast Asia with only an occasional enemy plane mak ing a linking hop between Indo China and China providing a tar get for the Hths gunners last month He revealed that during the Okinawa battle the 14th raided Japans Shanghai bases so ef fectively that no enemy planes from that area participated in the strikes against American invasion forces Summing up 3 years of opera tions in China the general said that his airmen had destroyed over 2000 Japanese planes in the air and on the ground and they had hit over 2000000 tons of en emy shipping more than the Japs have floating now Adm Nimitz Reports Continuation of Air Strikes at Homeland Guam Fleet Adm hester W NimiLz and the Tokyo adio spoke openly future American invasion moves Wed esday as first fragmentary as essment of Tuesdays 1000plane arrier assault on Tokyo account d for only 154 enemy planes The defending enemy air force learly was reluctant Tokyo radio speculated that the American carrier strike presaged n invasion and recalled that the ast carrier force blow at Tokyo vas followed promptly by land ngs on Iwo Jiina Admiral Nimitz reported a re grouping of growing American air lower in the Ryukyus giving Gen Jouglas MacArthur command of all army planes added hat his own marineand navy air raft will continue their strang ing blockade of Japan prepara tory to further amphibious as saults Preliminary reports for the morning half of Tuesdays carrier plane assault showed that only 2 of the 154 Japanese planes de stroyed or damaged were air borne Both were reconnaissance craft snoopiar too near the mighty V S 3rd fleet circling offshore None ot the Including hebiggest type carriers and bat tleships was attacked Nimitz said With no indication of air oppo sition the heavily armed Hcllctiv ers Avengers Hellcats and Cor sairs evidently were free to spend the whole day battering Tokyos oncegreat web of 70odd airports A simultaneous strike of Iwo Jimabased Mustangs at Kobe a major port of Honshu on the In land sea found virtually no aerial I opposition there either One ene ly plane was shot down 18 nocked out on the ground The iding pilots turned to shipping nd ground targets burning an rcraft plant ravaging 2 airfields nd sinking or damaging 25 ves ls Fleet aircraft and southwest Pa fic planes hit 1G other enemy lips There was no indication Wed esday from fleet headquarters hether Vice Adm John S Mc ains powerful task force 38 was ontinuing its search for targets round Tokyo or had moved else here in its search for the last of a pans air power them down Connallys estimate was sup ported by Senator Wheeler D Mont who said in a separate in terview he did not believe any reservations would obtain a ma jority vote The committee allotted 15 min utes each Wednesday to about a dozen witnesses opposed to the 50 nation peacekeeping agreement They include Ely Culbertson bridge expert and author of a world security plan of his own Connally tried to get the oppon ents started Tuesday but none re sponded to his call to testify Say ing he had been advised they wanted to go home and study the constitution first the chairman added he thought that a laudable activity Connally said a similar number of charter proponents will be heard and the hearings closed probably this week It ought to be possible he added to get the treaty before the senate early next week stabled Thus the billiondollar sport faced its 2nd serious setback in less than a year Last December James F Byrnes then war mobilization director ordered a complete stoppage of racing effective on Jan 3 1945 This ban remained in effect un til Fred M Vinson successor to Byrnes as war mobilizer lifted it last May 9 after victory over Germany Allison GI in France Gets Croix de Guerre E1 d o n W Dieh received word from her husband Pfe Eldon W Diehl who is with the 1st army in Germany that he has been awarded the croix de guerre with palms The presen tation was made by General De Gaulle by wind and hail and pnhanri for fire Buv your War Bonds and more Stamps from yonr GlobeGazette hny Iran Bays U S Vehicles TeherSn Iranian cabi net has approved the purchase of 815 American trucks and motor cars now being used by the U S forces in Iran for a total of S800 000 The action was taken July 7 Presidents Favorite Songs Range From Opera to Popular Hollywood leaving on a USO tour Bandleader Kay Kyser asked the white house for President Trumans favorite songs with the view of playing them for troops overseas The presidents favorites as re ported by Presidential Secretary William D Hassett are Over There Pack Up Your Troubles Toreador song from Carmen sextets from Lucia and Floradora and Mendelssohns Songs With out Words Buy your War Bonds and Stamps from your GlobeGazette carrier boy Weather Report FORECAST cloudy through Thursday with scattered thun der showers extreme west por tion Wednesday night and ove most of slate Thursday Warme Wednesday and Wednesdaj night Cooler west Thursday afternoon portior Minnesota Partly cloudy Wednes day night and Thursday wit scattered thundershowers Wed nesday night and in east portio early Thursday Warmer Wed nesday night Cooler north an west portions Thursday IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Tuesday 72 Minimum Tuesday 47 At 8 a m Wednesday 61 YEAR AGO Maximum go Minimum 59 Precipitation 35 New Bonus nGIBill Loses Out Washington revised GI iill of rights with a servicemens ionus provision discarded await d final approval Wednesday of he house veterans committee It makes no major changes in he loan education and job pro of the original overall eterans benefits measure but is ntended to overcome difficulties hat have developed during the bills first year of operation Stricken out by a onesided committee vote was Chairman lankins proposal to pay every veteran with 90 or more days of lonorable service an outright bonus of This is the same amount provided in the1 GI bill or exservicemen unable to ob tain jobs The Mississippi democrat of fered the proposal to offset what ic said was an encouragement to idleness in the original bills pro vision for S20 a week jobless pay menis for one year His plan called for the S20 weekly payments to every veteran employed or un employed Rankin told reporters the com mittee action should not be con strued as a definite rebuff for ad justed compensation proposals Some committee members he said felt that action now on a bonus would be unwise and should not delay needed amendments to the GI bill The bonus proposal definitely is not dead Rankin asserted Major changes approved tenta tively by the committee are de signed to simplify procedure by which velerans may obtain gov ernmentguaranteed loans and to liberalize the vocational education section of the original legislation   

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