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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: May 18, 1945 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - May 18, 1945, Mason City, Iowa                             All THE NT OF HISTORY AMD OE8 KOINES IA NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME THi NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES AWL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS MASON IOWA AY MAY ig ARTILLERY DUELS RAGE ON OKINAWA INSIDE WASHINGTON Hershey Disturbed Over Fore of Returning Vets getting dis turbed over the future of the re turning veteran said Selective Kraft Director Brig Gen Lewis B Hershey while testifying be fore the senate military affairs committee the other day I dont want to see the jobs we promised to hold for them while they were at war filled before they get back The general tucked under his chin the spec tacles he had been using on sta tistical reports and continued In the next 6 months men will ne let out at the rate of 200000 a month Weve got to find places for most of them I agree completely with General Hershey The men who were taken off to fight your var and mine to expose themselves lo death and injury while we con tinue to live comfortably in this agreeable country should have every human chance at rehabili tation whatever the sacrifice lo the stayathomes Vice Admiral Charles II Mc aiorris whose delightful wife lives in Washington and on the fam ily farm in Pennsylvania has more than several things to do at Guam where he is acting chief staff for Adm Chester Nimitz On the outside of the door lead ing to his official headquarters Vice Admiral McMorris hung a announcing in large let ters Dont go away nad But go A tetter daledxNew Tears 1945 from a German prison camp says Our Christmas dinner was swell Had turkey one teaspoonful of potatoes one teaspoonful of peas and 12 desserts We had saved up the desserts from gift packages for the big celebration s I made one ot the desserts was rrJrice pie up Sparn some raisins arid drated butterscotch pudding This letter is from Manila dated April 20 Ive seen Gen Douglas MacArthur twice Once at the me morial service for Mr Roosevelt and once dashing to his limousine from the building where we both work Hes a god around here as you can well imagine Mighty handsome and looks years younger than he is He and his family live in a magnificent house on the edge of the city one of the few places the Japs did not destroy Im cer tain that not even Warsaw or Budapest could have been as completely devastated as this once beautiful city Seems to me that Eric Johnston used to have some decided ideas about 4 terms in the white house Not long ago Johnston was elected to an unprecedented fourth term as president of the United States chamber of com merce The number of callers at the house has become so large in this new administration that some newspapers are threatening to ask for more news print in or der to find room for the space taking list Also it is reported that all Washingtonbound trains coming out of Missouri have had lo put on extra sleepers to accommodate those who knew Harry Truman when are that Mrs Tru man will not assume a brisk pub lic manner Heard a report of the longest speech the presidents wife ever made It was given at a dinner in honor of herself and her husband by the P E O of which Mrs Truman is a member The P E O is an educational society Its membership is en tirely feminine What P E O stands for the ladies wont say Some of the men have remarked that its probably Phone Each Other Anyhow the husband of a PE O is called a BIL At he meeting I refer to someone rose to give a toast To Bess Truman and her BIL Mrs Truman blushed and smiled Said hesitatingly Ex cept lor that reception the home folks in Independence gave Harry and me at Christmas this is the nicest party I ever attended And sat down HOLD OUT HOPE OF ABANDONING POWER OF VETO Stassen Says U S Will Oppose Chinese Trusteeship Amendment San Fraucisco Brit ain is holding out hope to little countries at the united nations conference that the veto power of the big 5 may gradually be aband oned as the world organization grows it was learned Friday Neither Britain nor any other big 5 nation has any intention of yielding now to modification of the voting formula for the security council It was adopted by the bijr 3 at Yalta and granls each of the big 5 nations a veto over virtually any decision by lie security council But the little nations have served notice that their accept ance of the voting formula be only acquies cence The long awaited debate on this controversial issue began in the conference committee on security council procedure late Thursday New Zealand Australia and the Netherlands led the attack and British permanent undersecretary ot state for foreign affairs Sir Alexander Cadogan did the de fending His defense was based on the theme that the unanimity of the big 5 is needed at this time if the world organization is to succeed The special position of the big powers can be justified he said by realizing that they represent more than half of the worlds pop ulation Any falling out of the big powers would result in war any way hVargued and the unanimity rule among thoin is especially needed in the stages of the organization Conference action on the reg ional formula has been delayed since Tuesday night because of failure of Moscow to instruct the Russian delegation here how to vote A big 5 