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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: May 10, 1945 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - May 10, 1945, Mason City, Iowa                             QEPAftTMCNT OF HJSTOHY ANO es NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME Associated Press and United Press Pull Leased Wires San Francisco EDITORS is the ii to a series of stories about the San Francisco conference written specially for the Globe Gazette by the Rev John D Clinton of the First Methodist church of Iowa Falls By JOHN D CLINTON CAN you thought the 2 letters S F meant First or Self First But out west at Frisco it goes further than that She is the city of St Francis naturally and the Catho lic cnurch did a beautiful job for the conference the first Sunday And who should Be preaching at a most colorful mass in the Civic auditorium than Bishop Duane Hunt of Salt Lake City who was graduated from Cornell college in Iowa and was later honored with a D D from said Methodist in stitution I remembered him as a science teacher in Waverly high school after college days and the cultivating there of a friendship which lead to his entry into the priesthood Looking for color photography I had shot the altar in the audito rium banked with whole trees brought in for the occasion lined with silk Hags and framed with Californias finest flowers Arch bishop John Mitty was duly throned At the close of the mass I stepped into the processional in the outer hall to get a picture Duane for Iowa which he gladly gave although he wasnt sure of the archbishop coming out Brother Mitty was pretty busy The cops had him centered in a hall The delegates especi ally from Catholic countries wished to take his hand and so did I My ceremonies were shorter than his members I told him I graduated from the same college as Bishop Duane He told me hac seen the leadership in this young lowan while he himself served Utah and as we stood hand in hanc I asked for his picture Ill give you the whole thing he said arid a cop hustled a cop who hustled another copr to that golden crook that chief shep herd of the Homan Catholicdio cese AS I shot him up stepped a fine appearing delegate in civilian clothes the wind turning back his lapel to show upon his vest a sil ver chaplains cross and beneath it bars enough to make a greal bouquet I shot him and he seemec quite happy to have been in com pany with a Catholic prelate and asked me for a print the Arch bishop I asked him what parish he served and he laughingly said Im am Chaplain Carruthers oi the Presbyterian church As I said S F out here stands for Something Further About this time a mob had taken over the corner just an American mob Autographers had stumbled on to another celebrity this time in the person of aiinister of War Francis Forde of Australia He had a campaign on his hands A good camera was the password again and having parted the mob like Moses straightened out the Red Sea I felt called to make a speech The minister had flutter Inp papers so pushed to him he I i couldnt even see to write on the I J one in his hands i V My speech was Lets be Amer lf leans and not swrie Push back cops who had been looking for him for his waiting car caught up with him He was whisked away and the populace started pushing paper toward me One man came up and told me hed know me from my picture as Minister Forde I got along quite well autographing U and attempting to laugh off a who insisted I was the minister and should favor them I told them that all I was was a Methodist minister attempting for the moment to be a body guard for an Australian who was being used as a pusharound TN this same auditorium where j j Bishop Hunt called for right pusness that exalts a nation in the 3 Orson Wells in person J vas the last of a battery of speak that evening to appeal This i peace can be not a jalopy of pic ture wire and chewing gum pro posals Peace must have a perma nent sense of righteousness no less essential than the sun John Lawson of the Hollywood writers spoke Many delegates in cluding the unlipsticked Dean Gildersleeve spoke briefly so that this huge audience of Mr and Mrs Public coold see the celebrities of many fields Waller Winchell ar rived He threw kisses and chal lenges Maybe you heard him say Eden means garden and Molotov means hammer but you and I know that President Truman means business and wed better be ready to help him get it done What a night that was for an lowan in the Court of the World 1 On the way home through streets jammed with 20 sailors passing each street intersection ARMY REVEALS POINT SYSTEM FOR DISCHARGE Service Parenthood Rank Highest in Values 85 Points Minimum Washington i The army Thursday set up its point system for release enlisted personnel in the wake of victory in Europe temporarily fixing a minimum score oC 85 points as a requisite for such discharges The points are to be figured on the basis of service credit over seas duty participation in com bat parenthood The 85 minimum points will be required for the discharge of ground air and service forces enlisted personnel Men with this total will be con sidered eligible for release and will start movinsr next week for separation centers Separate critical scores for each of the services will be established in about 6 weeks About 1300000 men are to be released in the next 12 months under the point system The points for each of 4 factors for discharge are as follows Service point for each month of army service since Sept 16 1940 This is the same as 12 points per year More than 15 days will be counted as a full month Overseas point for each month served overseas since Sept 16 1940 Combat Credit 5 points for each award of combat decorations since Sept 16 1940 Parenthood Credit points for each child under 18 years up to a limit of 3 children Those who attain