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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: June 20, 1945 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - June 20, 1945, Mason City, Iowa                             OF NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS HOME EDITION MASON CITY IOWA WEDNESDAY JUNE 30 1945 INSIDE WASHINGTON How About U S Toxing Temporary Visitors Too By HELEN ESSARY Central Press Correspondent dont care if this is the coolest summer in the greater capital area since the days of Big Chief Potomak Im aboutto get in a state about a wrong that must be righted I got the idea of being very mac about this grave injustice when I heard President Truman say the salaries of government officials should he raised so that it woult not necessary for them to have any interest except in working for the government of the States This I regard as a perfect idea The president made it a generally inclusiveone too He took in the low wage scale of diplomats think he would have got around to the need of raising army and navy salaries in another crisp Harry S Trumanesque sentence if one the correspondents at the confer ence had not cried Thank you Mr President This phrase at a present day news conference a the white house means Enough Weve got all the news the presses will carry As I said before the idea of raising the salaries of Umtec States officials is indeed superb But I thought where will the ex tra money come from to pay these raises We surely are a rich peo ple Foreign dignitaries say our government is the richest on earth and act accordingly while cheer fullyresigning themselves to the role of beneficiary A few minutes before I went to the white house conference 1 wrote checks for the second in stallment of mf federal income tax Plus my whole district tax likewise that personal property tax I believe everybody ought tphave more money but I dont want tohave a penny less Why cant we do a little fair taxing of foreigners in our midst I thought then If we have to have more revenue why doesnt some bodyintroduce a bill in congress taxing some of these aliens who help clutter up many New York shops and hotels and other equally attractive spaces in other cities I asked this question of several astute members of the press with whom I was loping of ficeward from 1600 Pennsylvania avenue Somebodyhas introduced just such a bill I was told conde scendingly Congressman James Geclan of Connecticut first intro duced it in the house Senator Bnen McMahon also of Connec ticut is working on the same bill m the sewnie Chairman Doughton of the house ways and means committee is planning to call a special hearing within the fort night for the purpose of investi gating the astounding sums of money being made in this country by certain temporary visitors A temporary visitor I learned with the help of some most agreeable secretaries at the state department the treasury de partment and the bureau of im migration is a person who has come to this country for a short He has not entered under the quota Of the 48689 tem porary visitors admitted during the year ending Jnne 30 many were war refugees to whom we were glad to give a haven Hitlers Chauffeur Insists Fuehrer Eva Braun Killed Selves Before Berlin Fell By JACK FLEISCHER Berchtesgaden Hit ler and Eva Braun shot and killed themselves in an underground HUCLgLULIIlQ bunker behind the Berlin reichs chancellery on April 30 a man who said he saw their gasoline soaked burning bodies reported Wednesday Marshall Sir Bernard L Mont gomerys 21st army group head quarters reported that the bodies of Hitler and Eva Braun were seen burning outside a reichs chancellery bunker on May 2 ac cording to German police eyewit nesses Hitler and Eva who long had been his mistress were married 2 days before they committed sui cide as nazidom was crashing about them in the midst of the Russian siege of Berlin the wit ness said Hitlers personal chauffeur Eric Kempke gave the first eyewitness account bearing out nazi reports that Hitler died in Berlin shortly before it fell to the red army Kempke said he carried Eva Brauns body from the bunker a little before 3 p m after she and Hitler shot themselves with pis tols Propaganda Minister Joseph osep Goebbels and his wife killed them selves in an unknown manner in a bunker on the night of May l the day before Berlin Kemp ke said The bunker was saturated with gasoline and set on fire after the suicide of Goebbels and his wife the chauffeur reported Kempke said that between 3 and 4 a m on May 2 he saw 3 other topflight nazis wounded probably fatally while trying to flee Berlin They were Martin Bormann nazi party leader Wernernau mann state secretary in the prop aganda ministry