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Mason City Globe Gazette: Tuesday, June 19, 1945 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - June 19, 1945, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME cou OF HISTOHV AMD AUCHlves DCS UOINCS THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS HOME EDITION VOL LI Associated Press and United Pros roll Leased Wire Five Cents Copy MASON CUT IOWA TUESDAY JUNE 19 tbit Piper Consists of TWO NO 217 Army Lashes Out in Revenge for Leaders Death VICTORY IMMINENT ON OKINAWA INSIDE WASHINGTON Women Make No Progress As Corgressional Members By Central Press Capital Staff Rep Emily Taft Douglas D of Illinois predicts it will be a long time before a woman would be wise to run for president The number of women voted Into office in the last election de creased Mrs Douglas pointed out women did 60 per cent of the voting There is one more woman in congress this year But Mrs Doug las said that only puts the num ber back to what it was 15 years ago Few women she declares are entering national politics One reason is that this career is hard to combine with being a wife and mother she explains If a man is elected to congress his wife moves to Washington But the husbands business makes It im possible for him to trail along If his wife is elected Further she says women are not willing gamblers A political career does not offer the security the average woman wants MIDWESTERN neighborliness fairly radiated from the white house when President Truman in vited 1936 and 1944 republican candidates Alfred E Landon and Thomas EDewey to visit the presidential mansion Prefacing the conference be tween president Truman and for mer President Herbert Hoover on the world food problem White v House Secretary Charles Ross made public the chief executives invitation to the 2 republican nominees to drop in to talE at any time they careto CTTPID APPEARED in a slump as thevcbmrherce depart ment reported 8 per cent less marrirjes forApril than in the same month of 1944 Only 39725 marriage licenses were issued in April compared with 43032 the year before 45783 in April 1943 Reflecting Cupids current de featist attitude the department report added morosely that ob viously not all licenses will re sult in marriages ITS A LITTLE BIT too early to talk about Christmas but not for manufacturers who already are thinking about Santa Claus next visit In Washington moves have go under way to make Christinas 1945 somewhat brighter than those of other war years WPB has removed restriction on making new tree light sets and this is expected to remove a short age of bulbs which has existed for the past several years It is probable that new electri trains will be available for WPB plans to help the toy train indus try to get scarce metals to resume limited output of the the first time since 1942 Some bicycles may be available as WPB has removed manufac turing restrictions provided the producers can get materials But do not look for tricycles for smaller children The WPBs toy division says that wheel goods manufacturers are still tied up in war work and will continue to be until 1946 FOR A point system of discharges for the marine corps in the next 90 days Plans are only being formulated but some sys tern is to be worked out The reason behind it is that al though the war in which they have best shown their abilities Is still on there arent so many places left for them to go They have borne the brunt of amphibious landings in the Pa cific The marines are trained his torically to go ashore delivering smash hits to establish a beach head They are not equipped to move far inland and dont have the supply equipment to conduct in land operations So there are few places left for them to go only the Asiatic mainland or the home islands of Japan Polish Underground Leader Says Organizations Main Task Was to Fight Russia London Moscow said a member of the Polish under ground testified at the terrorist trial Tuesday that the main task of the organization was to prepare to fight Russia The witness identified only asf Zelinski former underground commandant in the Wilmo area was called to the stand as the arial of 16 Polish leaders on charges of terrorist attacks on the red army entered its 2nd day in Moscow Fifteen of the 16 defendants al ready have pleaded guilty to some or all of the charges They in cluded Gen Leopold Okulicki commander of the underground Polish home army and Jan Jan kowski vice premier of the Po lish exile government in London and head of the former under ground cabinet in Warsaw Zelinski said the Polish under ground government in Warsaw on Feb 19 1944 issued instructions indicating that the general line BULLETIN Moscow UR Gen Leopold Okulicki commander of the Polish Nome army testified Tuesday that he had orders to fight anybody who infringed on the independ ence of Poland including the red army of the whole Polish underground was to prepare for armed strug gle against the soviet union Radio Moscow reported He said he was responsible di rectly to the delegate of Polish underground in Wilno a man named Siedorowicz who in turn was in contact with Warsaw Radio Moscow reported that the soviet prosecutor turned to Jan kowskl m the prisonersdock and asked him to confirm that Siedor owicrand Zelinski were acting on his instructions Jankowski was unable to deny the fact that the whole activity of the Polish underground was di rected against the soviet unions the soviet broadcast said Zelinski also was said to have