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Mason City Globe Gazette: Tuesday, July 3, 1945 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - July 3, 1945, Mason City, Iowa                             OF NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS VOL IJ Associated Press and United Press Full Leased Wires Five Cents a Cop MASON CITY IOWA TUESDAY JULY 3 1945 This Paper Consists ol Two Ono BORNEO DRIVE TACTICAL SUCCESS M INSIDE WASHINGTON GOP Roosevelt Detractors Overlook Trumans Control By HELEN ESSAKY Central Press Correspondent Washington The republicans have still got such a mad on against Franklin D Roosevelt that they are failing to notice what is happening to themselves meanwhile They are so intent fighting the memory of the late president they are overlooking the fact that Mr Truman is run ning everything almost every own way Even Herbert Hoover one of the last administrations sharpest enemies Is relaxing his fight against the democratic party and speaking and privately In praise of the partys leader President Harry S Truman If this rush to the Truman ban ner continues Ill not be surprised to find Governor Tom Dewey in scribing sonnets To H S T The presence of Sam Rayburn in the speakers chair of the House of Representatives gives much popular appeal to Mr Tru mans request that the present presidential succession law be amended so that the speaker suc ceed the vice president to the white house in the case of death disability or removal from office Mr Sam of Texas is one of the most delightful fellows in official Washington life There must be some people who dont like Mr Sam But Ive never met any of them Not a dramatic figure not a backslapper nor an is Mr Sam Just a sound Ameri can who knows what he Is about and can be counted on by friends and opposition to do what he has said he would do B29s Hit Oil Centers for 3rd Time in Week Guam struck at Japans dwindling oil re sources Tuesday for the 3rd time in a week blasting the Maruzen oil refinery with such precision returning airmen said We wont have to go back there Fifty precisionbombing B29s hit the oil center 35 miles from Osaka before dawn Tuesday in a quick follow up of Mondays rec ord 600plane fire raid on 4 cities while other allied air forces wrecked shipping and military in stallations from Nippon to Malaya Two B29s were lost in Mondays 600 plane raid but al but 2 crew members were rescued Black smoke which rose 10000 feet above the important Maruzen oil plant could be seen for 3D miles I love the storyof the grief of a part of the United States Army when some newly arrived WACS and Red Cross workers ap peared in the officers club in a faraway island iiu fatigue uni forms slacks and shirts anilno lipstick The girls had been busy getting settled in their new quar ters and hadnt had time to change v Next day an official notice ap peared reading something like this No women not wearing skirts will be admitted to the officers club Lipstick and powder is also regarded as desirable on our femi nine guests We have waited long enough to see a few women Now they are here we want them to look like women t Some day not too far off the in the night sky Antiaircraft fire was light and the few Japanese interceptors that took to the air just seemed to want to play said Cpl W H Power of Carrollton Ga They just sat out of range and wiggled their wings and flicked their lights Twentyfirst bomber command announced mean while that 117 square miles Japanese urban industrial area had been laid waste by B29 strikes not counting Mondays record raid Reconnaissance photographs of firebomb strikes June 29 against Moji Sasebo Shimonoseki and Nobeoka showed approximately Z square miles burned out Navy search privateers ranging from Japan to China sank or damaged 8 more enemy vessels Monday as marine Corsairsswung over the home island of Kyushu and knocked down 8 Japanese fighter planes Other Okinawa based tactical air force planes at tacked the Sakishima islands off Formosa Adm Chester W Nimitz dis closed that fleet Air Wing One had destroyed 137875 tons of Japanese shipping since it began operations in the Okinawa area and dam aged 138000 tons plus shooting down 37 enemy planes SENATE MIGHT UNITE TO RATIFY Unanimous Approval of Charter a Possibility Washington Green DR I said Tuesday there is more than a faint hope in the minds of some senators that the united nations charter will be rat ified unanimously Green is a member of the for eign relations committee which opens hearings next Monday on the historymaking pact to pre serve peace He recalled to a re porter that he worked for the league of nations 25 years ago ap pearing at senate hearings then as a private citizen There is a different atmosphere now because the people are for it he asserted Events have demonstrated that we cant live alone An Associated Press poll al ready has shown more than the necessary twothirds majority ready to vote for the charter No senator interviewed has come out against it Before a vote is taken how ever the document will be taken apart phrase by phrase and its im port fully developed in debate First witness before the for eign relations committee will be Edward R Stettinius Jr former secretary of state and Presiden Trumans choice to represent the United States in the postwar se curity machinery Stettinius and Dr Leo Pasvol Aussies Brave Flames Hold South Balikpapan Manila infantry braving rivers flaming oil and barrages from Japanese 5inth guns advanced through facesearing heat Tuesday and seized part of the vital southeast Borneo petroleum of Balikpapan BYRNES