who married timer and Eva and Dr Stump fecker Hitlers personal physician m the last days of nazi resistance Leopolds Refusal to uive Up Throne Fans AntiRoyalist Flames Brussels IP King Leopolds refusal of demands that he ab dicate and his announced deci sion to return to Belgium as soon as a new cabinet is formed fanned fresh opposition among anti royalists Wednesday While the country maintained an appearance of quiet observers attached significance to the fact hat a presentation of colors the RAF by the city of Brussels was cancelled because of the po itical situation Meanwhile a 3rd emissary ar rived from Salzberg where Leo pold is awaiting the opportunity o return to his country 16 help n negotiations on the kings be GEN GEIGER Washington UR The senate nas confirmed the rank of lieuten nt general for Roy S Geiger ma me corps officer who assumed command of the I0th army on Okinawa after the death of Lt en Simon Bolivar Buckner WEST POINT Returns to Scene bt 1st Military Success West Point N Y of the Army Dwight D Eisenhow er weary but happy after a tu multuous 12hour welcoming whirl in New York City returned to the scene of his first military endeavors Wednesday 30 years aSo this month that Eisenhower was rad uated from the United States military academy He was just a boy from Kansas who wanted a career in the army He was 61st m a class of 164 cadets He re turns one of the first 5star gen erals in the nations history Eisenhowers party made the trip from New York by automo bile driving up the New York side of the Hudson river to Bear Mountain bridge A motorcycle escort met the motorcade at Bear mountain traffic circle A 17gun salute awaited him at the west gate of the academy The day was fully scheduled but was likea day of relaxation after the hectic welcome given him Tues day by New Yorks millions After a review of 3rd class of the cadet only cadets at the was scheduled to address the 800 ca The Bem0 field uniforms at 5 Iunch in tnc cadets arrived Ga from Fort y night in Sports Bulletin Ann Casey of Mason City won her quarterfinal match in the Womens Western Open golf tour ney at Indianapolis Wednesday afternoon beatins Sally Sessions A and 1 Mrs Babe Didrickson Zaharias champion took the 2flth hole to top Jean Hopkins of Cleve land 1 up The comedalist Louise lost to Dorothy Germain b and o This Paper ot Two SecUontScctloo OM MO 2U BOMB JAPAN SUICIDE ON OKINAWA LEAP TO DEATH FROM CLIFFS Many Others Surrender as U S Tanks Men Reach Southern Shore Guam numbers of Japanese leaped to their death from the cliffs of southern Oki nawa Wednesday and more and more were surrendering as U S tanks and troops broke through to the south shore Two marine regiments seized 700 yards of the south coast as they fanned out An artillery spotter plane pilot said he saw many Japanese or civilians leap ing into the sea in the first mass suicides since the Saipan cam paign Other Nipponese troops in in creasing numbers were slipping in among the thousands of civilians streaming through the American lines and were surrendering Many of the few thousand still fighting were wounded Some of the most stubborn op position was met before Mabuni near the islands southeastern coast where the enemys com manding general was believed at bay with his staff determined to stand and die A Tokyo radio broadcast con ceded the loss of Okinawa and declared its fall would have seri ous military consequences The enemy claimed furious hand to hand fighting still was Inwor ress however Well back of the marine spear head on the south coast one pocket of the enemy fought on in a death trap east of Kunishi western delaying the advance in the cen ter Lt Gen Roy S Geiger com mander of the U S tenth army whose promotion from the rank of major general was announced Tuesday was pressing for a quick decision Tanks spilled out over the pla teaus leading down to the sea helping the foot soldiers clean out enemyinfested caves Scores of Japanese troops jumped from cliffs into the suri as the eighth regimental combat team and the fifth regiment raced to the southern shores Tuesday and cut Japanese survivors into 3 pockets Both regiments were on the coast south of Komesu near the center of the islands southern tip With the enemy breaking in dis organized confusion in the marine sector of southern Okinawa and 500 Japanese surrendering in one day Adm Chester W Nimitz said in Wednesdays communique The enemys defenses were in the process of collapsing by nightfall Tuesday The southern end of the island was a nightmare of confusion In some sectors Japanese fled fran Ltcally across open terrain Air craft strafed and heavy warships shelled them Nipponese made death stands usually in small groups aking a heavy toll of