testified that he was instructed ov the underground to build rela tions with soviet authorities and the red army command diplo matically Wives Kin of GPs in Occupation Forces to Join Washington UR Wives and kin of U S soldiers serving as oc cupation forces in Germany will be permitted to live with them in Germany Gen Dwight D Eisen hower indicated Monday at his press conference Stating that a policy would ul timately be worked out he ex plained that housing food and other problems precluded that at present TRUMAN FLIES TO WEST COAST To Visit Washington Proceed to Frisco BULLETIN Washington UR The senate gave President Truman a major foreign policy victory Tuesday by voting him authority to cut tarif rates 50 per cent below Jan 1 levels Washington Tru man left by plane at a m central war time Tuesday for i west coast visit he will climax bj attending the San Francisco united nations security conference The president planned an 11 hour nonstop flight to Olympia Wash where he will pay a socia visit to Gov Mon C Wallgren before going to San Francisco tt address the closing session of th security conference The president was given a cheery sendaff by Gen Dwight D Eisen hower Americas returned hero whose plane the Sunflower rested just behind the president special C54 waiting to take tin general to a big New York wel coming Others in the small group at th army air transport command run way included Acting Secretary o State Joseph C Grew and Secre tary of the Treasury Henry Mor genthau The president paused at the top of the ramp leading to his plan to wave to photographers H asked them what do yon wan me to say fiddlesticks recalUn the remarks of his 92 year ol mother as she alighted from plane on the same spot from Kan sas City Mo a few weeks ago BULLETIN Indianapolis An Casey of Mason City fired a 41 lead Joanne Barr Tracy of Dallas Tex 3 up at the end of the firs 9 holes of Tuesdays firstroun competition in the West ern open golf tournament here Phyllis Otto of Atlantic th other lowan entered in the tour ney led Jean Hutto of City 2 up at the tarn with 38 HOUSE SPEAKER WOULD MOVE TO PRESIDENCY Truman Recommends Legislation Fixing Order of Succession Washington IP President ruman recommended legisla ion Tuesday placing the speaker if the house first in order of suc ession to the presidency in case if vacancies in both the presi leney and vice presidency In a special message to both louses of congress sent shortly after he took off on a nonstop flight to Olympia VVash the president said the question of succession is of great import ance now because there will be no elected vice president for al most 4 years Mr Truman who entered the white house from the vice presi dency on the death of President Roosevelt April 12 said the ex sting succession law enacted in 1886 provides for members of the cabinet to take over the presi dency in the event that neither president president can serve The order of succession is The secretaries of state treasury and war attorney general postmaster jeneral and secretaries of navy nterior and labor Pointing out that each of these cabinet members is appointed by he president Mr Truman said 1 now lies within his power to nominate his immediate succes sor In the event of my own death or inability to act I do not believe that in a de mocracy this power should rest with the chief executive Insofar as possible the office of the pres ident should be filled by an elec tive officer He recommended that the speaker be next in line of suc cession and that he should serve not longer than until the next congressional election or until a special election call for the pur pose of electing a new president and vice president This period the congress should fix he asserted The individuals elected at such general or spe cial election should then serve only to fill the unezpired term of the farmer president and vice president New Yorkputdoes ItSjelf n Welcoming Eisenhower AUSSIES PUSH THROUGH JUNGLE Make New Unopposed Landing in Borneo Drive Manila troops drove through the jungles of north Borneo Tuesday toward the grea rubber center of Beaufort after a new unopposed landing on the shores of Brunei bay The Australians made their shoretoshore operation as Amer ican forces in northern Luzon con tinned their Cagayan valley push unchecked by the Japanese The new landing in which Americanmanned buffaloes am phibious tractors carried the Aus tralians was made at Weston a small railhead on the eastern shore of Brunei bay Beaufort is 15 miles northeast of Weston The buffaloes moved upstream on the Padas river which runs past Beaufort then lumbered ashore on the jungled banks Other troops worked their way along the bombruined railroac from Weston to Beaufort Australian troops on the opposit shores of Brunei bay took the oi refinery town of Tutong bnt man grove swamps stopped them from advancing along the coast to thi Seria and Miri oilfields U Snavy minesweepers con tinued their work in the water of the oilfields and United Pres Correspondent Richard Harri again reported from Borneo they were clearing the way for pos sible future operations Buy your War Bonds and Stamps from your GlobeGazette carrier boy Jap Shell Kills Buckner LOth Army Commander in Hour of Victory on Okinawa INCREASED NAVAL ACTIVITY REPORTED IN PA naval activity around Okinawa 1 was reported as ground forces moved to dean out the Jap pocket while to the south unconfirmed enemy broadcasts told of a naval bombardment of bypassed Truk 2 and of an allied fleet approaching