meeting scheduled for Thursday was suddenly can celled because of no word from the Kremlin The conference committee on the regionl issue is scheduled to meet Friday afternoon and the United States may present the formula on its own and not wait for Russias replay The delay caused considerable worry in high quarters lest the Russians create another crisis over the regional issue by belatedly de ciding not to approve it The form ula would allow the InterAmeri can system to operate in self de fense in cases where the security council failed to maintain the peace but would in general rec ognize supremacy of the world or ganization over any regional group The trusteeship issue again was down by new discord among the big powers China and Russia sought to make the ob jective of the trusteeship system the eventual selfgovernment and independence of all dependent j poples Britain and the United j Stales disapproved of the word independence Cmdr Harold E Stassen of tile U S delegation finally inter vened reminding the delegates that the success of the whole con ference was dependent upon agree ment by the big powers He in sisted that the Chinese amend ment went beyond the working paper and served notice that the United States would oppose it Yanks Close in on Field at Valencia Manila troops on Mindanao Friday closed in on Valencia and its important 2 strip airfield after a surge of 6 miles along the Sayre highway A communique which gave the 31st divisions position as of Wed nesday put the leading elements in the outskirts of Valencia and only Z miles from the airdrome The 31st had slashed ahead 6 miles Wednesday and 5 miles the day before and there were no in USS FRANKLIN LISTS WHILE APIRB OFF The Essexclass carrier TJSS Franklin lists badly while burning off the coast of Japan While participating in an air strike against the Japanese fleet in the Inland sea last March 19 she was hit by two 500pound armorpiercing bombs but survived and 5s now at Brooklyn navy yardfor repairs Carrier Returns From Japan brighter chances that appeared following account was written by Alvin S McCoy of the Kansas City Star the only corre spondent aboard the aircraft car rier U S SFranklin when it was struck by a lone Japanese bomber March 19 only 66 miles off the coast of Japan The ship was saved but more than 1000 men were killed and 804 British Ships Sunk During War London UR British naval losses in World war II have reached 804 ships one of them a cruiser rammed and sunk by the former luxury liner Queen Mary an unofficial tabulation showed Friday The loss of 162 of the ships was revealed Thursday night by the admiralty The sinkings had been kept secret in the belief that the Germans did not know of them By ALVIN S IHcCOV Kansas City Star Correspondent Aboard the U S S Santa Fe in the Western Pacific March 20 A full day after the carrier Franklin was bombed bodies floated by us in the sea dropped from the car rier ahead in a seemingly end less stream as burial services went on interminably McCoy and 825 other surviv ors were removed by the cruiser Santa Fe a Jew hours after the disaster Meanwhilethe Frank lins remaining crew fought the seemingly impossible situation to save the stricken ship which had been taken in tow and headed away from At G oclock tonight Captain Fit of the Santa Fe announced over the public address system Today he said the Franklin cast off its tow I have just re ceived a report that she is able to make 21 knots We have come 207 miles from where the Frank lin was hit but we are still only 225 miles from places where the Jap airfields are located Each chances minute the Franklins for survival seemed incredibly slim when she wounded off Nippons shores The Franklin was blasted by more than 30 tons of its own bombsand rockets after the Japa nese bomber struck it and it erupted 4 hours yesterday off the coast of Japan to cause one of the most horrible naval catas trophes of the war Blotted out by smoke tower ing a mile high when she was hit wracked by intermittent ex plosions of her own ammunition for 4 hours dead in the sea 60 odd miles from southern Japan and listing almost 20 degrees to starboard the Franklin appeared a certain candidate for Davy Jones locker Surviving more cruel punish ment than any ship ever has tak en before and still remained afloat the Franklin astonished everyone in the task force group First placed in tow and tugged painfully southward at 3 knots the wounded flattop picked up speed while still smoking got her engines started and a day later was churning toward a friendly port at 21 knots under her own power the toucast off Engines and hull were almost intact Capt L E Gchres who would not give up his ship and his small remaining crew brought the fires under control Destroyers and cruisers scoured the sea for 10 mites picking up the men who had been blown driven or who leaped overboard It was in the American tradition of making every possible effort to save hu risk Superb seamanship was one ofthe major factors hi making the dual rescue of ship and men possible Most of the casualties were sustained in the first few minutes after the bomb struck as gasoline and explosives on the flight and hangar decks went up in blinding sheets of flame that scared many men to a crisp in a flash The lone Jap bomber dropped down out ol the overcast to place a bomb on thebusy flattop just be fore a m as planes were taking off on a mission nearly 5 hours the Frank lin lay dead as the crew struggled