American ives until wiped out by tanks lame throwers or small arms fire They killed many Ameri cans including some high rank ng officers JACKSON REACHES LONDON London UR Supreme Court Justice Robert H Jackson chief American prosecutor of war criminals arrived in London for conferences with TRAPPED JAPS Conference Hail Rain Damage historic united next Saturday Hurries to End Saturday San Francisco leaders are striving to resolve the last of the issues between the great and small powers Wednes day so that President Truman can keep his date to close this nations meetinf With the president already on the west coast at Olympia Wash and withtime growing short to prepare for the projected big meeting at Berlin next month American delegates especially were hopeful that it would not be necessary to delay the closing ses sion until early next week But much depends on the re maining the extent of discussion to be allowed a united nations general assembly It was supposed to have been settled Tuesday and officials said there seemed no question the timetable would be thrown off if it was not settled finally Wednesday Hussia is asking a stricter lim itation of assembly debates than Australia as leader of a group of small nations considers accept able Several efforts at a com promise have failed to produce agreement Other conference work is speed ing toward conclusion Princi ples for the projected security league of the world organization were voted Tuesday night by a conference commission This commission also agreed unani mously in a separate declaration that the Franco government of Spain because of axis support in coming to power should never beadmittedtccmenvbership The United Stata which like many of the other flations main tains diplomatic relations with Generalissimo Francisco Franco supported the declaration after il was advanced by Mexico and strongly backed by France REAR ADMIRAL DIES IN PACIFIC Was Director of Recent Landings on Borneo Washington Admiral Forrest Betton Royal commander ofthe recent amphibious operation in Brunei Bay off the northwest coast of Borneo died June 18 of natural causes the navy an nounced Wednesday Royal was 52 years old The Borneo landings which he directed occurred on June 10 and 11 Royal visited the battle area on June 11 with Gen Douglas Mac Arthur commander of army forces in the Pacific Announcement of Royals death was made by Secretary of Navy Jsmes V Forrestal Other than the fact that death came from natural causes no details were available Roy is the second high ranking leader to die this week Lt Gen Simon Bolivar Buckner Jr 10th army commander was killed in action the same day on Okinawa Royal was a native of New York CLEVER CANINES Anchorage Alaska Police Chief Pete Kalamarides asked Dog Catcher Monty Clinton why he wasnt catching many Clinton replied You know chief those dogs were getting awfully smart When Id go after them heyd run just beyond the city imits and you know I havent any authority there A hard hail and rainstorm ac companied by electrical disturb ance and some wind passed over Lincoln Mills and Wheelerwood area at 7 p m Tuesday The storm covered a path a mile wide on which the hailstones were so large that some of them were still on the ground until late hour Wednesday morning Crops and gardens in the path of the hail were badly damaged The river was out of its banks and fields in the area were cov ered with water causing undeter mined damage All fields were badly washed by rain which was described by residents of the area as of cloudburst proportions Trees were stripped of leaves in the vicinity of Wheelerwood Farmers could give no estimate of what the damage might be until the water leaves the fields No damage was reported in Mason City the storm having struck heaviest north of the city At the American Crystal Sugar factory 151 inches of rain was reported and hail was an inch deep on the ground In Mason City however the hail was light Gardens were washed but little damage was reported by farmers near Mason City Some of the hail stones that fell north of Mason City were an inch in diameter Some were round and some fiat according to per sons who saw them The Mason City water depart ment police and fire departments reported no calls during Tuesday nights storm The Winnebago river and Willowcreek through Mason City had notyet reached a flood state 3 Senators Present New Labor Bill Washington sen ators planned to introduce a com prehensive new labor relations act Wednesday designed to smooth postwar relations between man agement and labor and prevent damaging strikes during the re conversion period The measure would set up a new federal mediation board ban strikes in public utilities such as coal and require