TAKES OVER NEW POST BURNING KAMIKAZE smoke a Japanese Kamikaze plane attempts to dive on a U S warship during Pacific fighting The warships antiaircraft fire set the plane afire It is framed by the ships rigging AP wirephoto Governors Hear Pleas That Little Guy Gets Fair Deal Also hitting at Japans fuel sources and tightening the strang ling blockade in the southwest Pa cific theater Philippinesbased heavy bombers have knocked out 90 per cent of the alcohol produc tion on Formosa Gen Douglas MacArthur reported Other Philippines blockade planes sank 8 Japanese coastal freighters and 3 luggers attacked the Nipponese naval base at Mako in the Pescadores blasted air domes in the Celebes and hit the eastern Java airdrome at Malang IA seaplane base in the Kangean now humiliated Germany will be j islands near Java was raided sending an ambassadorial staff to Washington Will its first repre sentation here be like its first postwar representation after its first humiliation at the end of the first World XVar I remember the German am bassador who came across the ocean on the heels of the Ver sailles treaty He was a meek inconspicuous little man and his name was Wiedefeld He had a his plain wife who made no ef fort to learn American social graces I used to see Fran Wiede feld doing her own marketing She always carried a large basket over her arm sniffed the meat to see tf it was fresh and kept a keen eye on the butcher scales Looking back onthe Wiede felds I realize that they were a clever choice the German For eign Office They were so unin teresting so typically middle class that you almost felt sorry for them You found yourself say ing These dull simple souls must be good Maybe they are the real Germany Surely the war wasnt their fault It was the work of the evil German military After the Wiedefelds when the hatred against Germany was dy ing a little more vivid person alities represented the Vaterland on the Potomac A baron and a count with exotic wives A gentle old was Dr Lu ther And finally in the years before the war the handsomest roost skillful group of diplomats any Washington embassy or lega tion had But the handsome skillful group overdid their ijob here Most of them are probably fin ished off in the war I wonder what type of diplomat the new German government if ever there is a new German govern ment will consider useful in Washington Probably some pov ertystricken looking old gentle men in bifocal glasses and frayed black alpaca plus a wife who is deaf and dumb GOOD OLD DAYS Miller Mo fP Automobiles are scarce items yet the people Miller were more than a little sur prised when a local hardware store advertised a complete line of horsedrawn kind Ben Mahoney has purchased num ber first buggy sold here in a quarter century RUBBER PLANTS STRIKEBOUND Akrons Production at Virtual Standstill By UNITED PRESS Akron Ohio headquarters of the nations rubber industry was the core of strike trouble Tues day There more than half the countrys 50000 idle workers were away from their jobs at the Firestone and Goodyear tire and rubber companies Despite threats of loss of draft deferments and cherished union contract provisions approximately 33000 CIO united rubber workers remained on strike With 2 major companies strike bound and 2 and General Tire and for repairs Akrons rubber pro duction was at a virtual standstill for the first time in 75 years In another rubber production dispute the war labor board stepped into a work stoppage of 1100 workers at the Ohio Rubber company Willoughby Ohio Other strikes were scattered over the eastern half of the coon try At Allentown Pa some 3000 Mack Manufaciurinsr company employes idled for the 4th day Monday in support of 4900 strik ing employes at the companys plainfield and New Brunswick N J plants Representatives of 1700 AFL machinists conferred with WLB army and navy officials in an ef fort to resume production at the Waufcesha Motors company Wau kesha Wis while other striking machinists curtailed operations at the Cameron Iron Works in Hous ton Texas Newshungry New Yorkers lined up for their newspapers again Tuesday as members of the independent newspaper delivery mans union continued a strike over proposed contract provisions sky state department expert on the organizationplan as it grew from Dumbarton Oaks to San Francisco will be asked to spell out the full meaning of every fac tor in the charter Green said such testimony by these 2 should be enough to es tablish a prima facie case and the group then could hear any opposition views assuming there are any To expedite the hearings Chair man Connally DTexas asked that interested organizations send written statements rather than depend entirely on oral testimony The leadership hopes to report the charter to tjje senate floor by July 23 and Senator BarkJey D Ky envisages ratification by Aug 15 This would meet with Mr Tru mans appeal for prompt ratifi cation laid before the senate along with the official copy of the charter Monday afternoon Iowa War Deaths Down From May Total Des Moines IP The war claimed the lives of 321 lowans in June a drop of 163 from May Mrs BessieWilson director of the states war records division re ported Tuesday The June deaths brought to 6563 the number of lowans killed in this war The most deaths registered in one month were 543 last March YANKS ENTER BERLIN Berlin veteran 2nd armored Hell on Wheels division of the American army deployed in suburbs and the first American soldier entered theRussianheld center of Berlin Tuesday A redskinned hero of the U S army jeeped down Unter den Lin den and women wept with