the required score will Tie released unless mili tary necessity dictates their re tention until replacements can be obtained A temporary score of 44 points has been set for members of the womens army corps The combat credits are based on awards of the distinguished service cross legion of merit sil ver star distinguished flying cross soldiers medal bronze star medal air medal purple heart and bronze service stars battle par ticipation stars Credit also will be given for the following naval decorations to army personnel Navy cross dis tinguished service medal legion of merit silver star medal dis tinguished flying cross navy and marine medal bronze star medal air medal and purple heart medal In addition credit will be given for awards and decorations of a foreign country which may be ac cepted ana worn under war de partment regulations in effect when this program went into op eration The department said the method for releasing officers will b tougher than the plan for en listed personnel primarily because officers have received additional training have heavier responsi bilities and have developed spe cialized skills and leadership ca pacity department said although officers will have an adjusted service ratings score based on the same multiples as for enlisted personnel this factor will be the secondary to the prime requirement of military necessity The department said enlisted men with the highest point totals will become eligible for release from the army except where con siderations of military necessity make it impossible to let them go until qualified replacements can be obtained This exception applies particularly to men pos sessing special skills required in the war against Japan and to men in units that will have to move to the Pacific so swiftly that no op portunity is provided for replac ing men with high scores until they reach the new theater1 Because of the special require ments of the war against Japan the strength of the army service forces and air forces will be re duced much less than the strength of ground forces As a result the initial rate of release will be more rapid among ground troops than among those assigned to air forces or service forces the department said However through transfers of some lowscore forces and new trainees a proportionate share of men will be released from all 3 forces as rapidly as practicable1 er minute our street car motor man said When most of these women get hold of a sailors arm hey cant think of anything else He stepped on his floor gong for 5 clangs That sailor surely did move S F may stand for Sailor irst to a few people but in San Francisco it is still standing most of the time for most people for Something Further Nations Work on Charter for World San Francisco united nations conference sought to speed up its work on a world organiza tion charier Thursday after ten tatively approving an amendment to make the general assembly a town meeting of the world Officials the four conference commissions were called to a spe cial meeting at a m PWT to study ways of speeding up the deliberations and completing the work here the end of the month The steering committee made up of the heads of all delegations also scheduled a morning meeting and may make some formal rec ommendations for expediting com mittee work Some top delegates including Soviet Foreign Commissar V M Molotov already had left confi dent that most of the principal hurdles have been cleared The conference which now includes 48 delegations will greet its 49th Thursday with the arrival of Ar gentine representatives The conference took its first steps toward actual writing ot the world charier Wednesday night when a committee approved an amendment originally sponsored by Sen Arthur V Vandenber Mich The amendment would give the lower the world organization considerably more scope than contemplated by the original Dumbarton Oaks plan It would empower the as sembly to recommend peaceful adjustments of any situations re gardless of origin which it deems likely to impair the general wel fare The Vandenberg amendment stilt must be acted upon by the full commission and by the full conference in plenary session But approval is certain the Big Four sponsored the amendment and the other nations endorse any move the assernbjy more power Vandenberg con eVgSftfie amendment the key to TJ S senate ratification of the world charter With it incorporated he believes he can answer virtually any crit icism raised in the U S senate Without it he would have grave doubts about the charter getting the two third vote needed for ratification The only other major amend ment approved in committee was one which will allow each coun try to have five representatives in the general assembly but with only one vote for each nation Thus if there were 50 nations in the world organization there would be only 50 votes but a max imum of 250 representatives The committee on the security council engaged in a 3 hour de bate Wednesday night over pro posals to increase the councils size from 11 nations to 15 Cuba proposed the larger idea supported by most of the Latin American nations who want more representatives on that body Action was postponed until Thursday Despite the first signs of prog ress from conference committees after more than 2 weeks here there are still several major is sues which require a lot of un tangling They include 1 The search for a formula to link such regional arrangements as the PanAmerican system with trie new world organization it must not destroy the 150 year old interAmerican system and like wise must not weaken the new world organization at its start 2 The attempt to reconcile the British and American plans on in ternational trusteeships so that American demands for complete control or former Japanese bases in the Pacific will not DD com promised 3 The sofar futile attempts of