to get the flames under control and save the ship Meanwhile other ships removed all but a skeleton crew The Santa Fe took aboard 826 persons including 90 wounded A destroyer the Hunt removed or picked up 417 the Marshall saved 212 and several other ships saved lesser numbers The Franklins pilots who were in the air landed safely on other ships Shorlly after noon he tow the Franklin began lust then a Japanese plane the through the prolec patrol planes helping the stricken Franklin dived toward the carrier and released its bomb The bomb missed sending up a great gey ser off the carriers stern Ships in the convoy sent up a hail of fire Survivors on the San ta Fe their nerves shaken dashed below still wearing their life jackets and steel helmets A 2nd dications slowed their advance had but did not attempt a bomb run Both were reported shot down by patrol planes The Jap plane that bombed the Franklin was shot down a few moments later by the Franklins own air group commander Com mander EB Parker who was in the air 18 minutes before the bombing and was circling waiting for his command to come up His kill was confirmed as the Jap plane plummeted straight dosvn into the sea from 2500 feet TJie crew of the Franklin la bored propitiously to control the fires and lean up the ship The carrier crawled away under tow at 3 knots while carriers and de stroyers swept round in a circle The Franklins engines were started and speed was stepped up to 4 knots 5 knots and then 6 knots Each turn of the screws seemed that much closer to safety The rescue of the crippled ship and the saving of a majority of the crews lives provided one the most amazing epics in Ameri can naval history The ship that To the north however the 40th division met still opposition from Japanese artillery and mortar po sitions in the Mangina canyon The 40th was working its way south through difficult hilly country carpeted with 12 foot high irass The 2 divisions were 31 air lines miles or 35 miles along the winding Sayre highway from a junction which would split Min danao lengthwise The 31st already was being supplied by planes landing on the Maramag airstrip captured last week The fall ot Valencia would provide 2 more excellent air strips lor the ferrying of sup plies and the Hying ot close sup port missions On Luzon seasonal rains con tinued to hamper American ad vances but the battle for Ipo dam appeared nearing a close The 43rd division continued closing in on a Japanese force trapped in the dam area northeast of Manila and only a matter of hundreds of yards separated its north and south forces Beyond Balete pass in northern Luzon the 25th division which had advanced due north and the 32nd division which cut in from the west joined forces for an at tack on Santa Fe Fridays com munique reported enemy troops steadily were being driven back on Santa Fe A Japanese counter altack was repulsed in that area Australian forces on Tarakan island off Borneos east coast drove down the Amal track within a mile of the islands east coast A Japanese counterattack north of Tarakan city was turned back wouldnt he sunk couldnt be of i sunk The fight to save the mighty first o slip j carrier had begun immediately live cover of although commanding officers on other ships believed it impossible Damage and fire control parlies labored indominately amidships playing fire hoses on the flames while shrapnel burst around them Capt Gehres standing on the bridge atthe time was knocked down by the blast and almost suf focated by smoke but was unin jured Buy your AVar Bonds and Stamps from your GlobeGazette carrier boy Weather Report FORECAST Mason City Mostly cloudy Friday night and Saturday with show ers Saturday No decided change in temperature lowat Mostly cloudy Friday night and Saturday Light rain in northwest Friday night and scattered showers in west and central portions Saturday No decided change in temperature Minnesota Cloudy Friday night and Saturday Light rain ex treme west portion Friday night showers most of state Saturday Warmer east portion Friday night IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette Weather Statistics Maximum Thursday S4 Minimum Thursday 35 At 8 a m Friday 46 Heavy Frost YEAR AGO Maximum 35 Minimum 50 Precipitation 14 EXPLOSION ROCKS BATTERED USS FRANKLINDebris flies aloft and crewmen iun for safety as an explosion rocks the burning Essexclass carrier USS Franklin hit by Japanese bombs less than 60 miles from the Japanese mainland where she was one of a force of U S ships attacking the Japanese fleet in the Inland sea action Jap plane appeared 2 hours later abandon this ship he tokl his commanding officers Each succeeding explosion ap p peared to make loss of the ship inevitable The captain alone could make the decision and his 1 faith held fasf i Capt Harold C Fitz command ing the Santa Fe a light cruiser was ordered to assume command of the rescue operation within an hour pfler the bombing Four de stroyers were detailed to assist The Santa Fe took some lines and came alongside once its fire lioses playing on the flaming car rier deck then cast off when there xvas doubt whether the car riers magazines had been flooded The carrier rocked with a mighty explosion at the stern about 10 oclock 3 hours after the bomb ing Circling quickly the cruiser charged in across the bow turned starboard and stopped almost rubbing the carriers decks The wholesale evacuation began as the ships pounded together in the swell A broken 3or 4inch