joy at the sight of the American Pfc Harvey Natchees of the Ute Indian reservation who wears a silver star bronze star and purple heart with oak leaf cluster was the first American soldier to enter the center of the capital The main force of the division was deployed in suburban Zhiendort to the south Exchange Telegraph in a dispatch to London said the British occupation force of about 15000 was expected to arrive in the main part of the city Tuesday night the dispatch said while the main British force would arrive Wednesday After rounding a shellscarred victory monument in the Tier garten taking a smart salute from a red army woman traffic cop and starting for the remains of the kaisers palace a lot happened to Natchees in a few minutes A Berliner on a bicycle asked the American from Utah to look up his brother Pvt William Schwellbeck somewhere American forces in France Registering the distance on his speedometer Natchees went 8 miles through Berlin without seeing one block of buildings that was intact It took quite a beating he commented He saw girls in freshly ironed frocks working in chain lines re moving bricks from mammoth piles of wreckage He saw women and children and old men queued up by the hundreds in front of bread stores He noted a red flag on a pole outside headquarters of the German communist party The eastwest axis boulevard through the blasted Tiergarten was still decorated with colossal portraits of Stalin Roosevelt and Church ill which had been raised for the previous red army celebration Scattered over the city were posters stuck up by the Russians telling Germans of the unity the united nations MAX BRACN DIES London IP Mas Braun 52 German socialist who fled for his life after losing a fight against the nazi plebiscite in the Saar basin in 1933 died Tuesday Even Break for farmers Also Urged Mackinac Island Mich The nations governors heard pro posals Tuesday that small busi ness be given a head start in re conversion and farmers an even break with industry instead of federal handouts Gov tester C Hunt of Wyo ming declared in an address pre pared for delivery at the 2nd days session of the 37th confer ence of the states chief execu tives that unless little business gets the jump on large industry in the changeover to peaceful pur suits its chances of survival will be seriously threatened On the same program Gov Chauncey Sparks Alabama told his colleagues federal measures to aid the farmers had been poor sedatives that ought to give way to efforts to making food production more efficient increasing markets and perfect ing distribution The governors turned to do mestic problems after hearing Commander Harold E Stassen former Minnesota governor call Monday night for a reorienta tion of American foreign policy under which this country would assume the role of mediator be tween the clashing interests of other nations Discussing the future of avia tion Governor Dwight H Green of Illinois urged full and cor dial partnership among federal state and local governments in developing an adequate airport system Gov E P Carville of Nevada called for stock piling of the na tions raw materials as a method of conservation and a contribu tion to the future security of our economic structure As a means helping small business in the critical reconver sion period Governor Hunt pro posed tViat the governments dol larayear men be selected from thin classification No Change in Basic Policy He Declares Washington F Byrnes was sworn in as secretary of state Tuesday President Truman and the high est officials of the government looked on as the oath was ad ministered to the man who would succeed to the presidency under present statutes should Mr Tru man be unable to complete his term After Byrnes was sworn by Chief Justice Richard S Whaley of the court of claims in a brief cere mony on a white house terrace he said I enter upon my duties as sec retary of state deeply conscious of the great and grave responsibilities of that office A change in the secretaryship of state at this time involves no change in the basic principles of our foreign policy In a formal statement the new secretary said In advising President Truman on foreign policy I shall seek the constant help and guidance of the senate committee on foreign rela tions and the house committee on foreign affairs My friend Cordell Hull with whom I have served in the con gress and in the executive branch of the government and who has done so much to shape our foreign policy during the critical war years has promised to give me the benefit of his wise counsel Byrnes told his audience he has asked everyone in the department to remain at their posts and to carry on as usual As the new secretary took the oath Edward R Stettinius Jr the man he succeeds stood one step behind him I am glad also that I will be in a position to advise with my im mediate predecessor Mr Stettin ius particularly on the tremend ously important tasks relating to the organization of the united na tions as a permanent institution to maintain peace the Byrnes state ment added Press Secretary Charles CRoss announced that Stettinius will have an office in the white house to carry on his new duties as mejn ber of the united nations security council DEWEY AT MACKINAC FOR Thomas E Dewey of New York and his mother rest at the Grand hotel on Mackinae island Mich after Deweys arrival to attend the 37th governors conference Seated with them in the front row at the left is Gov R Gregg Cherry of North Carolina Standing are left to right Governors Charles M Dale of New Hampshire and J Howard McGrath of Rhode