international jurists to reach any decisions on major problems in volving a new world diction ejection of judges mem bership enforcement power etc Approval of the Vandenberg amendment to the charter will go a long way toward making the as sembly a stronger part of the or ganization Power to act still will rest in the security council But Vandenbergs idea was to make the assembly a world town meeting of the world As it now reads it would charge the assembly with 1 Promoting Internationa co operation in political economic social and cultural fields 2 Assisting in realization of human rights and basic freedoms for all without distinction as to raje language religion or sex 3 Encouraging the development of international law 4 Recommending measures for peaceful adjustments of any situ ations regardless of originIn cluding situations resulting from violation of the purposes and principles of the world charter Buy your War Bonds and Stamps from your GlobeGazette i carrier boy GERMANS AFTER BERLIN SURRENDER CEREMONYThvee high German offiVml nd GmAdm Channel Islands Freed UBoats Head for Ports NAZIS FLEE TOWARD YANKS Some Resistance PSfi Pvt Richard McCann Killed in Combat on Luzon in P I Had Recently Joined Paragliders or Island London UR A British task force landed in the Channel is lands only British territory occu pied by the Germans in World war II and accepted the surren der ot the nazi garrison Thursday German sea forces also were capitulating A Uboat sailed into Weymonth harbor in surrender and G others that had continued their marauding until the reichs final hour were sighted heading for allied ports A BBC broadcast said the Brit ish naval ensign now was flying over German naval general head quarters at Kiel Germanys big gest naval base In Europe the last shots the land war were being exchanged in Czechoslovakia Austria and Yugoslavia Fearful nazi units were in full flight toward Ameri can lines in an attempt to escape capture by pursuing red armies and Yugoslav patriots The German garrisons of the Channel islands flashed word their surrender to the allies at a m DBST a m EWT Wednesday and the task force was dispatched to the islands Thurs day The London newspaper The Star said British technicians were flown into the islands from Lon don to reestablish telephone and telegraph communications German forces seized the Chan nel islands which lie between Frances Norman and Breton pen insulas in the summer of 1940 after overrunning France The small British garrison was with drawn just before the Germans moved in and DO fighting occurred in the islands The Germans fortified the is lands and they withstood heavy air and sea bombardment during the allied invasion of France in June last year At that time they refused a demand for their sur render German torpedo boats based in the islands harassed allied ship ping during the invasion but a subsequent air and sea blockade ended this menace and cut the is lands off from the outside world The Uboat which put into Wey mouth harbor and gave up to the royal navy was the first German submarine in this war to surren der in an English port An air minislry communique announced that up to dawn the RAFs coastal command had sighted 6 other submarines on the surface heading tor surrender points in compliance with Ger manys unconditional surrender Except for the death throes ot fleeingnazi units in the southeast fighting had ceased everywhere in Europe Premier Marshal Stalin an nounced that bypassed German pockets in Latvia in the Vistula delta near Danzig and on the Hel peninsula above the Polish port of Gdynia had joined in Germanys genera capitulation Up to a late hour Wednesday night 45000 oi perhaps 100 000 terman troops in the 16th and PVT RICHARD McCANN I8th armies in the Latvian pocket had laid down their arms The Russians occupied the German anchor towns of LJepaja and Tu kums Another 21000 filed into prison cages from the Vistula del ta and Hel peninsula From Copenhagen came word that 150 Russian troops had landed on the holdout Baltic is land of Bornholm Wednesday to accept the surrender of German i occupation forces who signalled their capitulation 400 B29s Hit Japan in Biggest Raid of War which Yanks Cutting Jap Forces on Mindanao Manila divisions of Pvt Richard James McCann 19 son of Mrs A G Canlield 208 7th N E was killed in action on Luzon on April 20 according to a message from the war depart ment Wednesday Pvt McCann had just recent ly joined a paraglider unit on the island he had stated in the last letter received from him here He had been overseas in the Philip pine area since the last part ofi January j Richard was born on Oct 30 192G in Mason City and was1 graduated from the local high school last June He entered the service in July and took his basic training at the Camp Wolters Tex infantry replacement train ing center Besides his mother he is sur vived by his stepfather A G Can field and 3 brothers One of these Hobert aviation radioman is at present stationed at Astoria Ore He had previously seen overseas service for 9 months A brother Lloyd lives in Minne apolis and Emmett lives at home POSTPONES SPEECH London statement from Prime Minister Churchills No 10 Downing street residence Thurs day said that owing to his manjj engagements at this time the prime minister had postponed his scheduled broadcast Thursday night He will speak Sunday at 9 p p in central war centers tlle moie tha B29 fppt fvnm F T7k srloke billowed skyward to 18000 feet fiom oil Iire3atkeytactories They described as in effective the curtain of anti aircraft fire from the guns of huddled in Ja pans inlandsea Specific targets included the Otake oil refinery the Tokuyama naval fuel station and the Toku yama synthetic fuel factory on Honshu Part of the hufrc aerial i i ask force also struck the Oshima hUgG area ftS danao and sealed off the northern end oi