democratic prac tices m unions holding closed shop contracts Its sponsors Sens Carl A Hatch D N Mex Joseph H Ball R Minn and Harold H Burton R Ohio told reporters the bill represented more than 18 months of study by a 13 man group of labor relations experts headed byDonald R Richberg former head of the NBA The senators said it was the re sult of compromise and discussion between themselves and the 13 man group Hatch said they were totally committed to the bill They explained they had been careful not to discuss it with par tisan representatives of either management or labor because we wanted to approach it entirely rom the standpoint of the public ntercst Hatch in a speech prepared for delivery with the bill said if the TJ S is to fulfill its world obli jations and prevent a devastat ng depression workers and man agement must use every reason able effort to settle their differ ences by negotiation In a word we propose that the ast surviving field in which civil varfare is tolerated shall be ransformed into a field of indus rial peace Hatch said Tokyo Sees New Strike at Borneo Manila Tokyo re ported Wednesday that allied mine sweepers have begun work m the Bay of Balikpapan the great Borneo oil center which has been pounded from sea and air for the past week The Japanese broadcast said that 4 mine sweepers besan their work Tuesday a necessary pre liminary to any Invasion of the rich oil area on Borneos east coast Tokyo claimed that shove bat teries sank one of the sweepers and the other 3 withdrew Previous Japanese broadcasts have reported the bombardment of Balikpapan by an allied fleet said to include an aircraft car rier 3 battleships 16 destroyers and other warships Communiques from Gen Doug las MacArthurs headquarters have not confirmed the naval bombardments but have reported daily air attacks on gun positions and airfields in the Balikpapan a proinvasion pattern of assault Wednesdays ported that dumped 200 tons of explosives on Balikpapan and the shipbuilding center of Samarinda to the north On Borneos northwestcoast the Australians made more prog ress in all directions their ad vances apparently slowed only by the thick jungle country The force which landed at Weston on the enat shore of Brunei Bay gained 2 ot the 18 miles to the rubber center of Beaufort Advice to the Lovelorn And the Anything But Washington follow ing came in the mail from the public relations office of the army air force unit at Langiey Field a A private stationed at this AAF training command radar school ambled into the personal affairs office and reported to WAC 1st Lt Jane Durning Maam said the GI I just 0t married What do I do now The lieutenant told him communique re heavy bombers Weather Report FORECAST Mason City Considerable cloudi ness Wednesday night and Thursday Warmer Thursday Iowa Partly cloudy through Thursday Scattered thunder showers in southeast and south west Wednesday night and Thursday morning Cooler in south and west Wednesday and a little warmer Thursday Minnesota Fair continued cool Thursday partly cloudy warm er except near Lake Superior IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Tuesday 72 Minimum Tuesday 52 At 8 a m Wednesday 56 Precipitation 28 inch YEAR AGO Maximum Minimum WINDS SPREAD FLAMES IN 3 SMALL CITIES 3000 Tons of Bombs Fall on Secondary Industrial Targets Guam ff Superfortresses dumped 3000 tons of fire bombs on 3 Japanese industrial cities Wednesday setting windfanned blazes which pilots said were vis ible 5 miles away and wiped from the map as a war target the mu nitions center of Shizuoka 85 miles southwest of Tokyo The 450 Superfortresses car rying out their 25th bif Incendiary strike treated these secondary in dustrial cities to the same ordeal by fire that has erased most of the factories in Japans greater The Tokyo radio admitted fires raged out of control for five hours in Toyohashi also on the main island of Honshu Fukuoka on the southernmost island Kyushu and third target of the day was turned into a pre dawn bonfire pilots reported The largest ot the three cities Fukuoka has a population of 323000 Toyo 10 3 All 3 were raided before but V ednesdays strike was their first in the great fire raid campaign to wipe out Japans warmaking cen Radio Tokyo said GO other B28s continuing the aerial blockade of home waters laid mines off the west coast of Honshu and in the Kanmon strait between Honshu and Kyushu from Mondays big raid still hcked at Omuta also on Kyushu when the bomber forma tion struck Wednesday Lt William TV Potter Knox ville Tenn described the pattern in Fukuoka thus A path of flame 2 miles wide ran from the dock area where several ships were burning back inland for 10 miles Over the cen tral target areas smoke rose 