gasoline line in the after part of the hangar deck spitted flaming 100 oclane fuel tor several hours turning that part into a cauldron of fire Burning gasoline spilled over the side of the carrier and blazed on the sea below Fire hoses from the cruiser would not reach this area I was watching and saw 3 men go into that fire and smoke and British Sink Jap Cruiser in Malacca Strait Wednesday London warships penetrating the Malacca strait northwest of Singapore for the first time in 3 years sank a Japa nese 8inch gun cruiser of 10000 tons Wednesday the admiralty announced Friday The cruiser was attacked first by carrier aircraft and finally by destroyers 50 miles west south west of Penang island off the Malayan peninsula A British de stroyer suffered a small number of casualties in the engagement Japan has 4 10000ton Nati class curisers the Nati Myoko Asigara and Haguro They carry a complement of 692 officers and men NAMED ALTERNATE New York Wey er Hastings Nebr Friday was named as an alternate for one of 3 Pulitzer traveling scholarships awarded lo students in Columbia universitys graduate school of journalism This was the first year that the scholarships were won by women students MARINES FIGHT IN YONABARU SHURIANDNAHA Heavy Jap Defense Limits American Gains to Yards Feet great artillery duel of unprecedented fury in the Pa cific war flared along the Oki nawa battle line Friday as 10th army forces fought yard by yard nto the 3 wrecked bastion towns of Naha Shuri and Yonabaru Tokyo reported without allied confirmation that a powerful American fleet steamed out of the Marianas last Sunday or Monday presumably for new forays against the Japanese empire Front dispatches indicated U S ground forces were battling in side Shuri and Yonabaru as well as in Naha where marines of the 3th division expanded n hardwon bridgehead across the Asato iver The enemy reported earlier that American troops broke into Shuri the inland anchor of the Japanese defense line lying midway be tween Naha on the west coast and Yonabaru on the east Nowhere were the Americans making biff advances The Japa nese supported by the heaviest concentration of artillery ever as sembled by the enemy in the Pa cific war limited Yank gains to yards and feet Front dispatches said marines deep inside Naha were cracking fanatic Japanese resistance there But later reports said the leather necks in Naha were pinned to many positions and that only small amounts of equipment had crossed the Asato river at the edge ol the city Shells from big Japanese and American guns crashed ceaselessly into the lines ofstruggling infan trymen strung out along the mile coasttocoast baltlefront Japanese artillery was massed on high ground in the rear of Naha Shuri and Yonabaru It was powerful enough to return the fire of one of the greatest American land naval and aerial bombard ments in history East of Naha the first marines and 2 army 77th and to swing the American flank southward The longterm objective of this drive was occupation ot the southern tip of the island The 77th commanded by Maj Gen Andrew Bruce was attaching Shuri while the 9Bth stormed Yonabaru A Tokyo broadcast referring to the purported U S fleet move ment out of the Marianas said although it is not definitely known whether it is directed to ward the Okinawas or not its ac tivities require a rigid watch Okinawas best airfield Naha airdrome lies about a mile south west of Naha across an enclosed harbor It undoubtedly will be the primary airfield of many pro jected lor Okinawa to mount growing air strikes against the Japanese homeland Bombers arc ready and waiting A Buy your War Bonds and Stamps from your GlobeGazette carrier boy for iiekl room on Okinawa only 325 miles from the southern Japa nese home islands to start the fi nal air neutralization campaign against the enemy American forces already have captured Yontan and Katena air fields in central Okinawa and put them into use and a few days ago shut that line off L E Blair chief carpenter on the cruiser related It was about 3 hours j after the ship was hit It wasnt I until then that they were able to begin lo bring the fire under con trol I dont know who they were but if those boys are alive they sure deserve a medal Blair said that 40millimeter shells were going off like fire crackers and finally 5inch shells on one of lie after gun mounts began exploding cutting Z of the cruisers 5 fire hoses Flames blazed around the mounts i even coming out gun muzzles A final explosion at the stem of the carrier rocked it again about 11 oclock By this time the Franklin was listing so steeply to starboard to ward the cruiser that it was dif ficult to keep ones footing on the decks Once the wounded were across men began scrambling to get aboard the cruiser About p m the cruiser cast off ending a ticklish time when both were vulnerable to Japanese air attacks The still smoking Franklin took a line from another cruiser and was placed in tow limping along south The impossible was happening The unsinkablc Franklin was heading toward safety almost from the shores of Japan Support the 7th Buy War Bonds A statement by Gen Omar N Bradley commander of the 12th army group in Belgium The victory volunteer who calls upon you at your home or place of work speaks for every soldier when he asks you lo buy extra war bonds News of your personal participation in the 7th AVar Loan Is the best kind of news from home   

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