Balikpapan 3 on Borneo Troops of Gen MacArthurs command consolidated hold ings in the Brunei Bay area and advanced on Luzon in the Philippines Chinese troops continued attacks on the Jap corridor 5 from IndoChina AP Wirephoto New York ew Yorkers lined 38 miles treets Tuesday milling on side alks and hanging from trees in Central park and from skyscraper indows to give General of the Army Dwight D Eisenhower a onquering heros welcome The sky was overcast but the redaction of rain failed to ampen the spiritof the multi udes who struggled for a glimpse f the lean bald blueeyed man The worlds biggest city was de ermined to give its biggest hero iis biggest welcome Flags and bunting fluttered in soft breeze along the 38 mile larade route where millions waited on aching feet The civil ans were afoot Tuesday There vere no marching soldiers remi liscent of the World war I pa ades down 5th avenue Eisen lower and company victors in mechanized war rode in automo biles The generals sunburn picked up in Mondays Washington re ception got some comfort from the cloudy sky as New York greeted him determined to outdo he receptions given the allied su rcme commander in London aris and if it meant disregarding a plea by Wayor Fiorello H LaGuardia to skip the traditional ticker tape shower along hero Jroadway The telephone company re cently distributed new 2 inch hick directories as though adding to the stockpile of ticker tape and waste paper The generals plane was sched uled to land at LaGuardia field at 10 a m Eisenhower was the 3rd Ameri can war hero to be given the city The others were Admiral Ueorge Dewey on his return from Manila bay and Gen John J Pershing when he returned from Europe after World war I The roaring welcome Tuesday was New Yorks first big recep tion since Bobby Jones returned from England 15 years ago after scoring golfdoms only grand slam Grover Whalen traditional city welcomer for a generation was on land to greet the general as he stepped from the presidential plane at LaGuardia field With tlim were Mayor LaGuardia anc high ranking army officers from the eastern command It was the first time a returning tiero was welcomed without the screech of New Y o r ks harbor tugs All other welcomes began in New York bay Eisenhower was the first to fly to his reception A 15 minute welcome at La Guardia Monday with punctuated by a 17 gun salute The 25 car mo torcade then started on the 38 mile parade past the cheering millions From LaGuardia field the pa rade route led over Tribbrough change in temper Weather Report FORECAST Mason City Fair Tuesday Wednesday No decided change in temperature Iowa Partly cloudy Tuesday and Wednesday with a few widely scattered light showers day Little ature Minnesota Generally fair Tuesdaj night and Wednesday little change in temperature IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weatherstatistics Maximum Monday 74 Minimum Monday 50 At 8 a m Tuesday 53 YEAR AGO Maximum 80 Minimum 50 Precipitation 02 bridge into Manhattan for a slow ride to South Ferry and a swin back to City hall There Ike was given a spe cially struck gold medal There 530 wounded army an navy personnel were waiting i special seats to watch the cere monies U S 10th Army Iklnawa Gen Simon lolivar Buckner Jr who had pre icted that with any kind of luck he fierce Okinawa campaign vould end this week was killed Monday by a Japanese shell al most at the moment of final vic ory by his 10th army The sturdy KentuckUn who at 58 had won a reputation for ag ressiveness and discipline was the lighest ranking American to die by enemy action in the Pacific war and was the 22nd general of Icer killed or missing In action against Germany and Japan Death came at a forward ob servation post as Buckner watched he marine 8th regimental combat arrived on Okinawa southward against the retreating Japanese in a climactic assault on the southern tip of the sland The first Japanese shell to strike that vicinity all day burstdirectly on a rock where he was seated A arge fragment of steel or coral pierced his left chest Several more shells struck the MKition so that marine officers lad to carry Buckner to shelter behind a cliff before first aid and plasma could be administered Ten minutes after he was hit Gen Buckner died Command of the 10th army and of the ground forces in the Ryu cyus devolved immediately upon Maj Gen Hoy S Geiger com mander of the marine 3rd am phibious corps a part of the loth army Geiger recently wasnomi nated for lieutenant general Only the day before Buckners deathAdmNimitz stoutly had defended Buckners Okinawa op erations against criticism by news paper columnist David Lawrence Calling an unprecedented piess conference at Guam Nimitz had declared his faith in Buckners tactical decisions and highly praised the 10th army leader He asserted that criticism of the slowness of the campaign and of failure to land behind enemy lines was due to the columnist being misinformed Nimitz said a plan to land behind the enemys Shuri line already had been investigated and found impracticable and dan gerous Funeral services for the general were held at 9 a m Tuesday at a 7th infantry division near Hagushi beach cemetery Thus ended the career of the second American lieutenant gen eral to bear the name of Simon Bolivar Buckner The first was his father who was forced to surrender Fort Don elson to Gen U S Grant early in the Civil war but who was ex changed and rose to a lieutenan general before that war ended Later he was governor of Ken tucky where Simon Jr