Davao gulf with the oc cupation of Samal island The encircling drive against tile Japanese in southeastern Min danao was being carried by col umns of the veteran 24th division Irom the south near Davao and the 31st division from the Kibawe area 53 miles to the northwest One unit of the 24th pushed a strong spearhead into the Japa nese pocket by crossing the Ta lomo river north of Mintal 2 miles inland from Davao The bridgehead across the Talomo opened the way for a thrust across the 8 mile wide Japanese defense belt between the Talomo and the Davao river to the north At the same time units ot the 31st division which had been pushing north through the cen ter of Mindanao suddenly cut to the east and pushed through the mountains in an attempt to cut off the northern escape routes ot the Japanese pocket Despite the rugged 31st division advanced 7 miles eastward from Kibawe in one day to reach a point approximately miles northwest of the 24th division on the Talomo river The 24th division which cap tured Davao last week secured the southern approaches to the port and blocked the whole north ern end of Davao gulf with an unopposed landing on Samal is land 3 miles off shore Gen Douglas MacArthur said the troops who landed on Samal in a shoretoshore operation rom Davao Tuesday were rapid ly clearing the 21 mile long is land Seizure of the island separated from the mainland by narrow Pakiputan Strait gave the Amer icans good artillery positions for protecting the advance up the northwestern coast of Davao gult and the drive into the strong Japanese hill defenses along Da vao river INTERNED ALIENS AVashington justice department was expected Thurs Weather Report FORECAST Mason City Partly cloudy to cloudy and continued cool Thursday and Friday Lowest temperature Thursday about 30 with scattered frost Iowa Partly cloudy and cool Thursday night Lowest tem peratures near freezing Friday mostly cloudy and cool with rain south and central portions Minnesota Partly cloudy Thurs day night and Friday Warmer northwest and west central por tions Thursday night frost and freezing temperatures east por tion warmer Friday IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette Weather Statistics Maximum Wednesday 45 Minimum Wednesday 32 At 8 a m Thursday 34 Precipi ta lion 23 inches YEAR AGO Maximum gg Minimum 45 U S CASUALTIES TOTAL 972654 Ground Forces Lose 34598During April Washington fP The fighting in Germany during April costi American ground forces 345981 casualties Secretary of War Stim son reported Thursday This figure included 5324 killed 25407 wounded and 3867 miss ing At the same time Stimson re ported ground force losses on the western front from the time of the I invasion last June until the end of April totalled 512113 includ ing 88225 killed wound ed and 58568 missing and taken 1 prisoner Stimson estimated that the cost in casualties for the army among all forces and for all theaters in i the war against Germany will amount to about 800000 includ ing approximately 150000 killed Fortunately he added about half of the wounded have already re turned to duty and those who were taken prisoner are returning to American forces Some 70000 to 80000 Ameri cans have been released from prison camps and more than 8000 j have now returned to this counI try The casualties for both the army and n a v y meanwhile neared the million mark with the announcement that army losses in all theaters as reported through April 30 have reached 867709 and navy losses have mounted to 104 945 This totalled 972654 an in crease of 22182 sincfc the previous weeks report on Komn i Rnfi i m rp on some 4800 German and Italian aliens interned or on parole in this ua uuu lOnc Iincl 1 hUlJ IPPl tinno country The status of Japanese The oil refinery t Otakc midway aliens vnll L J aliens will remain unchanged The raids come only a hours after Lt Gen Barney Giles commander of aimv air forces iii the Pacific said American bomb ers soon would be raiding Japan around the clock on a scale great er even than the air assault that crippled Germany A Japanese Domei dispatch recorded by the FCC said 80 B29s bombed Skikoku at 5 a m 40 raided southern Kyushu for an hour at 6 a m and 160 struck southern Honshu at 9 a m Another Dome dispatch re ported by the FCC said Japanese suicide planes sank an allied bat tleship and 2 aircraft carriers afire off Okinawa Wednesday Nearly 400 miles to the south west loth army forces in south ern Okinawa drove to within 1 500 yards the west coast city of Naha capital of the island the inland town of Shuvi and the cast coast port ot Yonabaru Marines on the west coast al ready could see the ruins oLNaha levelledby air and sea bombard ment and A communique announced that American casualties for the first 37 days of the Okinawa campaign were 16425 including 2684 dead American for every 16 Japanese killed Thursdays record Superfortress raid served notice to Japan that she could expect a steadily in creasing weight of bombs now that Germany has been defeated The giant bombers took off from Guam Tmian and Saipan in relays shortly midnight and arrived over Japans inland sea area soon after dawn in good weather that enabled them to pinpoint their tar gets They bombed 3 airfields and the Oshima oil storage area on Kyu shu the Tokuyama synthetic fuel factory and Otake oil relinery in southern Honshu and the Matsu yama airfield in northwest Shi koku The Oshima oil storage area is the largest known oil storage unit in Japan The Tokuyama factory is the main source of fuel for Japanese army planes while the nearby Tokuyama naval fuel sta The Tokuyama factory was 4 000 feet long and 1500 feet wide between Tokuyama and Kure Tfldhan WHERE ALLIES GAIN IN PACIFlCBlack areas indi cate Japanesehe d territory with arrows locating prin Americans kan island off Borneo   

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