Island Weather Report FORECAST Mason City Partly cloudy am warmer Tuesday night anc Wednesday Iowa Fair and warmer Tuesday through Wednesday Minnesota Partly cloudy Tuesday night and Wednesday wit scattered light showers nort portion Warmer east por tion Tuesday Continued mill Wednesday IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette Weather statistics Maximum Monday 73 Minimum Monday 53 At 8 a m Tuesday 62 YEAR AGO Maximum 78 Minimum 61 Precipitation 10 ANDERSON ASKS LOCAL HELP CoOperation Required to Beat Meat Shortage Washington of Agriculture Anderson said Tues ay easing of slaughtering regula ons will depend upon coopera ion of local authorities in dealing vith black markets An amendment to the recently Traded OPA extension bill gives he new cabinet officer authority o certify nonfederally inspected lacking plants as sanitary thus lermittmg them to ship their neat across state lines and to sell to the armed forces Sponsored by Representative Patman Jie provision was designed to make more meat available in shortage areas Anderson however told news men after his first full workday in his new post that If we were a issue blanket authority under he Patman amendment to the nonfederaiiy inspected slaughter ers it might harm a good deal of the good done under present OPA restrictions Local officials he added must assume some responsibility to see that the meat reaches the legi timate market at legal ceilings Australian radio reports assert ed they also had captured both the Sepinggang and Manggar air fields 3 and 10 miles northeast of Balikpapan and the Australian commander declared the 2 day old invasion already was a stra tegic success Volcanoes of fire and dense black smoke from the blazing heart of the refinery area rolled over Aussieheld ridges that dom inate both the town and the beach Standing atop the highest of these ridges Lt Gen Sir Leslie J Morshcad Australian corps commander declared that quick capture of this commanding ground had insured success of the campaign In a strategic sense he ex plained the campaign is won although Japanese resistance in land was stiffening and the en emys concealed artillery still was spattering ridges and beachhead Tokyo radio said approximately 7000 allied troops had been put ashore by Monday night spear headed by 2 heavy tanks and 50 medium anks The Japanese placed air support of this ground operation at 170 planes and noted an increase of warships includ ng 5 cruisers 50 transports and other types Gen Douglas MacArthurs com munique Tuesday located the in vading Australian 7th veterans of early New Guinea fighting and of the Syrian deserts 2 miles inland and spread for 3 miles along the sea shore MaeArthur did not confirm cap ture of the airfields but Associ ated Press Correspondent Russell Brines earlier reported from the front that capture of Sepinggang at least was imminent The Melbourne radio saifl air force crews began immediately to repair the bombcratered strips Brines said the Aussies were within 1500 yards of the heart of Balikpapan Carrier planes meanwhile aug mented continual allied long range bomber attacks against deeply entrenched Japanese posi tions and guns the U S 7th fleet joined field artillery in ham mering steadily at enemy gun emplacements Several Japanese 5inch guns concealed in hills several miles inland which began shelling the beachhead area Tues day were believed destroyed The Australians already held more than half of smashed Klan dnsan a main residential suburb of Balikpapan sprawling along lills near the Balikpapan bay en trance East of the beachhead and about a mile inland Japanese holding strong cave and tunnel positions were fighting bitterly Similar caves were encountered occasion ally inland from the main beach head and were being reduced one by one in familiar grim Pacific war fashion Aussie casualties thus far were reported light Brines radioed from the front although the Japa Buy your War Bonds and Stamps from GIobcGazcttc carrier boy nese artillery still was firing now and then into the beachhead area Only a few Japanese prisoners have been taken Brines reported In their swift advance eastward toward the airfields the Austral ians took one dominating hill with were surprised to find virtually unmanned elaborate fortifications on its crest Field commanders termed it another ex ample of the effectiveness of pre invasion air and naval bombard ments which drove Japanese de fenders from the beaches Although pockets of Japanese were standing firm American navy pilots reported sighting a convoy of enemy trucks fleeing northward along an inland road Strafing stopped 15 of the ve hicles Emphasizing the difficulty of immediate sal the refinery area As sociated Press Correspondent James Hutchcson described a lit eral river of fire separating Aus tralian and Japanese lines when a huge oil tank exploded sending a wild column of flame roaring down ravines toward the sea A No editions of the Globe Gozette will be printed on Wednesday 4th of July This will be your East issue until Thursday For pur poses of preserving the con tinuity of the comic strips the regular Wednesday in stallments are being pre sented in this paper Wrong Guy Besides Tacoma Wash ff When John Wilkes motherinlaw heard someone walking inside the Wilke house at 4 a m she called Whos there Its me a voice replied The motherinlaw went back to sleep thinking the voice was that of Johns sailor brother who was expected to come home late But next morning John found his car missing also his 16A gas stamps and in cash   

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