10 000 feet in a column 2 miles In diameter B29 flyers who were trans errod recently from India to the Marianas said the turbulence of thermal updrafts was the greatest they ever had encountered The intense heat knocked us up 2000 feet knocked off my flak helmet and scrambled all loose stuff m the plane said 2nd Lt age C Talamo Hamburg N Y Flak and fighter opposition were reported ineffective over all 3 tar gets there rial Deace Hatrh Maximum 68 peace Hatch saidMinimum 47 Strike Wave Threatens War Production By UNITED PRESS The army began operation ot the strikebound Diamond Alkali com pany plarit at Painesville Ohio as a nationwide wave of strikes cur tailed war production President Truman ordered seiz ure of the alhali plant after Un dersecretary of War Robert P Patterson described the strike of 2000 workers as one of the most critical from a war standpoint The workers members of the United Mine Workers of America struck in protest against the com pany s use of outside contractors for work in the plant Additional thousands of soldiers n full battle regalia moved into Chicago Wednesday to operate trucks made idle by the walkout of 10000 operators demanding more money The army already had 1500 soldiers driving trucks there At the same time the war labor board ordered 5500 strikers at the McCormick works of the Interna tional Harvester company Chi cago back to work Wednesday The strike had halted production of farm equipment and war goods A WLB backtowork order to 18000 Goodyear Tire A Rubber Co Akron strikers was Ignored Leaders of the United Rubber Workers CIO disclaimed any re sponsibility in the strike and strikers gave no clear cause for the walkout In a separate strike move 16 workers at Akron Firestone 000 Tire and Hubber company voted in favor of a strike Leaders said the vote had no connection with the Goodyear strike Six hundred workers at the To ledo Akclin Stamping company and Mather Spring members of the United Automobile Workers a strike begun June 7 A strike of 2600 United Steel Workers CIO over the discharge of one worker went into its eighth day at the American Roll ins Mill company plant Ashland Ky despite a WLB back to work order Leaders of American Federation of Labor unions in Chicago said they did not believe workers at the R R Donnelley Sons com pany printing plant would heed a WLB directive to halt a work stoppage which began two weeks ago The strike for a time threat ened printing of Time and Life magazines The WLB urged members of pressmen bookbinders and paper cutters press assistants typo graphers mailers photo engrav ers paper handlers and binding helpers unions and the company to try private arbitration in a dis pute over the closed shop Representatives of the Transport Workers tmlon CIO in New York announced the end of a bos slow ojown which affected 90 per cent of the citys buses Production at a Sacramento Cal cannery was reported only 40 per cent of normal following a junsdictional dispute between the seafarers and teamsters unions both AFL glass workers at s orers at the Northwestern Glass company Seattle struck for higher wages Loggers in the northwest area threatened to strike unless the WLB approved wage increases The AFL machinists union said it will petition the WLB Thursday for a strike vote among 10000 workers at the El SegunHo Cal Douglas Aircraft plant They cem plaincd there was downgrading lower pay for women and that new workers were hired at less pay than they had been receiving at other plants CHINESE NEAR AIR FIELD Only 6 Miles From Liu chow City Chungking forces lave smashed within 3 miles of the Liuchow air base and 6 miles of the city itself a Chinese com munique reported Wednesday Other Chinese troops now Vrere ighting in the southern and west ern suburbs of Liuchow the com munique said The Chinese captured a point on he highway to Liuchow a miles outhwest of the city There they vere within 3 miles of the air ase used by American air forces n China until the city was taken the Japanese last year The communique also revealed he opening of 2 Japanese coun erdnves on the Liuchow penin ula One enemy column struck northward from Linkong and the 2nd drove on Shokok 20 miles north ot Lingkong The Liuchow cmnsula juts Into the China sea 200 miles south of Liuchow Earlier the Central News agen cy reported that 1 Chinese column had reached Laiming 12 miles outh of Liuchow and another was 14 miles from the city TOO PRACTICAL Hariingen Tex nonths ago Forest Dugat Har ingen butcher ordered a new meat saw This week it was deliv ered Wednesday Dugat was trying o borrow a side of beef to prac ice on Buy your War Bonds ann Stamps from your GIobeGaClr carrier boy   

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