was born near Munfordville July 18 1886 The general is survived by his widow and by 2 sons and a daugh ter Simon Boliver Buckner III is a captain in the signal corps in Eu rope William Claiborne Buckner is a West Point cadet and May Buckner is a Red Cross worker in San Francisco where Mrs Buck ner also resides GEN SIMON B BUCKNER BELGIAN KING WONT ABDICATE Leopold Says He Will Reassume His Throne Salzberg Austria UR King Leopold of the Belgians Tuesday rejected clamorous demands that IB abdicate and announced that ie was reassuming his full consti tutional prerogatives There isno question of His Majesty abdicating said a state ment authorized by Leopold and issued to the allied press by one of his aides Capt Gatien Viscount Du Pare The king has decided to return o Belgium and again take over the throne after 5 years in Ger man hands and a few weeks as a juest of the American army since his liberation by the 106th cavalry group of the 15th corps U S 7th army The announcement of Leopolds decision came 3 days after the Belgian government of Premier Achille von Acker resigned in protest against his return In re signing Saturday the government said it was unwilling to take re sponsibility for event which it regarded as inevitable if the king went home to rule the country The Icing having decided to re turn to his country the govern ment has resigned Leopolds statement said From this mo ment the king has reassumed ef fectively his full constitutional prerogatives BritishDane Trade Resumed London1 The importation of food from Denmark to Britain be resumed Thursday when tons of butter and 230 tons of eggs will be unloaded at Hull it will 680 LAST PLANNED RESISTANCE ON ISLAND BROKEN 2nd Marine Division Pacific Veterans Aid in Final Assault Guam U S 10th army broke all planned resistance on southern Okinawa and drove Tues day toward imminent final victory to avenge the death of its com mander on the field of battle Washington announced Tuesday atternoon that a very large force of Superfortresses from the Marianas struck again at Japans resources attacking industrial areas in central Honshu and northern Kyushu Shortly before he fell mortally wounded from a shell bunt Mon day Lt Gen Simon Bolivar Buck ner Jr declared that with 2 dry days he could cut them to pieces and a field dispatch reported that task now was accomplished Buckner had held back a sur prise the 2nd marine division and those veterans of Tarawa and Sai pan roared into the Okinawa bat tle for the 1st time crushing in the enemys west flank Only hours before a Japanese shell fragments struck Buckner the final assaulthits its full mo mentum and while Adm Chester W Nimitz did not proclaim the campaign ended he asserted the day of Buckners death was the day of victory The mauled remains of a Japa nese garrison that numbered at least 85000 when the struck 80 dayi agohave herded Into hardly more than 6 square miles of the southern Up They have been swept from most of Yaeju plateau bulwark of their last line of defense and with their backs to the sea held posi tions 3 miles wide and nowhere more than two and a half miles deep Nimitz in a message to Gen George C Marshall chief of stalf said Buckners death came at a time when the fall of Okinawa is imminent Nlmltz in effect announced the capture of Okinawa when he mes saged the generals troops x x x All of us take pride In the day of victory on which he gallantly met a soldiers death Fully cognizant however that some 10000 Japanese remain to be killed or captured before Okin awa can be declared secured from a military standpoint Nimitz carefully refrained from announc ing the end of organized resistance He has followed that policy throughout the Pacific campaigns under his command Although some Japanese were fleeing in the southwestern sector thousands of others fought back as savagely as any time in the 80day old Okinawa campaign It was just such counterartil lery killed Buck was announced Tuesday The Danish dairy products are being exchanged for British coal Buy your War Bonds and Stampsfrom your GlobeGazette carrier boy Maj Gen Boy S Geiger com mander of the 3rd marine amphibi ous corps on Okinawa and recent ly nominated for lieutenant gen eral was placed in command of the 10th army for duration of the Okinawa campaign EISENHOWER MEETS HIS CHIEFBoth grin as President Harry S Truman greets Gen Dwight D Eisenhower at the white house when Eisenhower was awarded an oak leaf cluster m lieu of this 3rd distinguished service medal AP Wirephoto Kayenay en PoleCzech Dispute Over Line Flares By UNITED PRESS Tension in the PolishCzecho slovak border dispute was height ened Tuesday with the arrival of a Polish army contingent in Tes chen the Silesian frontier city claimed by both countries A radio Lublin broadcast re layed by the London radio said the troops were led by Marshal R o 1 aZymierski commanderin chief of the Polish Warsaw gov ernment army Teschen and the surrounding area adjoin the northeastern fron tier of Czechoslovakia The rich industrial district was given to Czechoslovakia after World war I but was occupied by Polish troops in the fall of 1938 after the Mu nich agreement Czech spokesmen have laid claim to the area since the reestablish ment of their government but a Prague broadcast Tuesday denied that they want to annex all Si lesia It is true howevtr the Czech government considers carrying out a number of corrections of the former CzechGerman frontier the broadcast added   

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